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November 05, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

DAILY

iT S NUTRIE
teck Industry Recovers;
liry and Poultry Prices
Shows Increase.
)PS YIELD BETTER

Fights Losing Battle
for Longworth Seat

- - ANJ'OU FATHG~&.D
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fl'A rMOQ~EY A(-L SOU Z
bNe: \AJO- we 1TvK-(M xe
NOTB' Novi 40tA -so s&cRA~M
A, licu c1-
I'0

B E SiTCE S VCVJ <ALS
i -IN'CS6T oc S __-
Thc LOK l
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C);, '/0 ToT.VE ITO CAie t -S SSAS1FU--~
TfNG GA- - t - i - Mos-r EIHTE r
ro T~OT-A ,&. ~ ST~&~

I

NOw- P1l1
OCMf tOEA(R

New Prosperity Felt as Gold
Rushes Begin in Montana
Sand Wyoming.
DENVER, Colo., Nov. 4.-(/P)-Re-
newed 'life is stirring in the Rock-
Wis. New quests for gold are po-
1ling ghostly cities. The livestock
industry i recovering, while dairy
nd poultry price increases are en-
courging the farmers.
Production in sugar beet factor-
es is reflecting exceptional autumn
therdand laying the basis for
'tdactivity all along the
business line. Onion growers are
0xpecting three to five times last
year' prices.
Sheep receipts on ' Denver
narket are two. weeksahead of
last year,' with production costs
idwn 20 per cent.1
Oil drilling is stimulating pop-
iiation and business in northeast
N rado and bringing employment
1 idle hands. Wyoming farmers
are looking forward to $5,000,000
'rom potatoes, beans and ugar
1eets. Montana is enjoying im-
toved prices for corn, barley, tur-
keys, butterfat, eggs and hay, and
L lower wheat yield is offset by
ugh protein content worth a pre-
nim'of-4 cents or more.
, provement Shown.
Telephone subscribers through-
ut the mountain region are in-
>easing. .Air companies are ex-
landing. Extensive road operations
re under way.
Cash 'distribution of $19,375,000
S forecast for the beet crop, whi&h
3ressed 21 of the factories of the
reat western sugar company to
ecord production. '
The nPew activity in gold mining
s tentered in Colorado and Moi-
an.Fixed prices for the precious ,
ietal,F e pled with reduced m e
ipe'rating 'expenses, has brought
enewed life to such famous, bIit
ng neglected districts as Cripple
reek, Boulder, San Juan, Clear'
,reek and Gilpin counties. Goldj
:quipment companies are correc,
pondigly busy.
Dredging operations are getting
Va4er way in Alder Gulch in Mon-
ana, the most famous of the early
Jlacer camps; at Pioneer, another
Ite of territorial industry; and a1n
Ancoln Gulch, where many thou-j
aid doilars worth of the metal
t0s been mined and panned. Many
fc the older quartz claims again
re producing.
There is revival of activity in
Welters which were closed earlier
a the year. On Sept. 15 the1
W nrican Smelting & Refinirxg'
lo.'4 plant at East Helena, Mont.,
ne oaf 'the largest in the country,t
Osumed ope'ations on a limited
asis after a three-month shut-t
own. .
The phosphate plant of the An-w
conada Copper Mining Co., at An-
conda, reopened in October with
ospect of operating through the
inter and well into the spring.
Reopening of a smelter at Lead-
ille, Colo., late in September for
n indefinite period put 125 men
apk to work. At Peublo, Colo.,
ue steel mills of the Colorado Fu 1
SIron Co., showed renewed signs
' activity after a slack summer.
Department store trade showed;
asonal increase i September
hich brought the volume to u
ttle short of average.
The Western Air Expess report-
' 'for the first 10 'nxon th an in-
ease in business volume of 71 per
t over the same period last year.
birty men were added to the coM-
any's payroll in Denver.

