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December 03, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-12-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

QORATIG H p n CHOICE OF HOUSE L M C(NFER
ED IN BATTLE ON ENGLISH TOPIS
SFT I~ HfCampbell, C o w d e n, O'Neill,
S M ' -TilN ..1

MONGOLOIDS CROSSED LAND BRIDGE
FROM ASIA OVER 10,000 YEARS AGO

ty Wins Two Vote Majority
as Result of New Jersey
Election.
kT EASTERN VICTORY
w Hampshire District Offers
pportunity for Another
Seat in House.
rASHINGTON, Dec. 2-(P)-Elat-
by victory in New Jersey Tues-
r the Democrats are becoming
guine over the possibility of tak-
the last remaining vacant house
t in the First New Hampshire
rct.
'he party holds 219 seats, two
re than a bare majority, as a re-
of the election of Percy Stewart
Plainfield, N. J., in the normally
publican Fifth congressional dis-
'he leaders, among them Speak-
Candidate Garner of Texas,
ed the result an omcn for 1932's
sidential election. Stewart's vic-
y had converted a normal 35,-
Republican majority into an
e of 1,500 to 2,000 for the Demo-
'be New Hampshire district can-
Jbe won in time for representa-
1 at the organization of the
ise, but the Democrats will need
ry vote even after the Jan. 5
clal election to fill it. The seat
s been occupied by a Democrat'
:e before in recent years. Among
ers of the district are the mill
ployes of Manchester, with whose
lots if a strong candidate offers,
Democrats believe they will win.
five out of seven recent elections
611 house vacancies have favored
Democrats. Three of the five
ories took seats which had been
,p"ed by Republicans.
tewart was elected by a plurali-
jf 1,902 votes. Complete returns
rM the 198 districts giving Stew-
31,567 and Donald H. McLean,
ublican, 29,655.
he national Republican admin-
ation was the majority issue in
campaign.
Alication Approves
Co edy Club Drama
The Streets of New York," by
tn Baucicault, recently presented
l by the Comedy club, has been
ced on the "white list" of cur-
t plays by the National Catholic
eatre Movement in its autumn
letim.
)ny five other plays were recom-
uded in the bulletin. These are:
ie Camels Are Coming," "Did I
yl No?," "The Good Companions,'>
ie Guest Room," and "If I Were
The bulletin notes that only 30
ys were covered., while during
same period two years ago 53
ys were reported on. The idea of
movement, it is stated, is to
ble the individual to set up a
sorship of bis own, rather than
)cnd on a generagone.
SPECIAL THIS WEEK
[1ts Pressed, 25c. Suits Cleaned and
ie sed . 50c. Alterations at cost.
ow fall samples. Custom made, $25.
CHAS. DOUKAS
1319 South University
you write, we have it.
irespondence Sta.tionezy,
oudtein Pens, Ink, etc.
ipewriters all mokes.
eeting Ceards for eve17body.
. D. M oyRR I L L
~47S. State St., Ann Az'br.

-ries, Attend nationa meet
in Milwaukee.
Attending the meeting of the Na-
k ftional Council of Teachers of Eng-
ish, Professors Oscar J. Campbell,
Rey W. Cowden, and Charles C.
ries, of the English department,
nd Prof. James M. O'Neill, of the
Speech department, were in Mil-
waukee, Wis., last week-end.
Professor Campbell is vice-presi-
dent of the organization'which is
. attempting to survey the English
I eaching programs of . associated
schools from the first grade through
graduate courses. The aim of the
f council is to determine what should
be the objectives of all teachers of
M " English along lines of composition,
Assoctated Pres3 PhotG gra mar,linguistics, literature;!and
John Garner, Democratic repre- related subjects.
sentative to Congress, who is slated' According to Professor Campbell,
to be the next speaker of theHouse it is the hope of the council to
of Representatives. Garner is from make good programs for study of
Texas. English, speech, linguistics and al-
e___s.__lied subjects all the way through
the educational program so that
the proper foundatiorn in English
may be had by all students in pre-
.paration for college, and through
college for graduate work.
PAPER AT L N IProfessor Campbell is chairman
rof the committee investigating col-
lege teaching of English, as well as
Carrothers to Present Report a member of the steering commit-
tee of the organization which con-
on 'Teaching Efficiency' trols the whole program of the
at Conference. council.
This organization, P r o f e s s o r
Efficiency in high school teaching Campbell stated, is the first one
is being lowered by the fact that ever to enlist the aid of all levels
is beiangof English teaching to the cause of
the total number of teachers is not arranging a definite teaching pro-
being increased in proportion to gram.

