100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

December 04, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-12-04

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE M IC1I4CAN DAIL PAGE

w

LO YELL FORECASTS
NEW EACH INE ERA4
Engineering Dean Sees Greater
Building Period Due to
Engineering Advances.
Near future developments in en-
gineering will usher in a period of
achievements which bids to be even
more interesting than the recent
period which saw such great for-
ward strides in macnines, transpor-
tation, buildings and public utility
services of all kinds, according to
Dean Alfred H. Lovell of the Engi-
neering school.
Dean Lovell speaking before Sig-
ma Rbo Tau, engineers' forensic}
society, Wednesday night said that J

HUNGER MARCH ON CAPITOL BEGUN

- ° -r7-t

BAND, GLEE CLUBS
WILL GIV ICONCERT'

BRACE DISCUSSES COMMON COLDA ,
THEIR PREVENTION AND TREATMENT

i

WHAT TO A

"More people are laid up and
more people miss work because of
colds than any other disease," Dr.
William M. Brace, Health Service l

tnis great advance in engineering
to come will call for the greates
skill and finest training of engi-
neers in all branches.
Super Highways in View.
Some immediate developments iT
civil engineering said Dean Lovel
will be "an increase in the volum
and speed of our vehicular traffi
so that we shall have to have a
system of superhighways unde
state control."
"All cross traffic," he continued
"will be passed underneath or or
elevated structures above such a
roadway, so that long haul running
speeds of 70 to 80 miles per hour
will be possible."
As a part of this system greal
bridges must necessarily be buil
and as Dean Lovell pointed out
construction of these will rest with
engineers being trained today.
In the fields of geodesy and sur-
veying new equipment and methods
are constantly improving these en-
gineering practices. Surveying will
be brought into new prominence by
the necessity of accurately laying
straight line routes to connect the
population centers of the nation,
Dean Lovell pointed out.
"The nation is alreadyncrossed
east t west and west to north by
the numerous triangulation chains
which locate points both in dis-
tance and direction with a mini-
auUm accuracy of one-quarter of an
ich per mile," declared Dean
Lovell, "and the surveyor who is
to "participate in this precise work
of the futureimust be well trained
In. mathematlcs."
Sees Electrical Progress.
Advancement in electrical engi-
neering is producing tremendous
generators with power as high as
I.0,000 kilowatts In one frame and
ef icencies of 965 per cent and
above. These new generators will
be of great use in efforts to break
down the atom, a problem which
at present is baffling science.
Particular advancements are be-
ing made in many other branches
of engineering. Marine engineers
are developing larger and faster
ocean liners, aeronautical engi-
neers are constructing faster and
safer flying craft for private and
commercial use, and chemical en-
gineers are becoming responsible
for new processes in the manufac-
ture of steel, gas, coke, petroleums,
rubber, paint ceramics, etc. In con-
clusion Dean Lovell pointed out
that engineers will be faced with
administrative and executive prob-
lems related to future engineering
projects in the large field open to
rising engineers, and that they will
be serving the government upon
nnerous boards, commisisons, and
in connection with the construction
of public works.
,Schwab Fids Memory
Failing in Courtroom
NEW YORK, Dec. 2-(iP)--Charles
i. Schwab, as a witness in a law-
suit today, got his figures mixed up
and sighed:
"Maybe I'm superannuated. I'm
79 years old, you °know. I can't re-
member all these things."
.Schwab was called foriexanna-
tion before trial in a suit brought

Rehearsals Begun for Christmas
Performance; Will Be
Given Dec. 17.
Plans for the annual Christmas
concert which the band, Men's and
Girls' Glee clubs will give Wednes-
day, Dec. 16 in Hill auditorium are
1already under way. All three or-
ga: izations are busy rehearsing for
thu event and from all indications
: colorful and varied program
should be given.
The Varsity band, following a
successful season on the football,
field has been cut down to its con-
cert size, 65 pieces, and several re-
hearsals other than the regular
Wednesday night practice sessions
will be held. Nicholas D. Falcone,
director, has been drawing up a
tentative program ror the event
and will announce the numbers in
the near future.
After a number of concerts which
have taken it to several surround-
ing cities and towns, the Men's
Glee club, numbering 70 men, is
also rehearsing for the concert un-
der Prof. David M. Mattern, the di-
rector.
Nora Crane Hunt, director of
the Girls' Glee club, has rehearsed
her organization for the event and
a varied program of songs will be
presented by the organization.
The concert, as has been the cus-
tom in the past, will be open to
the public.
Navel oranges of northern and
central Califoria ripen approxi-
mately two months earlier than
those of Southern California.

