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November 20, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-11-20

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THL MICHICAN DAILY

ROYALTY IS CHEERED AS PARLIAMENT OPENS

on liiluorunI Uli
higan Lawyers' Association
Directors to Make Plans
for O rnizing Here.
Plans for promoting the incor-
poration of the Michigan bar as-
soation will be formulated tomor-
re when the board of directors
of the state association meets in
the Lawyer's club, according to
PHof. E. Blythe Stason, secretary
of the organisa.fin.
for strengthening itsdiciplinary
j~sction over the entire body
of practising lawyers in. the state
ftch an incorporation is essential,
It was stated. At present only 25
to 30 per cent of the lawyers can
be reached through the associa-
tion.
California, New Mexico, Utah,
and Nevada have incorporatd bars
at the present. The new plan is
tie coming form of bar organiza-
tihn, Professor Stason said.
The board is made up of one
member from each of the congres-
stO1 i' distriicts in the state, besides
the officers of the organization.
Besides the incorporation discus-
sion the group will appoint com-
mittees, consider a budget and for-
mulate plans for the coming year.
The 'Alumnus' Features
,..
-Franklin Bush Mead, '06, is just
as well known to anlateur hortcul-
turists all over the country as- he
is to insurance com uany executives.
He is a frequent contributor to
"House and Garden" and his place.
Irisrest, at Fort Wayne, Indiana,
is a mecca for gardenis who come
tq admire his Irises, Daffodils, Peo-
nies and other hardy plants. Incl-.
dentally he is interested in etchings
~and Chinese ceramics. Since 1911
he has been with The Lincoln Na-
tional Life Insurance Company, ris-
ing from the position of Secretary
andl Actuary to that of Executve
Vice President. He was Founder
and first President of The Life Of-
fiee Management Association, a pio-
neer in the,study of disability i-
surance, and a frequent writer and
speaker o4~ insurance subjects.
--Brut Abel, '92D, early decided
that climbing poles as a telephone_
lineman and trouble shooter would.
notG take him high enqugh, so he
changed his job. His lfe on a fa m
near Battle Creek prompted him to.
avoid agriculture-though today
his: avocation is horticulture-so he
turned to teaching, capitalizing on
the two years of high school study
he had earned by tending furnaces
and by being a night telephone op-
erator. After qix years in pedagogy
he entered Michigan's Dental De-
partment. Elk Rapids and Albion,
in Michigan, were the scenes o his
practice until 1905, when he turned
to, Toledo - and orthodontia, his
spdcia 1y today. Numerous impor-
tarn'offices in dental societies have
been given him in recognition of
his leadership in the profession,
among them the presidency in 1923
of the American Society of Ortho-
dontists.
-Ella Seass Stewart, '9, while at
' Ann Arbor kor her single6 year of
study at the Univeryity (she had
earned an A.B. at Eureka College in
Illinois, where she later received
an A.M. degree) was influonced.
greatly'in listening to two wonder-
ful women, Susan B. Anthony and
Alice Freeman Palmer. Today she
is known as a national leader in
the campaign to defend prohibition,
as the Manager of a Special Wo-
man's Department in a Chicago
bank and as a local and active
Michigan al u m n a. Twenty-five

years ago she Was recognized all
over the country as an organizer
and a campaigner in the National
American Woman's Suffrage Asso-
ciation and the W. C. T. U.
Dramatists Will Use
New Revolving Stage
(Big Ten News Servicc)
MADISON, Wis., Nov. 19.-A re-
volving stage, enabling the rapid
presentation of a series of expres-
sionistic sets, will be used by a uni-
versity little theatre for the first
time when the Wisconsin Players,I
University of Wisconsin dramatic
group, opens with "The Adding
Machine," this week.
FOUNTAI NPB1E
Parker, Sh. ffer, Waterm,
Conklin, etc., $1.00 and up.
A large and choice assori'ent
epainaL L,
314 S. Sate Ste., Ann A r.

