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November 08, 1931 - Image 4

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-11-08

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Published every morning except Monday during the University year
by the Board in Control of Student Publications. ,
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
publication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
credited in this paper and the local news published herein.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann ;Arbor, Michigan, as second
class matter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
Postmaster General..
subscription by carrier, $4.00; br mail, $4.50
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
Kichigan, Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L TOBIN
Editorial Director...........................Beach Conger, Jr.
City Editor...................................Carl Forsythe
Nowe Ed'tor .................................David M. Nichol
Sports Editor...............................Sheldon O. Fullerton
Women's Edrditor .....................Margaret M. Thompson
Assistant News Editor .... .................... oetL ire

more -completely than John N. Garner of Texas
who will most likely be the next Speaker. To him
will fall the task of holding in line a party com-
posed of men from all sections of the country and
representing all interests. His ability as floor
leader for the minority in the past few years has
been unquestioned. What he will do when he
takes the gavel remains to be seen.
It represents a healthy condition when party
control changes and it is with favor that we look
upon the results of Tuesday's returns. No one can
help but feel, however, just a bit doubtful about
the coming session and it will be with intense
interest that the nation will watch the impending
events.
IDR 11OJRAL CONPMJENT-
REASONS FOR THANKSGIVING
(Indiana Daily Students)
President Hoover has issued the annual Presi-
dent's Thanksgiving proclamation setting aside
Thursday, Nov. 26, as a day of national thanksgiving
for the advantages enjoyed despite a "measure of

B. Gilbreth'
%d Goodman
Rarl Seiffert

NIGHT EDITO
J. Cullen Kenn

RS
iedy James Inglis
Jerry E. Rosenthal
George A. Stauter

iber J. Myers
an Jones

tanley W. Arnh im
awson E. Becker
homas Connelan
amuel G. Ellis
amuel L. Finkle
ouis B. Gascoigne
orothy Brockmnan
tiriam Carver
3eatrice Collins
ouise Crandall
,lsle Feldman
'rudence Foster

Sports Assistants
John W. Thomas
REPORTERS
Fred A. Huber
Norman Kraft
Ioland Martin
Henry Meyer'
Marion A. Milezewski
Albert H. Newman
E. Jerome Pettit
GeorgiaGeisman
Al1ice Gilbert
Mfarthka Littleton
E izabeth Long
Frances Manchester
Elizabeth Mann

John S. Townsend
Charles A. Sanford
John W Pritchard
Joseph Renihan
C. Hart Schaaf
Brackley Shaw
Parker R. Snyder
G. R. Winters
Margaret O'Brien
Hillary Rarden
Dorothy Rundell
Elma Wadsworth
Josephine Woodhams

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 2"214
ARLES T. KLTNE ... ...................Business Manager
RRIS P. JOHNSON.. . ............Assistant Manager
Department Managers
ertising .......................................Vernon Bishop
ertising Contracts.... ................Robert Callahan
ertising service .......... ..........Byron C. Vedder
ications .................. .........William T. Brown
ulation ........ ...................Harry R. Begley
>unts ..... .................. ........ Richard Stratemeir
nen's Business Manager ........................Ann W. Verner

rvil Aronson
ilbert E. Bursley
lien Clark
obert Finn
onna Becker
artha Jane Cissel
Genevieve Field'
axine Fisehgrund
ynn Gallmeyer
Lary Harriman

Assistants
John Keysee.
Arthur F. Kohn
James Lowe
Bernard E. Schnacke
Anne Harsha
Katharine Jackson
Dorothy Layin
Virginia McComb
Carolin Mosher
Hie i-en Olsen
llelen Schmeede

