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October 25, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-25

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TAM M W, A'vA

III-

P .. .. .., ,. .

Michigan

Sororities to

LEAGUE BA[LLROO'M
WILL BESCENE UOF
AFFAIR' - 'TOMORROW
Scholarship Cup to Be Awarded
to Pi Beta Phi for Third
Consecutive Year.
O. J. CAMPBELL TO SPEAK
Houses to Sing Songs Between
Courses; League Orchestra
to Play.

In Charge of Banquet

:i

I

4
4.
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44.

Twenty-one sororities will gather
at 6 o'clock tomorrow night in the
main ballroom of the League for
the seventh annual Panhellenic
banquet. The affair is sponsored by
the intersorority association in or-
der to foster friendly relations be-
tween the houses, to presergt for-
mally the pledges, and to award
the scholarship cup.
Cup to Be Presented.
Josephine Timberlake, '32, presi-
dent of the Panhellenic association,
will act as toastmistress, and the
first event on the program will be
the presentation of the scholarship
cup by Ira W. Smith, registrar, to
Pi Bet Phi. Thishouse has won the
cup for three consecutive years,
and has earned the right of per-
manent possession.
Following, the award, Miss Alice
C. Lloyd, dean of women, who acts
as advisor for the association, will
speak, and she will be followed by
Prof. O. J. Campbell, whose subject
has not been announced.
In accordance the traditional
custom, each sorority will sing One
of its songs between courses. Music
will be furnished by the League
orchestra. Amplifiers will be set up
throughout the ballroom.
Thirty at Speakers' Table.
Guests of honor will be seated at
the speakers' table, and they in-
clude Miss Lloyd, Mr. and Mrs. Ira
W. Smith, pean Joseph A. Bursley
and Mrs. Bursley, Prof. 0. J. Camp-
bell and Mrs. Campbell, Dean W. D.
Humphrie, and Mrs. Humphries,
Dean John R. Effinger and Mrs.
Effinger, Mrs. John Wannamaker,
Miss Jeanette Perry, Mrs. Byrl Fox
Bacher, Miss Ethel McCormick,
Miss Ellen Stevenson, end Dr. Mar-
garet Bell.
Also seated at the table will be
Katherine Koch, '32, president of
the League, Lois Sandler, '32, vice-
president, Dorothy Elsworth, '32,
president of the Women's Athletit
association, the officers of the Pan-
hellenic association, and the mem-
bers of the central committee for
the banquet.
Emily Bates, '32, was general.
chairman for the affair, and she
was assisted by Josephine McCau-
sey, '34, Evelyn Neilson, '33, Bea-
trice Ehrlich, '32, Dorothy Norris,
'33, and Elizabeth Gribble, '33.
Sororities are asked to enter the
ballroom immediately upon arriv-
ing. The guests of honor will gather
in the Grand Rapids room at 6
o'clock, and will enter last.

-Photo by Dey Studio
Emily Bates, '32, general chair-,
man for the seventh annual Pan-
hellenic banquet which will be held'
at 6 o'clock tomorrow, night in the
main ballroom of the League. Miss
Bates is also president of Mortar-I
board, senior honorary society. 1
AU T HOR PLACES DO
WITH BEST OF 1

Elizabeth Wycoff Admires
Immensely Interesting
Views on Life.

Her

'"Dorothy Canfield Fisher has
been a famous novelist for nearly
twenty years now, and every year
or so something interesting has ap-
peared over her signature," states
Elizabeth Wyckoff in an article in
a recent issue of the Bookman mag-
azine.
"That she and her thought are
so much a part of the mental back-
ground of most American women is
one good reason why as a novelist
and literary personage she has not
been taken seriously. She has
phrased theories of life which most
.people cherish as ideals, and many
more think they do. It is difficult
to separate the literary craftsman
in her work from what there is no
better word for than therpropa-
gandist - a fluent+ and creative.
propagandist, to be sure, but al-
ways advancing some immensely
interesting, adventurous or coura-
geous way t6 live," shecontinues.
"It is undoubtedly probable that
Mrs. Fisher is not at all troubled
by the lack of literary recognition.
Fashions in Movie
Sirens Change With
Succeeding Decades
Fashions in vamps have changed
in the last decade, and now there
is no set style, according to Ruth
Tildesley in a recent Screenland. In
the old days the determined siren
reclined on a tiger rug amid burn-
ing incense. That was enough.
The modern methods are more
frank and yet more subtle.
Gay indifference pl u s smart
clothes, smart conversation, and
good fellowship are Lilyan Tash-
man's formula for trapping the
modern man. Greta Garbo lets no
man be sure of her. Joan Craw-
ford believes that the spirit of
youth and adventure sweeps men
off their feet, but George Arliss
adds a final note in declaring that
the truly dangerous woman pos-
sesses innate charm, poise discern-
ment, and refinement.

MICHIGAN WOMAN li
DIRECTSBUSINESS
Marie Root, '14 Manufactures
Road Scrapers.
"Marie Josephine Root, class of
'14, is the only woman in the world
engaged in manufacturing road
scrapers," according to an article
in the latest issue of the Alumnus.
She is vice-president and general I
manager of the Root Spring Scrap- th
er company of Kalamazoo. lJiss ba
Root came to Michigan after her sir
graduation from Western State A
Teachers' College. Upon leaving in
Michigan, she taught school for a ed
few years, took a post graduate les
course at Columbia, and then an
helped her father in his work at Nc
the office. At his death in 1925, Miss lik
Root entered her present position. Ur
Although extremely feminine in qu
every way, Miss Root believes that del
marriage and a career do not mix de
well. She is a member of Collegiate th
Sorosis, the Kalamazoo Chamber of ye
Commerce, Altrusaclub, the Ameri- m
can Road Builders' Association, and
is very active in the Michigan
Alumnae Association of Kalamazoo.
Mrs. Oliver Stewart, A.B., class of I
'92, visited the campus last week
for the first time since her gradua- R
tion. She came to Ann Arbor with
her husband who spoke Tuesday at
the Prohibition Forum.
ROTHY CANFIELD pe
VOD ERN NOVELISTS p
in
If she had wanted to lead a lifein es
the literary circles she would have sh
stayed in New York. But her own
detachment is no reason for ignor- to
ing or taking her for granted," Miss wi
Wyckoff says.
"To leave Dorothy Canfield Fish- ne
er out of a serious discussion of
the American novel is becoming a
little more than ridiculous. As a ra
matter of fact, she belongs in the an
succession of novelists that begns O'>
with George Eliot and continues if
with Mrs. Humphrey Ward. All
their novels are full of motherly
understanding and tolerance of hu-
man beings," she declares.
Some of Dorothy Canfield Fish-
er's best books include "The Squir-
rel . Cage," "The Bent Twig," "The
Brimming Cup," and "The Deepen-
ing Stream," her latest novel.
Cornell Awards Daily
Positions for Points
Women at the University of Cor-
nell are to be given three months
opportunity to try out for positions
on the woman's editorial board of
The Cornell Daily Sun. The com-
petitiors will be rated on a point
system depending on the number
of stories published, initiative
shown, and quality of work offered.
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Phone 23414

I

MIRACLES HAPPEN,
STATESLILY PONS
Famous Opera Star Describes
.,Romance of Life.
"Miracles do happen," says Lily
Pons to Rose Heylbut during an in-
terview which Miss Heylbut wrote
for the American magazine.
Miss Pons, who, at twenty-six, as
an opera star, proves there is still
plenty of glamour and romance in
work well done, says the writer.
At the age of fourteen, Lily Pons,
entered the piano department of
the Paris Conservatoire and there
made splendid progress, but be-
cause of ill health was forced to
abandon this work. At eighteen she
found an opportunity to take small
parts in a very eminent stock com-
pany. Then at twenty she was
married. Those first months of
married life offered her leisure time
so she again took up piano and
singing. Her husband encouraged
her to take vocal lessons. That was
the beginning, affirms Miss HIeylbut.

r-
American Made Watches
NEW SYTLES
AND
NEW LOW PRICES
"Ask Him and He'll Say 'Elgin"'
1 T 1 t" i

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