EVEN DEPRESSION WILL NOT DRIVE
A MAN TO CARRYING SANDWICH SIGN

Local Workers Shrink From Job
of Advertising Comedy
Club Play.
Undismayed at having an eco-
nomic depression slip through its
fingers, Comedy club has decided,
"the show must go on."
Presenting "The Streets of New
York," dealing with the depres-
sion of 1857, because of its appro-
priateness to the alleged present
depression, the club was consider-
ably taken aback when the current
depression in Ann Arbor was re-
vealed to be nothing more than a
myth, apparently a shadow of its
former self.
After placarding the town for a,
week with the slogan, "Poverty is
no crime," Comedy club is nowj
forced to reveal facts which show
that poverty is a crime.
The ignominy of poverty is ap-
parently such a crime that not one
member of Ann Arbor's vast army,
of unemployed can be hired to play!
the role of sandwich man, carry-
ing a sign on his back for 50 cents
an hour to advertise the play,
which opened last night at the
Mendelssohn theatre.
Last Monday Robert C. McDon-
ald, '32, business manager of the
show, called the Ann Arbor unem-
ployment bureau and asked to be
put in touch with a man, preferab-
ly beyond middle age, who could
be hired to work for three days
carrying an advertising "sandwich"
on his back. No results from the
bureau have been forthcoming

since,
Anxious to obtain someone for
the position, and with no Comedy
club members volunteering to fill
the breach, McDonald yesterday
answered a want ad inserted in a
local paper by a man who seem-
ingyc desired work. This particu-
lar soldier of the great army of un-
employed declined the job when-
told that the work would be for
only ive hours each day.
Besekirsky and Rhead
Will Present Concert
Wassily Beekirsky, professor of
viclin, and 'Mabel Ross Rhead, asso-
cite professor of piano in the mu-
si school, will combine in a violin
and piano sonata recital Sunday
afternoon in Lydia Mendelssohn
theatre. Hill auditorium had been
originally scheduled but was impos-
sible to obtain.
The artists have achieved not
only local, but national recognition
for their work in the piano-violin
field and gave a number of con-
certs last year.
Student Publications
to Be Shown in Russiak
Upon the receipt of a letter ask-
ing all Michigan publcations to be
sent to the All Nations Press ex-
hibition in Tiflis, Georgia, Russia,
The Daily, Gargoyle and Michigan-
ensian will forward both old and
new copies of their publications.
The exhibition has been planned
by "the Soviet government as a
means of showing the historical de-
velopment of the press of all na-
tions. Michiganwas one of the few
trmerican universities to receive
he invitation.
The Gargoyle has also been in-
vited to send copies of its issues to
the Cleveland Public library and
the Association of National High
School manuals.

GopmrsWill Brin
Hundred-Piece Band
for Game Saturda
(Spec l to The Daily)
MINNEAPOLIS, Nov. 19. - Alo:
with the 2,000 rooters who will jou
ney the 700 miles from Minneapo
to witness the Homecoming gan
between the Gophers and the Wc
verines Saturday, will be the era
100-piece Maroon and Gold band.
The M i n n e s o t a organizatic
which has had daily rehearsals f
the past six weeks on extensi
drills, formations and marching d
tails, has added the finishing touc
es to its program, having prepar.
a novel presentation for the se
tators between the halves.
Under the direction of Allen A
bott, the new bandmaster, not on
has an inclusive repertoire 1ec,
developed, but also a Big Ten me
ley, orchestrated by Gopher rAnu
cians to fit the formations, will X
offered.
Last year, the Minnesota bar
toured the South and received n<
tion-wide attention. The dru
majors of the outfit during the la
few years have also been looked ul
on as among the nation's best.
Paintingz the Town Is
Costl fr Stud e$
(Bey To nXews Servicc)
MADISON, Wis. - cTwomember
of. Cardinal Key, interfraternity s
ciety at the University of Wiscor
sin, whose job is to "paint tl
town" and to do it literally eve
homeco-ming, were caught in tl
act of whitewashing "Buck t
Buckeyes" on the brick fenoec
Prof. William H. Kiekhofer. Vl
fence, which has been painted ever
year, must be repainted in its vi
gin red to the satisfaction of ti
owner, by the two miscreants,
they are to escape a $25 fine in
posed at the local bar of justice.

Assocamedrress Pnoto
Thousands lined the streets of London to cheer King George and Queen Mary as their elaborate car-
riage was driven from Buckingham Palace to Westminster for the opening of parliament. England forgot'
its economic woes for the moment as pomp and pageantry held sway.