physician, said yesterday in an in-
terview.
According to Dr. Brace, the ne-
cessity to check colds in their early
stages is important because of the
high chances one runs by permit-
ting the disease germs to spread
around the members of the body;
hence, a cold may develop into
grippe, pneumonia, mastoid, or
other more serious illnesses.
Plenty of water and regular hours
serve as good remedies for the com-
mon cold. The diet should be
watched only when fever is present,
and it should then consist of light
foods and liquids.
"Despite the drenching received
in the Michigan State football
game," Dr. Brace said, "we had
very few students here with colds,
largely because they clanged cloth-
ing and took hot baths immediate-
ly after the game."
Research work now carried out
to investigate causes and cures for
Engineers to Inspect
Sugar Beet Factory
Prof. J. C. Brier of the Chemical
Engineering department of the
school of engineering will conduct
40 Seniors and Graduate engineer-
ing students on a trip to Blissfield,
Michigan today to inspect a sugar
beet factory.
The party will leave Ann Arbor
by special bus at 11 o'clock this
morning and will return this eve-
ning.
These inspection trips for stu-
dents are part of the series of ex-
cursions designed to give them ill-
ustrations of the practical use of
principles which they are studying.

colds is as extensive as that car-
ried out for any other disease pre-
valent to man.
"A large money grant has been
given in Baltimore for this inves-
tigation, and those in charge of it
make use of the Johns Hopkins
laboratories. Whenever d o c t o r s
treat a patient for a cold they take
smears of the germs, and make var-
ious tests.

"Investigation here at the Health
Service is largely statistical."
Commenting on the cold vacc ines
so popular now, Dr. Brace said that
only about 40 per cent of these vac-
cinations ever serve as a sure
check.
MINNESOTA--As a feature of the
'University of Minnesota homecom-
ing, the women of that institution
challenged those of the University
of Wisconsin to a cow-milking con-
test. An engraved milkcan will be
the prize awarded the winner.
KENTUCKY--University of Ken-
tucky women may hav their pic-
tures in the beauty section of the
year book if they present a peti-
tion signed by 50 percent of the
male students.

!"'tion of

the ;UIys ret ions

identity. The bewitching young la
was none other than our own Pr
dence Foster, '34, star reporter
the Daily women's staff.
And of all things, Prudence dr
out the name of B-rackley Shy,
sophomore reporter, as winner
the first rhen's prize of ten dolla
credit at a State Street clothi
store. The first women's prize we
to Helene Gram, '35, who gets t
dollars' credit at a certain beat
shop. The second prize of five do
tars' worth of cleaning and pre
ing was woti by Mrs;. Iva B. Ma]i
ney, not a student. To make tl
suspicions ofa Daily plot all t
greater Al Newman, '34, of t
Daily sports' staff is announced
winner of one of the ten fifty-ce
prizes. Over one hundr ed perso
competed in the contest.

Mysterious Blonde Draws
Winners of Coxtest.
This week's edition of "Wt-
Do," out today, announces
prize winners of the Famous
ings contest conducted by the
lication in its last three edi
Thirteen lucky numbers
drawn Tuesday at the Daily
by the Mysterious Blonde. Anc
we come to that stunning re

Associated Press Photo
A four column "national hunger march" starting from St. Louis,
Chicago, Buffalo, and Boston is scheduled to reach Washington before
Dec. 7. After a country-wide investigation, secret service men said that
communist leaders were active in organizing the march.
MAJORITY OF MEN STUDENTS LIVE
IN APPROVED HOUSES, SA YS DEAN

