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October 25, 1931 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-25

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

U4t Mtc4 toutDaitla
Published every morning except Monday during the University yeaf
the Board in Control of Student Publications.
Member of the Western Conference Editorial Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled to the use for re-
blication of all news dispatches credited to it or not otherwise
dited in this paper and the local news published herein.
Entered at the Post Office at Ann Arbor, Michigan, as second
as matter. Special rate of postage granted by Third Assistant
etmaster General..
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard Street, Ann Arbor,
chigan. Phones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
RICHARD L. TOBIN
Itorial Director..........................BachConger, Jr.
ty Editor ........................Carl Forsythe
we Edtor .................................David M. Nichol
orts Editor ......................S.......Sheldon O. Fullerton
omen's Editor ..........................Margaret M. Thompson
Teen Reflections.........................Bertram J. Askwith
aistant News Editor .. ...................... Robert L. Pierce

the immigrants are made lawless by America rather
than that America is made lawless by them." (If I
remember rightly, the Wickersham committee on
crime concurs in this opinion.)
Mr. Adams continues: "Our heritage is in some
part from our Puritan ancestry, North and South.
The Puritans insisted that their own ideals of life
and manners should be forced on the community
at large, and they also believed that any desirable
change could be brought about by legislation. Partly
from Puritanism and partly from the exaggerated
influence attributed to the legislatures in Colonial,
days, Americans have believed that ideals should be
expressed in the form of law, regardless of the prac-
tical question of whether such laws could be en-
forced. They have apparently considered that the
mere presence of such laws will help respect for the
ideal of conduct, regardless of the fact that the
presence of such unenforceable laws will bring about
disrespect for law itself. Every minority which has
had a bee in its bonnet has attempted to make that
bee "home" into a law, and to a remarkable extent
the majorities have not cared, partly because they
take little interest in public affairs, but mainly be-
cause they imagine that even if some 'fool law' is
passed they can disobey it if they choose, as they
have others. Because we have ceased to have any
respect for law we allow any/sort of laws to be
passed, and then-the vicious circle continuing-our
disrespect increases yet more because of the nature
of such laws. When Americans talk about their glor-
ious past, it may be well for them to remember that
we have one of the most sinister inheritances in this
matter of law from which any civilized nation could
suffer, a heritage that we are apparently passing
down to our children in a still worse form. For this
reason, if for no other, I believe that the unenforced
and unenforceable 18th Amendment was one of the
heaviest blows ever directed againt the moral life of
any nation."

B. Gibreth J
IGoodman
Karl Seiffert

NIGHT EDITO
J. Cullen Kenne

RS
edy James Inglis
Jerry E. Rosenthal
George A. Stauter

ilber J. Myers
an Jones

riley W. Arnhebn
wson E. Becker
>mas Connellan
rnuel G. Ellis
ruel .L. Finkle
is B. Gascoigne

Sports Assistants
John W. Thomas
'V
REPORTFRS
Fred A. Huber
Norman Kraft
Roland Martin
Henry Meyer
Marion A. Milczefski
Albeit H. Newman
K. Jerome Pettit
Georgia Geis'man
Alice Gilbert
Martha Littleton
Elizabeth Long
Frances Manchester
Elizabeth Mann

John S. Townsend
Charles A. Sanford
John W. Pritchard
Joseph Renihar
C. Hart Schaaf
JBrackley Shaw
Parker R. Snyder
G. R. Winters
Margaret O'Brien
THilary Rarden
Dorothy Rundell
Elma Wadsworth
Josephine Woodhams

othy Brockman
am Carver
brice Collins
ise Crandall
e Feldman
dence Foster

BUSINESC STAFF
Telephone 21214

a:
a:
a
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or
Al
ir
9

ILES T. KLINE...........................Business Manager
IS P. JOHNSON.........................Assistant Manager
Department Managers
tising . ....r ........Vernon Bishop
tiing ................................Robert B. Callahan
tising ...................'.....William W'. Davis
e .................................Byron C. vedder
cations...............................'William T. Brown
lation ..................................Harry R. Begley
WAs..'..x........... ................Richard Stratemeier
en's Business Manager . .................... Ann W. Verner
Assistants
Aronsen Willard Freehling Thomas Roberts
rt E. Bureley Herbert Greenstone R. A. Saltzstein
rd A. Combs John Keyser Bernard E. Schnacke
Clark., Arthur F. Bohn Graf ton W. Sharp
ve Dalberg Bernard H. Good Cecil E. Welch
t E. inn James Lowe
a Becker Anne Harsha May Seefried.
ha Jane Clisset Katharine Jackson Minnie Seng
vieve Field Dorothy Layin Helen Spencer
ae Fischgrund Virginia McComb Kathryn Stork
Gallmeyer Carolin Mosher Clare Unger
Harriman He dlen Olsen Mary Elizabeth Watts
Helen schmeede

I

I SCand DRAIIA

_.......

L,

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NIGHT EDITOR-ROLAND GOODMAN
SUNDAY, OCTOBER 25, 1931
The Mimes Opera
Comes to Life Again
M1IMES, according to announcements last week,,
has gone back to its original field of effort,
the production and presentation of a student-
written opera with an all-niale cast. After two
yea'rs of doubt both within and without the society
as to the ultimate disposal of the organization with
its fine traditions arid its array of student dramatic
talent, the question has been settled for this season
at least with the decision to put on a locally writ-
ten opera.
With a great deal of caustic criticism during
the past several years as a guide in shaping their
efforts for the current production, the committee
in charge of this year's show will avoid violating
some of the offenses for which Mimes has been
criticised. With the financial failures of the most
recent operas well in mind, there will obviously
not be an unlimited supply of funds at the disposal
of the director, which has been comparatively true
of former years. This economizing on expendi-
thres will obviate the two most serious charges,
professionalism and lavishness.
The current production should give conclusive
proof whether an opera run on the traditional lines
of the first offerings of the Mimes opera can be
successful in the present campus theatrical setting.
Operas in the early years were known to run for a
week before packed houses in Ann Arbor and then
go out on the road and come back with a very
substantial contribution to the finances'of the then
embryonic Michigan Union. This year's opera
will be directed by a young instructor in the
speech department, whose interest in the organiza-
tion is of the same nature as the undergraduate
members. Elaborate lavishness will not be the
keynote of the presentation but rather a highly
finished presentation of what has been termed a
witty and cleverly constructed book. I

III

SERGE KOUSSEVITSKY
M. A. DeWolfe's book commemorating the fiftieth
anniversary of the founding of the Boston symphony
orchestra contains interesting biographical material
on Serge Koussevitsky who Tuesday night brings the
Boston Symphony Orchestra to Ann Arbor for the
first time in fifteen years.
Mr. DeWolfe says: "When he came to Boston in
1924, Koussevitsky's western European reputation was
not of long standing, for until after the war he had
found his own vast land sufficient for his activities.
Tver, a remote northern province of Russia, had giv-
en him birth in 1874 and the inevitable Petrograd
Conservatory had been his Mecca as a lad. There,
every pupil was required to study some instrument
for the orchestral class. He chose the double bass.
The young man withdrew into a corner with his
monster, and emerged, discoursing delicate tones
such as neither students nor teachers bring forth
from double basses. Before very long, he was going
about with his instrument, astonishing every one as
he drew his solid bow fist-wise across the strings,
with the subtlety of a great cellist. The day that
he performed his own concerto at the Leipzig Ge-
wandhaus under Nikisch was one of those sweet
memories of a first general recognition.
It must have been with something of the same
sudden, inexplicable genius that he mastered the
Orchestra. Again, the boy who chooses this extra-
ordinary instrument, while another prodigy follows
the ready-cut career of a violin virtuoso, has become
the conductor who shuns routine and welcomes the
unusual in his repertory. Still again, the Kousse-
vitsky who coaxes such melodious eloquence from an
intractable double bass is the leader who can play
upon a string section, over-persuade what resistance
of indifference there may be in sixty men assembled,
and bring forth a songfulness which is the standing
wonder of the Boston Symphony strings.
Possessing independent means, Koussevitsky was
able to organize his own orchestra in Petrograd, take
it to Moscow, and give in each city "festivals," choral
concerts, and series advancing contemporary Russian
music. Then came those fantastic exploits of the
pioneer and apostle-the summer voyages two thou-
sand miles up the Volga when he took his orchestra
from village to village in the rural heart of Russia,
agitating the peasantry with Beethoven and Scriabin.
From 1917 to 1920 Koussevitsky acted as director of
the subsidized State orchestras. But things did not
go smoothly, for he was not in sympathy with the
communist movement. It was as conductor of the
Concerts Koussevitsky in Paris with his own orches-
tra, and as guest conductor of the London Symphony
orchestra that he attracted the direct attention of
the Western world.
In 1924, Koussevitsky was invited to take the
podium at Boston. His first program was a Vivaldi
concerto, Brahms' 'Haydn Variations,' Honegger's
'Pacific 231,' and Scriabin's 'Poeme d'Ectase.' Since
that time he has, of course, done wonders. If there
is a single trait which will encompass everything
notable Koussevitsky has done, it is his tireless capa-
city for enthusiasm. Assimilating the music of youth
and its point of view, he believes in it, with all his
being. And he carries the same eager attitude toward
that music which the world has heard too often. He
can always study, freshly conceive. He has studied
the Orchestra as musicians and as men; the public
with their manifold inclinations and responses; and
found with both a rapport which grows with the
seasons, as does Boston's indebtedness to a great
conductor."
"BRIEF MOMENT"
Guthrie McClintic, one of the consistently success-
ful American producers, is giving his new show a
week's trial engagement at the Cass Theatre in
Detroit before opening it in New York. The show has'
several points that nearly guarantee it as worthwhile.
It is a comedy, "Brief Moment," by S. N. Behrman,
author of such splendid things as "The Second Man,"
"Meteor" and "Serena Blandish." And then starring
in it is Frances Larrimore, late of "Chicago" and
"Let Us Be Gay.' And then, up on the stage making
his debut as an actor will be Alexander Woolcott, the'
very nearly ancient critic of the New York theatre.
The supporting cost includes Louis Calhern, Paul
Harvey, Frances Rich and Helen Walpole. Jo Miel-
ziner has designed the setting. The play is running1

What's
Going
On
SUNDAY
Michigan-G e o r g e Arliss in
"Alexander Hamilton' with Doris
Kenyon, and June Collyer.
Majestic-"My Sin" with Fredric
Marsh and Tallulah Bankhead.
Wuerth-Jack Holt in "Fifty
Fathoms Deep."
Concert -University Symphony
orchestra will present program at
4:15 o'clock in the Hill auditorium.
Congregational Church-Dr. Al-
bert W. Palmer, president of the
Chicago Theological seminary, will
speak at the morning service on
"Building a Friendly World," and
at the evening service on "The In-
evitable God and the God We
Choose."
University Broadcast - "Reading
for Modern Parents" by Dr. Kath-
erine B. Greene, professor of edu-
cational Psychology. "University
News of the Week" by Prof. Waldo
Abbot of the English department.
Week day program will be broad-
cast at 2 o'clock. Saturday pro-
grams at 8 o'clock. And Sunday
programs at 5 o'clock.
MONDAY
Michigan-George Arliss in "Alex-
ander Hamilton" with Doris Ken-
yon, and June Collyer. Joan Craw-
ford in "Paid."
Majestic-"My Sin" with Fredric
Marsh and Tallulah Bankhead.
Wuerth - J a c k Holt in "Fifty
FathomsDeep."
Pan-Hellenic Banquet at 6:30
o'clock in the ballroom of the
League.
Student Press Club will meet at
8 o'clock in the League.
University Broadcast-"The Ro-
mance of the Gothic Cathedral" by
Ross T. Bittinger, instructor in the
School of Architecture.
TUESDAY
Michigan-George Arlis in "Alex-
ander Hamilton" with Doris Ken-
yon, and June Collyer.
Majestic-"My Sin" with Fredric
Marsh and Tallulah Bankhead.
Wuerth-Jack Holt in "F i f t y
Fathoms Deep."
Choral Union Series-B o s t o n
Symphony orchestra at the Hill au-
ditorium at 8:15 o'clock.
Scabbard and Blade Banquet at
6:30 o'clock.aProf. Thomas H. Reid
will speak on "Theodore Roosevelt."
UniversityBroadcast - "Chorea-
St. Vitus Dance" by Dr. R. W. Wag-
goner, assistant professor of 'Neu-
rology.
WEDNESDAY
Michigan-George Arliss in "Alex-
ander Hamilton" with Doris Ken-
yon and June Collyer.
Majestic -Richard Barthlemess
in "The Last Flight."
Wuerth --"Misbehaving Ladies"
with Lila Lee and Ben Lyon. Wal-
lace Beery in "The Secret Six."
University Broadcast - "U n c 1 e
Sam's New Forests in Michigan"
by Prof. Willett F. Ramsdell of the
School of Forestry and Conserva-
tion.
THURSDAY
Michigan - Buster K e a t o n in
"Sidewalks of New York."
Majestic - Richard Barthlemess
in "The Last Flight."
Wuerth --"Misbehaving Ladies"
with Lila Lee and Ben Lyon. Wal-

lace Beery in "The Secret Six."
University ' .Lecture -"Athenian
Vases and T h e i r Painters" by
Charles Seltman, lecturer in classi-
cal archaeology, Cambrdge univer-
sity, England at 4:15 o'clock at the
League.
Faculty Women's Club luncheon
from 3 to 5 o'clock at the League.
University Broadcast - "Modern
Production Miracles" by Prof. A. P.
Gwiazdowski of the Engineering
school.
FRIDAY
Michigan-Buster K e a t o n in
"Sidewalks of New York."
Majestic -Richard Barthlemess
in "The Last Flight."
Wuerth-Ken Maynard in "Two
Gun Men." Third episode of "Dan-
ger Island."
Union Dance-Don Loomis and
his band.
League Dance--Gail-Corbett and
their popular League orchestra.
University Broadcast--"The Story
of Geodesy" by Prof. Thomas J.
Mitchell of the department of geo-
desy and surveying.
SATURDAY
Michigan-Buster K e a to n in
"Sidewalks of New York."
Majestic-"Spirit of Notre Dame"
with Lew Ayres.
Graduate Club Luncheon at 1:15
in ballroom of the League.
Union Dance-Don Loomis and
his band.

Musical
Events
All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium u n l e s s otherwise
noted. The afternoon concerts
are g i v e n without admission
charge.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA; David Mattern,
Conductor, Oct. 25, 4:15.
BOSTON SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Serge Koussevitzky,
Conductor, Oct. 27, 8:15.
M A U D OKKELBERG, Piano,
Nov. 1, 4:15.
HANNS PICK, 'cello, WASSILY
BESEKIRSKY, Violin, JO-
SEPH BRINKMAN, Piano,
Nov. 8, 4:15.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
'ORCHESTRA, DAVID MAT-
TERN, Conductor, Nov. 15,
4:15.
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Pi-
ano, Nov. 17, 8:15.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, Violin,
MABEL ROSS RHEAD, Piano,
Nov. 22, 4:15.
THE REVELERS, James Melton,
1st tenor, Phil Dewey, baritone,
Lewis James, 2nd tenor, Wil-
fred Glenn, bass, Frank Black,
Director and Pianist, Dec. 3,
8:15.
L A U R A LITTLEFIELD, So.
prano, December 6, 4:15.
THE "MESSIAH" by Handel,
University Choral Union, Uni-
versity Symphony Orchestra,
Soloists, Earl V. Moore, Con-
ductor, December 13, 4:15.
DETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Ossip Gabrilow-
itsch, Conductor, Dec. 15, 8:15.
DON COSSACK RUSSIAN
CHORUS, Serge Jaroff, Con-
ductor, Jan. 13, 8:15.
DETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Dr. Rudolf Siegel,
Guest Conductor, Jan. 25,
8:15.

YEHUDI MENUHIN,
Feb. 4, 8:15.

PERCY GRAINGER, Piano, Feb.
19, 8:15.

R 0 S A PONSELLE,
March 7; 8:15.

ORGAN RECITALS every Wed-
nesday, 4:15.

UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN,

/

Oratorical Association

Presents

Rara6el Sabatini
Author of
¬ęScaramouche," "Sea-Hawk," "Captain Blood," "King Maker"
Martin and Osa Johnson
America's best known African explorers
Bertrand ussell
Philosopher, Essayist, and Publicist

¬įIll

I

C;AM~US OPIINIION

J

4

i

_

PROHIBITION
By M. Levi
(This is the fourth of a series of articles on prohi-
bition by M. Levi, professor emeritus.)
The writer from whom I wish to quote next isj
James Truslow Adams, author of The Founding of
New England and other volumes on American history
including The Adams Family, Our Business Civiliza-
tion and, of that recent success, The Epic of America,
which is said to be the best single volume on Ameri-
can history in existence. Mr. Adams is also a frequent
contributor to the magazines..
In the book referred to, Our Business Civilization,
the author has devoted a whole chapter to our Law-
less Heritage. Parts of this chapter read as follows:
"The question is frequently asked, 'Is the 18th
Amendment making us a nation of lawbreakers?' If
it is intended to ask whether many people are dis-
obeying the law and whether the amendment is
helping to break down respect for law itself, the
answer is emphatically yes.... Any law that goes
counter to the strong feeling of a large part of the
population is bound to be disobeyed in America. Any

John B. Kennedy
Associate Editor and Radio Announcer, Collier's
George W. Wickersham
Chairman, National Commission on Law Enforcement
Winston Spencer Churchill
Brilliant .British Statesman and Orator

t

- l

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AT 3211 ANGELL HALL BY OCTOBER'26 TO RECEIVE FIRST
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$2.50; $3.00; AND $3.50.
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