Dr. Gilmore Points Out Wide or improved over the native Indian
Distributor of Corn, products.!
Beans, Squash. All this agricultural productivity
centered in Central America and
The high state of cultivation and Peru, Dr. Gilmore points out. Be-
the wide distribution of corns, fore even the simplest of these cul-
beans, squash and other Indian tures could arise it was necessary
food plants offer botanical evidence for a sizeable population to filter
that the first wandering bands of very slowly downward from Alaska
America's first settlers must have through an unknown continent, a
process that the human tendency
ecme over the land bridge that once to settle in villages wherever fav-
connected Siberia and Alaska at orable extended longer than the1
a much earlier date than the 10,- spread of a species of wild animal'
>CO years ago which many conser- would take.
n A s. nsts have maintained, Once established in Central
states Dr. Melvin R. Gilmore, eth- America an unknown tine, passed
before these people passed from
nobotanist and curator of ethno- mere hunting and gathering of
logy in the University museum of food to the first rude attempts at
anthrology. deliberate growing of some of the
The fact that staple Indian food wild plants. Dr. Gilmore would put
plants were so highly specialized as this agriculture considerably pre-
to be dependent on man for their' vious to that of the Mayas, Aztecs,
propagation, and also that a great and Incas.
diversity of types of these crops
were spread over a wide geogra-I
phic area, indicates that a long his-LOGL tPDean Attends
tory of cultivation by the Indian j Southern Conference
from the wild forms lay behind the
plants the white man found on his As a fraternal delegate from the
coming to America, and which are North Central Association of Col-
found only native in American leges and Secondary Schools, Dean
agriculture. J. B. Edmonson of the Educaticn
Since then these plants have school is in Montgomery, Alabama,
been carried around the world, but attending the annual meeting of
they have not been markedly ex- the Southern Association of Col-
tended in geographic latitude, nor leges and Secondary Schools, De-
have they been essentially altered cember 1-4.

Among the'

Better
(6 II $ IS
WdurCan Buy For

Conisider the

total enrollment, Prof. George Car-
rothers of the Education school
points out in a report which he will
present at a conference of high
school principals of the Michigan
Education Association, on Decem-
ber 3 and 4 at Lalising.
Prof. Stuart A Courtis of the Ed-,
ucation School will also be at the
conference.
"Because each teacher has a
greater number of students to han-
die, he is not able to give each one
as much individual attention as
would otherwise be possible," said
Professor Carrothers, commenting
on the figures in his report. "I be-
lieve that the ill effects of this con-
dition will manifest themselves in a
few years if the situation contin-
ues."
The satistics show that last year,
801 .new teachers were employed by
Michigan schools in the North Cen-
tral Association of Colleges and
Secondary Schools; this year only
502 were added. At the same time,
total enrollment in these schools
has increased from 108,000 to 128,-
000. Professor Carrothers attributed
this diminution to two factors, both
connected with the present finan-
cial crisis: that veteran teachers
are holding on to their jobs, and
that schools are cutting down on
their budgets.

High School Editors
Convene Here T odc1
(Continued from Page 1)
Following Mr. White's address,
group discussions will be held be-
ginning at 10 o'clock and conclud-
ing at noon.
The afternoon assembly, starting
at 1 o'clock, will be in charge of W.
L. Maple, a former professor of
journalism at Washington and Lee
university, now associated with the
staff of The American Boy in De-
troit. From 3 until 5 o'clock group
discussions again will be held.
The annual banquet will be Fri-
day night. Wesley H. Maurer, in-,
structor in the department of jour-
nalism, will be the principal speak-
er.
Donal Hamilton Haines, instruc-
tor in the department of journal-
ism, will be the speaker at the Sat-
urday morning assembly, which
will be followed by the final set of
group discussions. At the luncheon
the best papers entered in the com-
petition will be awarded certificates
and cups.
A special feature during the con-
vention will be an exhibit of high
school publications, including edi-
torial layouts and other features.
ra t T( DAY

Never Before
Has This Value Been
Possible.
Smartly Tailored
TUXEDOU

MichiganDal
Not ore gft, but a gift for each day
of the sdhool year.
The special Christmas offer makes it
especially attractive.

$3.00

(MAILED)

$195°~

215-217 South Ashley Street
Out of the High Rent District

A SPECIAL CHRISTMAS CARD WITH YOUR NAME
ATTACHED WILL BE SENT TO EACH PERSON AN-
NOUNCING THAT HE WILL RECEIVE THE DAILY FOR
THE REMAINDER OF THE YEAR.
Press Building Phone 21214
SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

I

t 40 Amm M

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EXTRA ADDED__

Billy House
Comedy

Hearst
News =

Bill =
Tilden =

Burton
Holmes

For All
Anmiversaries

FLOWERS
Are the mosj appropriate
Floral Art Work Is Our
Specialty.

COMING SATURDAY
JAMES DUNN-MAE MARSH "OVER
'SALLY EILERS THE HILL"
--

Held Over By Popular Demand

University
Flower Shop

VILL

E. Liberty

Phone 6030

ROGERS

uprove the holidays by be-
oming acquainted with the
ooks offered by
THE PRINTED PAGE
Circulating Library
605 East William

IN

Ambassador

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