Flowers of Satsf acti

More than 75 per cent of the men
students in the University live in
approved rooming houses according
to a =report just released by the
office of the Dean of Students.
Surroundings which are up to a
reasonable standard of cleanliness
and comfort are important in a
successful college life, the Univer-
sity believes, and has for many
years maintained an inspection of
men's rooming houses.
Freshman are required to live in
approved houses, 'others are not.
Furthermore t h e student pays,
markedly less for this accomoda-
tion this year than last. A student
occupying a single room may save
$38 or more over, the cost 'of a like
lodging last year.
(A total of 791 rooming houses
were inspected by the dean's office
of which 682 were approved and 109
against Morgan Belmnont & Co.,
brokers' and bankers, and James
Speyer & Co., brokers, by Victor!
Sockige and. Michael Kay, who
claim $140,000 as commission in the
sale by Schwab of 20,000 shares of
Chicago Pneumatic Tool Co. stock
to Speyer & Co.
Schwab first said he received $160
a share for the stock, but after his
memory was refreshed by a letter
dealing with the transaction chang-
ed the figure to $127.50.
If you write, wehave it.
Corresponde ce Stationery,
Founta in pTs, Ink, etc.
'.yp rritees all -aks.
Greeting Card for everYbody.
{. D, 14 0 R F1I LL
4 S. ate St., Ann Arfir.
xpNh
D pT
4_

not approved. The average student'
group in each house is small, 361
of the houses accomodating less
than five men, while 233 accomo-

, .r
,. _ ,
.
-
r , , , 3
f
(...
h , r
t
- .)
t
f

Are you satisfied with ya
present Florist? Do you
the highest grade flowers?
the price right? If not, st
pose you give us a trial. Y
will be pleased with our fl
ers and delighted with c
service. The Ann Art
Florists, Inc., maintains one
the finest floral stores in t
city located on Liberty Str
one block East of Main.

i

1 1

i

date from 10 to 15, and only 18
lodge more than 15 men. Last year,
single rooms, of which there were
1,108, averaged $4.79 per week rent,
doubles inspected numbered 583,
and rented for $3.68 a week for
each student.
There were 535 suites inspected,
renting for an average of $4.72 a
week- for each student, and 117f Styles in rei
houses or apartments averaging
$40.78 a month. This year all rents
have dropped, single rooms about
one dollar a week, with other ac-
comodations somewhat less in pro- A
portion. This difference in room.1E
costs has probably meant the dif-
ference between staying in college,
and dropping out for many nien, -

GIVE HIM
SLIPPERS
for Christmas

A variety of comfort.

Come in 'or Just Dial 6215

d, blue, green, tan and black with either hard or
soft soles and heels.
123 EAST LIBERTY STREET

We are members of The Florist Telegraph /lssockation
n Arbor lorists
IN*C .
122 East Liberty Street

.ry....
s..;;
;_'
" -' :
',.-..
.,,: r ;
.;.
,,: <;t
.: :
.
_s: ';

I

I

0

GO
0 N.,

PRICES

AIL A VP
ALL

en's and
Women's

JIN AGREAT STOCK REDUCINP DRIVE

FALL BUYING HAS BEEN SLOW-We have hundreds of pairs that should
YVE 100 PAIRS MUST BE TUHNED INTO CASH IN A HURRY

have been sold long ago.
IT MUST BE DONE!

.

New Ideas
Jn Millinery

395 P airs
MEN'S SHOES
$10.00 and $11.00]
shoes-new fall and
winter styles Scotch
grams and calfskins.

M= airs
MEN'S SHOES
$8.50, $9.00 and
$10.00 s hoes-f all
and winter styles. All
styles and leathers,
to go
in this
sale

zoo Pis
MEN'S SHOES
of fine grain or caif.

of $6.00 shoes for
dress or street wear,
that we have left, will
go fast at
this low
price. It is

Should sell

1
K..W .. L 9 tea'

for the Holidays'

Choice

$70@9

pair. They go in this
sale and
they will $
go fast at

For dinner hats and dressy afternoon
wear satin is supplanting velvet either in
a satin ribbon or in a heavy satin crepe.
Maline and satin combinations are also
very fashionable.
As a gift suggestion may we remind you
of our large assortment of costume
jewelry.

I'

.

V

1
e° o0ve

WEAR FLORSHEIM SI OES AT

THE

NEW LOW PRICES

Some brken lots as low and $6.95, others as low as $7.95.

e* re' a

great chance to save.
SPECIAL-A par of fine silk hose FREE with each pair of Florsheim's during
this sale.
850 Pairs of Florsheims-all at Much Lower Prices.

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan