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October 24, 1931 - Image 6

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-24

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PAGE 81X

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1931

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DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN
Publication in the Bulletin is constructive notice to all members
of the University. Copy received at the office of the Assistant to
the President until 3:30; 11:30 a. m. Saturday.
VOL. XLII. SATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 1931 No. 24
NOTICES

Members of the Faculties, Administrative Officers, and Office Em-
ployees: The Faculty Dir.ectory for 1931-1932 is being mailed today to
members of the Faculty at their house addresses. Since the names have
been checked with the official records for title, and since the central
offices are using this directory as an official list, it is particularly desir-
able that any errors or ommissions be reported at once to the Editorial
Division, 108 Mason Hall (Campus Exchange 374).
Ira M. Smith, Registrar.
Students' Recital: The School of Music Symphony Orchestra, David
Mattern, conductor, will give the following program, Sunday afternoon
at 4:15 o'clock in Hill auditorium to which the general public with the
exception of small children is invited.
Verdi: Overture to "The Force of Destiny"; Tschaikowsky: Concerto
for Piano No. 1 Allegro non troppo e molto maestoso (Elsa Eppstein)
Bruch: Kol Nidrei; Beethoven: Concerto for Piano No. IV (Allegro Mod-
erato) (Stanley Fletcher); Smetena: Three Dances from "The Bartered
Bride" 1. Uolka; 2. Furiant; 3. Dance of the Comedians.
Campus use of palms, ferns, and other decorative plants from the
Botanical Gardens are provided to. the extent that the limited green-
house space permits. Other demands on the greenhouses prevent the
production of enough ornamental plants to supply all the demands.
Many requests therefore have to be refused. In order to save the plants
for the more appropriate occasions, it is necessary to adhere closely to
the rule that they cannot be supplied for purely social gatherings of the
faculty or students, for private offices on the campus, or for student
activities except under the conditions defined below.
An attempt is always made to provide as well as possible for official
events; for meetings at which some group or organization of University
officials, faculty members, or students represents the University as host
to a university guest or visiting organization, or is perfoming some other
direct service to the University, such as raising funds for one of its
approved projects; for student events of an educatonal nature and public
entertainments to which no admission is charged; and for the various
libraries and administrative offices. No charge is made for the use of
plants. H. H. Bartlett.
EXHIBITION
Architectural Building Exhibition: An exhibition of oriental fabrics
and a number of batiks by decorative design students is now hung in
the ground floor cases of the College of Architecture. It will be shown
for ten days, and is open daily except Sundays from 9 to 5. Visitors are
cordially invited.
MEETINGS TODAY
Second In series of lectures in Bibliography offered by the Depart-
nent of English will be given at 9 a. in., 2225 A. H. H. C. Hutchins.
A.A.U.W.: Professor Arthur S. Aiton, of the Department of History,
will speak to the members of A.A.U.W., at 3 p. in., in the Grand Rapids
room of the Michigan League. He will relate some of his experiences
during the Revolution this summer. Women graduate students and all
University women now living in Ann Arbor who are eligible to A.A.U.W.,
are cordially invited to attend.

Interpretive Arts Society to be held
Wednesday, Oct. 28, at 7:30 p. in.,
in Room 302 Mason Hall. All persons
interested are cordially invited.
Philippine-Michigan Club: Regu-
lar meeting at Lane hall, Sunday,
3 p. m. Members may invite only
Filipinos to thisomeeting.
Baptist Guild, Sunday 6:30. Miss
Allene Bryan, of New York, repre-
senting the world service depart-
ment of the denomination will talk.
Meeting at Students' House, 503 E.
Huron.
Wesley Hall: "Religion and Stu-
dent Life" is being discussed by the
University Freshmen under the
leadership of Prof. George Carroth-
ers, Sunday at 12 o'clock. Other
undergraduates meet with Dr. E. W.
Blakeman upon the subject "Reli-
gion of Jesus" and at the same time
our post Graduates have a forum
of Religion with Tom Pryor, '26, as
chairman.
At six o'clock, Guild Devotional
Meeting. Marian Whitney, chair-
man. Topic for discussion "Prob-
lems of Prohibition"-leader, will
be Charles W. Melick.
St. Andrew's Church Services: At
8 a. m., 9:30 a. m., and 11 a. m. The
Rev. Henry Lewis will preach on
"Religion and the Family."
Harris Hall: There will be no
Sunday breakfasts at the Hall until
further notice. The class on "The
Christian Philosophy of Life" con-
ducted by Rev. Henry Lewis will
meet at the Hall at 9:30 a. m. Sup-
per at 6 o'clock. Dean Bursley will
speak to the students at 7 p. m.
Any Episcopal student who has
not receivedan invitationto the
Banquet for the New Episcopal stu-
dents on Oct. 29, and wishes to
attend is cordially invited. Will they
please call the Hall and make their
reservation.
First Presbyterian Church: Sun-
day class for freshmen, men and
women at 9:30 a. m., at the church
house. Subject "An introduction to
the Bible," under the leadership of
Alfred Lee Klaer. The class of '35
is most welcome.
Morning worship at 10:45. Dr.
Kearns of Flint will preach the
sermon.
Student class for Upperclassmen,
12 to 12:45, at the church. Professor
Leonard O. Andrews is leading a
course in "Ethical Issues in Current
Events." Everyone is welcome.
Social hour at 5:30 p. in., in the
church parlors followed by supper
and Student Forum. Special music
is being furnished by Professor P.
0. Potts.

ON P ERSONALITIES
Editor Will Tell How Another
Battle May Be
Averted.
Kirby Page, editor of "The World
Tomorrow" and author of "Nation-
al Defense," will deliver a lecture
to students and faculty Tuesday
afternoon in Natural Science audi-
torium. The subject of his talk will
be "How Can Another War be
Averted?"
Page has recently returned from
a trip through central Europe and
Russia with a company of writers
and investigators and is now on a
lecture tour of universities and col-
leges. As well as giving glimpses
of conditions in Russia and Ger-
many, he will discuss personalities
prominent in present day politics.
Prof. Calvin O. Davis, of the Edu-
mation school, will preside at the
lecture, which is sponsored by
groups interested in world peace.
Following his lecture here, Page
will give a similar address in Cfii-
cago.
Mexican Ambassador
to Be Allowed Liquor
WASHINGTON, Oct. 23. - (P) -
Reports that the Mexican embassy
was to come under the pale of pro-
hibition were all wrong.
Assurance that the embassy's
guests would find alcoholic bever-
ages still available after the arrival
of Ambassador Jose Manuel Puig
Casauranc are given in his own
magazine, "Resumen," copies of
which have reached Washington.
Much discussion was caused in
diplomatic circles when the report
reached this capital the new am-
bassador would be absolutely dry.
"Resumen," published by La Razen
Co., of which Ambassador Puig is
president, has this to say:
"Some American newspapers-
making it appear as a statement of
Dr. Puig Casauranc-have said the
embassy of Mexico in Washington,
during his term as anbassador,
would be absolutely dry. That is to
say, that the prohibition law would
govern, by the desire of Dr. Puig
in the embassy of Mexico.
President Garfield said he felt
the $12,000 spent twice each year
for week-end festivities could be
directed beneficially in t o other
channels,

PAGE TO LECTURE

Schnitzler Receives
Burial Like Pauper's
VIENNA, Oct. 23. - (P) - Arthur
Schnitzler, who died Wednesday,
leaving the world richer for his
writings, was buried today in a
pauper's coffin like a man without
a friend.
It was at his own request, ex-
pressed in a codicil to a will written
20 years ago, directing that no one
wear mourning and that the funer-
al be of the "very least," or pauper
class.
There were no wreaths, no obitu-
ary announcements and no honor-
ary pallbearers. Only a bouquet of
blazing chrysanthemums relieved
the stark simplicity of the rough,
wooden coffin.
But it was not, after all, a pau-
per's ceremony. The writer's friends
came from far and near. Literary,
artistic, diplomatic and official cir-
cles were represented and their
luxurious cars blocked the roads
outside the cemetery.
ILLINOIS PREPARES
FOR MICHIGAN TILT
Injury May Keep Captain Hud-
son Out of Third Conference
Game of Season.
(Continued From Page )
the Illini into camp by a 70 mar-
gin.
Led by the flashy Gil Berry, the
Illini backfield should prove a stiff
test for Michigan's defense.In the
game against Bradley last week
both Berry and Evans made several
long gains, Evans especially starr-
ing in a series of sparkling broken
field dashes.
All during the week the Illini
have been brushing up on an aer-
ial attack, and inasmuch as Michi-
gan has devoted almost all its time
to improving its offense, a wide
open game in is prospect. TheZup-
pkemen were beaten last year by
two of Newman's frequent passes,
and will be guarding against a re-
pitition of such an occurence this
season.
The starting lineup for Illinois
probably will consist of Frink and
Marriner, ends; Jackson and Glick,
tackles; Nusspickel and Jensen,
guards; May, center; Walser, quar-
ter; Berry and Cook, halves; and
Murray, fullback.

SEATTLE, Oct. 23.-(P)--Col. and
Mrs. Charles A. Lindbergh began
the last stage of their homeward
trip from the orient today and ex-
pected to reach New York by air
Friday night.
Arriving at Victoria, B. C., early
today by steamer, they boarded a
borrowed airplane and flew here in
46 minutes, arriving at 7:08 a. m.
(10:08) a. m. After atbrief stop they
hopped eastward at 7:32 (10:32)
planning to land at Boise, Ida., for
fuel.
VICTORIA, B. C., Oct. 22.-(A')-

LINDBERGHS START ON LAST STAGES
OF HOMEWARD JOURNEY FROM EAST

Col. and Mrs. Charles A. Lindbergh
left here at 6:22 a. m. (9:22,a. m.)
for Seattle by airplane after arriv-
ing by steamer from the orient,
where their air tour was ended by
the recent death of Mrs. Lind-
bergh's father, Senator Dwight W.
Morrow of New Jersey.
The steamer President Jefferson,
returning Col. and Mrs. Lindbergh,
arrived here at 3:55 (6:55). Vance
Breese, pilot who brought the Lind-
berghs a plane to be used on their
trans-continental flight, went on
board the ship after warming up
the plane's motor.

FIRST CHURCH OF, CHRIST SCIENTIST,
ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN
announces a
Free Public Lecture on Christian Science
by
SALEM ANDREW HART, C. S. B.
Cleveland, Ohio
Member of The Board of Lectureship of The Mother Church, The First
Church of Christ, Scientist, in Boston, Massachusetts.
Sunday Afternoon, October 25, 1931
at 3:30 o'clock
In Masonic Temple, Fourth Avenue
THE PUBLIC IS CORDIALLY INVITED TO ATTEND
the fingerle operated res-
taurants Introduced a new
almond itoffee ice
cream mde especiallyfor
nr
us by the ann arbor
dairy rice creamco'.
this ice cream will be wide-
ly copied in ann arbor.
the den w the tavern " the hut

i

h. .I

I

Psychology 42: An examination
will be held in Room 2129 N. S., for
those absent from examination inj
Pschology of the Abnormal.
W. B. Pillsbury.
Beta Kappa Rho party at 8 p. m.,
in the League. All invited to attend.
The "Upper Room" Bible Class
meets at 7 p. in., in the "Upper
Room" at Lane hall. All University
men cordially invited. The "Upper
Room" Bulletin may be secured by
calling at Lane hall.
Cosmopolitan Club: Annual ini-
tiation of new members, 8 p. m., in
Lane hall auditorium.
All those who have signed appli-
cations for membership are request-
ed to appear on time. Those who
wish to' become members but who
have not yet signed applications
may do so by coming to Lane Hall
half an hour before the initiation
meeting begins.
The initiation ceremony will be
followed by a musical program and
refreshments.
Masonic Students: The Craftsmen
Club meeting at 7:30 p. n., in the
Masonic Temple. Important that all
Masons attend for assignment of
parts.
Catholic Students: A mixer for
Catholic students and their friends
will be held in the Ballroom of the
Michigan League building from 3 to
5. Radio report of U. of M. and Illi-
nois game during party.
COMING EVENTS
Economics 171 (W. A. Paton) :
Rooms for the examinationato be
given Monday, Oct. 26, 1 p. m, are:
A-J inclusive-N. S. Aud.
K-R inclusive-1025 A. H.
S-Z inclusive-25 A. H.
History 11 (B. H. Wheeler): Make-
up examination, Tuesday, Oct. 27,
from 3 to 6 in Room 221 A. H.
Scabbard and Blade banquet cele-
brating the National Scabbard and
Blade Day, Michigan League, 6:30
p. m., Tuesday, Oct. 27. Professor
Thomas H. Reed will speak on
"Theodore Roosevelt." Active and
former members of Scabbard and
Blade, here and elsewhere, may
purchase tickets at the R.O.T.C.
office no later than 5 p. m., Mon-
day, Oct. 26. Meeting will be ad-
journed in time for concert.
Kirby Page, editor of "The World
Tomorrow," will speak at a Peace
Mass Meeting in the Natural Science

i -
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MICHIGAN DECORATIONS

BANNERS
PENNANTS
STICKERS
JEWELR Y
BOOK ENDS

SONG BOOKS
CALENDARS
STATIONERY
PLAQUES

At
AH UNIVERSITY
BOOKSTORE
A MICHIGAN INSTITUTION

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