ILLI OIS CONTISTS
University Lawyer Contends
Scientific Instruments
Are Not Taxable.
(Big Ten News Service)
URBANA, Ill., Nov. 19.-Prof.
Sveinbjorn Johnson of the College
of Law of the University of Illi-
nois, legal counsel, recently filed
a brief in the United States court
of customs appeals which may,
mean an annual savings of $100,000
to state institutions throughout
tle country.-+
The University is contesting the
right of the national government
to levy and collect taxes on scien-
tific instruments for use exclusive-
ly for educational purposes by a
state-supported institution.
In a decision in June, 1929, the
United States customs court held
that the University was a proprie-
tary institution, not a state agent,
and could therefore be assessed for
the tax.

RICHARD NA YSMIHIT SPEAKS BEFORE,
MICHIGAN SOCIALIST ORGANIZATION

Defense of Capitalism Called
eDefense of Brutality.'
"Defense of capitalism is defense
of brutality beyond description. The
story of child labor in the wool
and cotton mills of England is one
of tie tragedies of history."
These opinions were brought be-
fore the Michigan Socialist club
Wednesday night by Richard Nay-
smith, co-worker of Ramsey Mac-
Donald and Philip Snowden in the
early days of the English labor par-
ty, in a talk, "The Growth and
Present Position of the British La-
bor Party." Naysmith has been in
America for 10 years anc is at the
present time located in Detroit. He
was one of the survivers of the de-
funct Socialist party of Michigan.
"Labor unions originated in Scot-
land a good many years ago. The
labor party first was established in
Parliament in 1900, with 15 seats,
and from that time has increased
at every election until the last,
when it lost a few seats. This de-
feat will do the party good, and

will wake the members up," said

Naysmith.
"The British worker expects the Prof.
government to see that he has work to
if he supports the government. 1
Unlike America, Britain is at all ( Prof.
times faced with unemployment. nomics
The Labor party attempts to alle- the seco
viate this, and has in a measure the Cos,
succeeded. Like all Socialists, they tomorro
favor free trade. It is the only fessor R
labor movement that is not protec- the rela
tionist. ter natioi
"Capitalism has served its pur- In cor
pose, but it is unsound basically," the Chi,
Naysmith concluded. sent on
iL.

Remer to Speak
Cosmopolitan Club
C. F. Remer of the eco-
department, will speak at
nd of a series of lectures of
mopolitan club at 8 o'clock
w night in Lane Hall. Pro-
Remer's talk will center on
tionship of economics to in-
)nal problems.
S punctionwith'this meeting
nese Student Club will pre-
e scene of play.

1111 ;

UPERIOR

e
/
""
A
r /l
li r ,

AFTER THE DANCE

MILK and ICE CRE~A

for

Tctsted Sandwiches
Fountain Specialties
BETSY ROSS SHOP
13-15 Nickels Arcade

Special 2-Layer Brick
Vanilla-Cream Pumpkin
PUNCHES-FANCY MOLD5

0

Phone 2Z3181

We Deliver

Dial 5931

The Haunted Tavern

II .

I r.,

Tea Room and Gift Shop.

Special Football Luncheon and Dinner
Saturday.
MAKE EARLY RESERVATIONS FOR OUR
THANKSGIVING DINNER.

417 East Huron Street

Phone 7781

UNI
Orato
AN
onday
November 23

ric1
NUAL LECTURE SE
Opening Attraction
November 23

VERSITY OF MICHIGAN

_ _ __ _ _ . t

'IES
Monday
November 23

Honey Brand Smoked Hams......
(Whole or half)
Creamed Cottage Cheese .........
ild Cured Bacon .............. .
(Slab or piece)
Red, White and Blue Brand Coffee.

... 17c

Rafael Sabatini

... 12c
.19c
...31c

_ _--- __ .- y

Plenty of Home Dressed
Ducks and Chickens, for

Turkey, Geese,
Thanksgiving.

Author of

Place Your Order Early.

"Captain Blood"
"The Snare"

Lecture Subject
"Fiction In History
and
History In Fiction"

gEshelbach Market

"Sea Hawk"

202 East Huron

Phone 4159

r-

I

d

SPAT

SEASON

IS

SAND
IKILLINS GRAVEL
COMPANY
Telephone 7112

HERE
$125

Monday
November 23 OT
Winstc
F.
Geor
Chair
Marti
America
B

"HEM NUMIBERS
Dn Spencer Churchill
amous British Statesman
ge W. Wickersham
man, Wickersham Committce
in and Osa Johnson
a's best-know African explorers
ertrand Russell
Philosopher and essayist

Monday
November._3

to

$500

'II

k ,.a v gr -ismIA

aI a fair II

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