I

7/I~o-3i

EARLY STRAP TRACK RAILS OFTEN
POKED HOLES THROUGH CAR FLOORS

AssociaU P rmUeh
David Lerbach, democrat, who
was defeated by a decisive vote in
the recent election. Lorbach was
running for congress in the first
Ohio district, the seat which was
left vacant by the death of speaker
Longworth. .
Physical Education Club Party
to Be Given in Women's
Athletic Building.
The Men's Physical Education
club will hold a dance from 9
o'clock until 12 Saturday night in
the Women's Athletic building, it
was announced yesterday by lar-
mon A. Wolfe, chairman of the
committee.
Cowan's band will play for the
dance, which is open only to mem-
bers of the club and- their guests.'
Names of the guests must be turn-
ed in to the committee and a check
list will be given the doorman.
Members of 'the club include the
captains of the football, baseball,
basketball, and cross-c o u n t r y
teams.
Among the service projects which
the club is planning ,for the coming
year is distributions of Fielding H.
Yost's interpretation of the Michi-
g'an sportmanship code at all
games.
Mitchell Will Speak
at Society Convention
Phi Epsilon Kappa, national pro-
fessional physical education frater-
nity will hold its annual get-to-
gether meeting tonight at 7:30
o'clock in room 302 at the Union.
Elmer D. Mitchell, associate pro-
fessor of physical education and
director of intramural sports, who
with Dr. George May, director of
Waterman gymnasium, was re-
sponsible for the installation of the
chapter, will give a talk. Laverne
Taylor, president of the 1931 edu-
cation class, and Webster Randolph
of the intramural department willa
also speak.

Prof. Worley Describes Travel
Hazards of Early Rail
His ory.
Back in the days when grand-
mother was taking her first train
ride, snakeheads" were common
nui scances. The train tracks were
very different from what they are
now. Instead of being steel rails
they were "strap rails" or strips of
steel which were nailed to wooden
bases to form a track for the train,
Prof. John S. Worely of the trans-
portation library stated. T'iese
strips of steel although tightly
spiked down at first would gradu-
ally lossen up until the ends of the
rail strips would turn up. After
enough trains passed over them
these ends curled up until, instead
of going over the track, the train
wheel would go under it. The point-
ed end of the strap rail would then
pass up through the floor of the
coach, seriously damaging the car
and disturbing its occupants and
grandma. The strip of steel tended
to curl up inside the coach, thus
the common terminology "snake
head."
But why mention "snake heads"
now? Professor Worely, curator of
the Pransportation library, has
placed upon exhibition in the lower
hall of the Engineering'"building a
Lecture Will Concern
Causes of World War
"The Spark That Started The
World War" will be the subject of
an illustrated lecture to be given
under the auspices of the Tolstoi
league by Prof. F. S. Onderdonk of
the Education School at 4:15 o'clock
Tuesday afternoon, in room 231
.Angell hall.I
Dr. Onderdonk's lecture will be
the first of a series of three talks
to be given on subjects relative to
Tolstoi's philosophy, sponsored by
the society of those who adhere to
his religion here.
The second and third of these
lecture will be "Lenin, Tolstoi, and
Ghandi," to be given by Dr. Fred-
erick B. Fisher Tuesday, Nov. 24,
in Natural Science auditorium; and
"The Battle Creek Way to Health"
to be given by Dr. A. B. Olson, of
the Battle Creek sanitarium, Tues-
day, Dec. 10, in the Natural Sci-
ence auditorium.

piece of the old strap rail and dia-
grams drawn by draftsmen of the
Michigan Central railway which
explain the nature of the "snake
head" and how to guard against
it. Therblue prints are dated 1850,
and were furnished for the exhibit
along with the rail by Art Flanders
of Middlevalle, Michigan who se-
cured themn from hts fathe(r who
had been a pioneer reident of
Michigan.
It is especially interesting to note
the old strap rails weighed about
five pounds to the foot while rails
recently laid by the Michigan Cen-
tral line average 42 pounds to the
foot.
Local Scheols Make
Esucation Week Plans
Ann Arbor schools will join with'
the rest of the nation in observing
National Education' Week, sched-
uled for November 9-15.
In an effort to promote national
interest in education, three import-
ant organizations are sponsoring
the movement. With the assistance
of the National Educatic:^ Associa-
tion, the American Legion promul-
gated the first education week in
1921. The idea was an outgrowth
of the World War, which disclosed
the extent to which Americans
were lacking in knowledge and skill
to serve the country in a crisis. On
invitation of the Legion and the
Association, the United States office
of education became one of the
backers of the project,

I Tcy Plans Prosecution Against
The Three CoI'ingswood
Ave. Slayers.
DETROIT. Nov. 4.-- (AP-The trial
of Ray Bernstein, Harry Keywell
and Irving Milberg on a charge of
slaying three racketeers in Col-
lingwood Ave. apartment house
Sept. 16 was resumed in record-
er's court today.
A visit by the jury to the apart-
ment house where the slayings oc-
curred and the presertation in
court of several new eye-witnesses
was planned by Prosecutor Harry
S. Toy. Several of the persons who
saw the slayers escape from the
apartment house will be asked to
attempt to identify thebdefendants.
The defendants are being tried
for the slaying of Joseph Sutker,
one of the three victims. The oth-
ers were Hymie Paul and Joe Lebo-
vitz. Harry Fleisher, thehfourth
man' named as a slayer, has not
been arrested.
Thompson Will Speak
Over U. of M. Station
Prof. Milton J. Thompson of the
Aeronautical engineering- depart-
' ment of the engine school will
speak over WJR this afternoon at
2 o'clock. The title of Professor
Thompson's address will be "Recent
developmentsdinAeronautics."
'"My talk will be a non-technical
discussion of recent discoveries F
concerning a r transportation."

Laundry drop
FOR RENT opposite Angell
_. 'THESES TYPE
FOR RENT-Single rooms, attrac- Call 5568 afti
tive, comfortable, reasonable. ITAI-
9314 Greenwood. 236 SITUATION wva
wife as cook a
r- ---- man. Woman

box at Barbecue
Hall. 200c
D - Miss Conkey.
er 6. 240
anted by man and
And porter or house-
n good reliable eco-
Will take reason-
Reference. Box A-6
213

FRuiSA1LE

nomical cook.
able wages. F

I

REPOSSESSED CARS-Buy from
finance company for balance
due. 311 W. Huron. Phone 22061.
235
BULOVA wrist watch, bearing
initials H. F. Return. to Henry
Fiferman, 1302 North University.
Phone 5949. Reward. 239

STUDENT LAUNDRY WANTED--
Called for and delivered. Phone
4863. 150,
WANTED
WANTED-Student laundry. Also
bedding. Reasonable prices. Soft
water. Call for and deliver.
Family Washings. Phone 707-
F-31. 53c

NOTICE

IDEAL LAUNDRY CO.
204 North Main Phone 3916

Nature's Drink to Health-
ARBOR SPRINGS WATER
It's clean! It's pure! Your physician recommends it! That's
why we say; " Drink Plenty of Arbor Springs Water for Your
Health's Sake."

Delivered to your home in case lots of
6 2-quart bottles.

We can also supply you with chemically pure distilled water.
ARBOR SPRINGS WA TER CO.
416 West Huron Phone 8270

,.
....®..w._.
......
.T
) 1 . .
- --- ,, . ""-a-.. ..
----- _

I

C

It Took Reductions As Great
As $15 To Reduce Our

'F,."

Har~t,sc Sealiner

NOW
PLAYING
LEWIS DORIS
STONE KENYON
PHIBLIARRY'S GREAT STORY
-ALSO
BO0Y FRWNIDS HEARST SOUVENIRS
"CALL A COD" NEWS CARTOON
SAT .-JOHN GILBERT "ARNTOIS"

& Mrx

MAX
FISHER

with
William Haines
a Waiora
Jimmy Durante
IUNLST TUOIRENCG

and his

I

CAJi f,'?NJANS

]X1IL-A IYAMS

$1,000,000 WOR TH OF FUN!
-__ ---CQMJNG SUNDAY---
GRETA GARBO - CLARK GABLE
in SUSAN LENOX

Down to 1916 Levels

-1

SPECIAL!
EXTRA PANTS FRI-E
SUITS $25, -ii, 9$35
All Guaranteed' to Fit
CHA. DOKS
1319 South University
TATRE
Friday-Saturday
.USPTCES PAYER LEAGUE
IF you are discouraged,
if you tAink you are
a failure see
Crosby Gaige's production of
Channing Pollock's great play

. . .R: ,
--_ - - -
{

I

0

n:.
, r

EXCEPTIONAL
VALUES

(,(,ENSIAN PHOTOS

I

IN FALL
AND WINTER
APPAREL

Now's

the Tilme

II

SUITS and
OVERCOATS

Ran da I l

$15 00

6

I

Hats, $3.50, $5.00j

121 East Washington

Studio

m :

I

x lll

W!

fill

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