Grafton W. Sharp
Donald Johnson
Don Lyon
Bernard H. Good
May Seefried
Minnie Seng
Helen Spencer
Kathryn Stork
Clare EInger
Mary Elizabeth Watts

passing adversity."
"Our country has cause for gratitude to th
Almighty. We have been widely blessed with abun
dant harvests. We have been spared from pestilenc
and calamities. Our institutions have served th
people. Knowledge has multiplied and our lives ar
enriched with its application. Education has ad
vanced, the health of our people has increased. W
have dw t in peace with all men. The measure o
passing adversity which has come upon us shoult
deepen the spiritual life of the people, quicken thei
sympathies and spirit of sacrifice for others, an
strengthen their courage," the President states.
It almost is a relief to have our attention caller
to the fact that there are this year in these Unite(
States many things to cause rejoicing. The man wh
has lost hisjob because of poor business condition
or the business man whose income has been paralyze(
by the depression may feel that our blessings are to
intangible to justify optimism. The great majorit
of the American people are, however, living almos
as comfortably as they did before the crash came.-
President Hoover mentions that educational facil
ities have increased, and that we are at peace wit]
all men. Each of these elements in our national lif
is cause for gladness. University enrollments through
out the United States have remained practically th
same as they were last year. Grade and high schoo
enrollments have increased. As long as nationa
peace is assured and opportunities for educatior
abound, the American people have ample cause foi
thanksgiving.
THE IDEA BEHIND 'GOING TO COLLEGE'

Le
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1

What's
Going
On
SUNDAY
Michigan - "Susan Lenox: Her
Fall and Rise" with Greta Garbo
andI Clark Gable.
Majestic-"The Phantom of Par-
is" with Johh Gilbert and Leila Hy-
ams.
Wuerth-"East of Borneo" with
Charles Bickford.
Concert-School of Music trio at
4:15 o'clock in Hill auditorium.
University Broadcast-"Constipa-
tion in Childhood" by Dr. Murray
Cowie. "University News of the
Week" by Prof. Waldo Abbot.
MONDAY
Michigan - "Susan Lenox:GHer
Fall and Rise" with Greta Garbo
and Clark Gable. Owl show: "Con-
demned" with Ronald Coleman and
Ann Harding.
Majestic-"The Phantom of Par-
is" with John Gilbert and Leila Hy-
ams.
Wuerth-"East of Borneo" with
Charles Bickford.
University Broadcast-"The Field
of Speech" by Prof. James M.
O'Neill. Musical program by George
Poinar, violinist.
A
Washington
Bystander
By Kirke Simpson
WASHINGTON-A friend of the
Bystander insists he has made a
discovery about the Roosevelt-for-
President boom that might be im-

HALF SOLES AND LEATHER
HEELS
$1.25
Why Pay More?
COLLEGE SHOE
SHOP
426 Thompson
Free Call & Delivery
Dial 6898

Mu

sical

Events

NIGHT EDITOR-ROLAND GOODMAN
SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 8, 1931

All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium u n I e s s otherwise
noted. The afternoon concerts
are g i v e n without admission
charge.
HANNS PICK, 'cello, WASSILY
BESEKIRSKY, Violin, JO-
SEPH BRINKMAN, Piano,
Nov. 8, 4:15.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, DAVID MAT.
TERN, Conductor, Nov. 15,
4:15.
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Pi-
ano, Nov. 17, 8:15.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, Violin,
MABEL ROSS RHEAD, Piano,
Nov. 22, 4:15.
THE REVELERS, James Melton,
1st tenor, Phil Dewey, baritone,
Lewis James, 2nd tenor, Wil-
fred Glenn, bass, Frank Black,
Director and Pianist, Dec. 3,
8:15.
L A U R A LITTLEFIELD, So-
prano, December 6, 4:15.
THE "MESSIAH" by Handel,
University Choral Union, Uni-
versity Symphony Orchestra,
Soloists, Earl V. Moore, Con-
ductor, December 13, 4:15.
DETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Ossip Gabrilow-
itsch, Conductor, Dec. 15, 8:15.
DON COSSACK R U SS I A N
CHORUS, Serge Jaroff, Con-
ductor, Jan. 13, 8:15.
DETROIT SYMPHONY OR
CHESTRA, Dr. Rudolf Siegel,
Guest Conductor, Jan. 25,
8:15.

WANT ADS PASY'
You can pay more at other
shops but you don't get
any more quality.
HALF SOLES AND RUBBER
HEELS

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Just dial 9495 and ask our man
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Dial 9495
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I

SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sti-ents!

he Business

Revival Needs Leaders
HERE AND THERE may be seen slight signs
of a lightening of the depression. Markets,
the barometers of business conditions, have ceased
their steady fall. Instead spasmodic fluctuations
are apparent, with appreciable increases in prices
cooming at irregular intervals. No steady rise has
begun, but the bottom is past.
With conditions as they are, now is the time
to be 'making plans. How far is this return to
plentitude to go? Are we to have another seige of
pseudo-prosperity? Is one group of politicians
and financiers to be lauded for taking stones from
the bottom of our national financial structurie and
piling them on top to form a shaky though impos-,
ing heap; while another group is censured because'
it was caught underneath when the stack toppled?
If ever this country has needed a leader, it will
need one when the "return to nc rmalcy" begins
to become inflation. It is easy tog find a strong
man in a crisis--volunteers pop up lmost without
bidding. An emergency is concrete, and easy to
face because of the emotional exhiliration.
But to cry "halt" when everyone is eager to
continue, when the danger is remote and no one'
wishes to believe it exists, requires a different
sort of courage and a rarer type of man. It will
mean much to the United States and to the world
if we have such a president two years from now.

(The Daily Northwestern)

When a person is in grammar school and higi
school, the attainment of a degree, manifest by tw
mysterious letters after one's name, is the ultimat
objective of college. The name John Jones, A.B.
carries tremendous significance; it implies personal-
ity, power, and a consummate intellectual capacity.
Unfortunately, this attitude toward a degree is
carried over into college. The majority of student
still cling to their naive conception of the potency
of that decoration sheepskin which is handed to
them at commencement and which automatically
confers upon them the degree of A.B. or B.S. They
have completed the four-year course in large-scale
production of culture and are now in possession o
the document which is the "open sesame" to succes,
and fame. They will hang this sheepskin on the
wall like thousands of John Joneses have done before
them, and in six months the glamour will have al
departed. They will settle down into the rut and try
to eke out an existence in competition with millions
ofd other bachelors of art and science.
The average student body is merely a herd of
sheep, shoved in the fall of their freshman year into
a pen of prescribed training, fattened and clipped for
four years by a series of mechanical courses, and
then turned loose on the pastures of modern, high-
speed existence with the benison of their alma mater
Students should be made to see that they are not
being educated by allowing themselves to be molded
into the standard, mass pattern without any outlet
for individual expression or opportunity for the
leisurely absorbing of the rich heritage of culture
which is theirs by the grace of great men who have
gone before them.
If the university would only adopt some plan
similar to that of vagabonding which has been fre-,
quently discused in these columns, we feel sure that
those students who have a more intelligent striving
for a degree, would be eager to take advantage of the
opportunity. For the rest of the common clay, we
soy only this: the opportunities are there waiting
for you to seize upon them, but you probably are too
lazy to lift your hand to reach for them.

NlI We Have
)emocrat Control?

n portant.
r In the east, he says, the Roose-
velt "boomers" argue he could car-
ry the west, in the south they talk
about him as being 'strong in the
east, and in the west they point
a to his strength in the south.
o That completes the circle.
e Whatever may be the facts about
all that, the 'Roosevelt adoption
movement in;Georgia is a little
hard on the junior senator from
s that state, Walter Franklin George.
Inspiring High Hopes.
There was a great deal of talk at
the time he came to the senate in
e 1922 as to the possible political fu-
f ture of this tall, distinguished-
s looking Georgian. '
He could not have been blamed if
e he harbored hopes of a presidential
1 nomination.
That would have made a eupho-
nious campaign battle cry: "George
of Georgia."
Yet Senator George seems rather
out of the 1932 picture at this writ-
ing.
He can hardly expect even a com-
plimentary vote from the Georgia
delegation in the convention if
Georgia is to play sponsor for her
1adopted son, Franklin Roosevelt.
Senator George does not seem to
permit any disappointment he may
feel at the turn of events to keep
him out of the pre-campaign do-
ings.
The Bystander observed the fer-
vor with which he engaged in that
favorite democratic p a s t i m e of
blaming the Hoover administration
for existing economic distress. He
was very emphatic about it, speak-
ing in his home state.
Possibly the vice president chair
is attracting the senator's atten-
tion. ,
There is a lot of democratic vice
presidential lightning rods sticking
up-Lewis in Illinois, White in Ohio,
"Alfalfa Bill" Murray in Oklahoma,
to say nothing of Joe Robinson in
Arkansas and a lot more. Why not
George of Georgia?
The political friend the Bystand-
er referred to, who happens to be
a democrat, contends that he de-
tects a difference in the attitude of
his party colleagues this year, the
democrats of the rank and file,
from most previous pre-election
periods of the last double decade.
Defeatist Complex.
"Usually," he says, we democrats,
loudly as we may whistle, have had
a defeatist complex. We've been
licked so often.
"And when in our hearts we have
felt we were due for another lick-,
ing, picking a presidential nominee I

YEHUDI MENUHIN,
Feb. 4, 8:15.

PERCY GRAINGER, Piano, Feb.
19, 8:15.
R O S A PONSELLE, Soprano,
March 7, 8:15.
ORGAN RECITALS every Wed-
nesday, 4:15.

-ffi

Violin,

W ITH A MAJORITY of two votes as a result
of the five special elections held Tuesday to
fill vacancies in the House, the Democratic party
probably goes into power for the first time since
1919. It is a certainty that fireworks can be looked
for when tle session convenes in December.
The slim majority which the Democrats now
have, can be taken in two ways. The party natur-
ally predicts a tendency on the part of the electoral
body to support it in the future and optimism is
at its height in the Jeffersonian ranks. Any faction
which has been out of power for 11 years takes
that attitude and rightly so. A two-vote majority,
however, can prove a boomerang and it is entirely
possible that a detrimental effect can result.
When the House meets next month, the Speak-
er and all committee chairmanships will go to
Democrats, mostly to those from the solid south-
ern states; Democratic majority on all committees
will also be affected. On the surface, the party -is
quite safe. Yet it has been a common practice in
American politics to vote independently and the
ascendency which the Democrats have effected
can be erased in this manner. If there is a con-
'stant switching of votes, practically nothing
worthwhile can be accomplished and in next year's
elections Republican cohorts can point to their
opponents and loudly decry their ineffectiveness
in doing anything worthwhile.
It would he nathetic if such a+hins ho- -a

OF POPULAR EDUCATION

(Minnesota Daily)
Not complimentary to our educational system are
the results of a survey conducted by the Variety
Magazine to test the average American's familiarity
with contemporary celebrities. The mechanism of the
test was extremely simple. Each of 200 adult persons
on the streets of Chicago was given a list of 150 sup-
posedly well known names. Attached to each list
were instructions to identify the persons named.
If Chicagoans are typical in their information, or
misinformation, about what is going on in the world,
the fears .of pessimists for the future appear to be
fully warranted. What of a world which knows
more about Fatty Arbuckle than it does about Gand-
hi; a world in which nearly everybody recognizes the
names of Texas Guinan but puzzles over that of
Colonel House? Adding humor to the tragedy of
ignorance revealed in the test were assertions that
the Mayo brothers are a circus team, and that Yehudi
Menuhin is the oldest man in the world.
A phenomenon disclosed in all sets of answers

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