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October 24, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-24

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ATURDAY, OCTOBER 24, 193

THE MIC14TGAN

DAI E-.

PAGE FIVP

! 1IF TI -T A LD ./Y Vtl1l1IZiaT 1JYf

_.AOF rV.

W. A. A. Membership Campaign

Culminates in

Outdoor

Trail

ALL WOMEN HAE
EOUA CHANCE TO
lOIN ASOIATO
Women Are Considered Inactive
Until They Have Earned
Five Points.
NEW PROJECT PLANNED
Dorothy Ellsworth Heads Drive
for New Members of
Organization.
Culmination of the intensive three
day Women's Athletic Association
membership campaign will take
place this afternoon when members
of the organization gather at Pal-
mer field house at 2 o'clock for the
outdoor trail. This function will
give those who wish an opportunity
to earn their five units which they
must win before they are consider-
ed active members. These points to-
gether with one dollar entitle any
woman on campus to membership.
The campaign took place from
Oct. 21 to Oct. 24. Dorothy Elsworth,
'32, president of W.A.A. headed the
drive in which she was assisted by
Susan Manchester, '32, chairman of
the campaign committee, Elsie G.
Feldman, '33, Harriett Bonsttetter,
'34, Jean Berridge, '33, Caroline
Hyde, '34, Helen Manchester, '33,
Katherine McGregor, '34, and Mary
G. Spaulding, '34.
W.A.A. Formed In 1903.
W.A.A. has grown from a mere
League committee as it was in 1890
to one of the most important or-
ganizations on the campus. In 1905
it was formed as a separate body;
and in 1917 the committee on stu-
dent affairs formally accepted the
constitution. The first indoor meet
was held in 1903 and is now one
of the most anticipated events of
the association. The organization
sponsors programs in both the out-
door and indoor seasons and also
fias charge of the Lantern Night
in which all women on campus
take part and the Penny Carnival.
Besides these functions there are
meetings, spreads, and banquets. At
the latter awards and numerals are'
presented and the all-star teams
are named.
Only Actives Can Vote. '
All women are considered inactive
members of W.A.A. until they have
their five points and paid a dollar.
The actives only are eligible to take
part in the election of officers which
occurs in the spring. They are also
privileged to wear the W.A.A. blue
flannel jackets
Plans to Build Cabin.
At the present time the associa-
tion has a definite project in mind.
Plans have been made to build a
log cabin on University property
near the city. So far $1,000 has been
raised and in order to obtain addi-
tional funds, an ice carnival will)
be held some time in February. Thisf
affair will be part of the outdoor
sports program.]
To supply the need for unity in'
the various sports and to further
types of recreation which would'
increase association among the'
women was the Association formed.
It is now the ideal and purpose'
of the actives to form a club whicht
will be on a par with any suchi
organization in the United States.

:i

SOCIETY
Pink and green, the sorority col-
ors, will be the decorative back-
ground for the pledge tea to be
given Thursday afternoon by Delta
Zeta. Miss Barker will pour. Satur-
day night, the sorority will hold its
annual Founder's Day banquet.
Betty Cronin will be toastmistress.
All the active members and Ann
Arbor alumnae-will be present at
the candle lighting service, a fea-
ture of the dinner.
Gamma Phi Beta wishes to an-
nounce the pledging of Georgina
Carlson, '35, Detroit, Michigan. The
anniual pledge tea was held Wed-
ensday afternon by the sorority.
Last week end, visitors at the chap-
ter house included Mary Ann Joslyn,
Helen Kumerow, and Helen Bush,
from Detroit.
Delta Delta Delta wishes to an-
nounce the pledging of Avis Pitts,
'33, of Cleveland, Ohio. Eleanor
Yeagley is chairman of the plans
made for the tea to be held by the
pledges this afternoon.
Sorosis will entertain the faculty
members and their wives at dinner
tonight. The guests expected are
Dean and Mrs. Joseph Bursley,
Dean and Mrs. John R. Effinger,
and Dr. and Mrs. O. J. Campbell.
The sorority will honor the, pledges
at a formal dance Saturday night,
at which Mr. and Mrs. Robert C.
Angell and Mrs. William Roberson
will be chaperones.
MOSHER ELECTS
NEW PRESIDENT

DR. MARGARET BELL BELIEVES THAT
PHYSICAL TRAINING AIDS LEADERSHIP

W.A.A. Offers Fine Opportunity
for Women Interested
in Recreation.
"A large part of the original lead-
ership shown by women students on
this campus has been the result of
training received from the limitless
projects conducted by the Women's
Athletic Association," said Dr. Mar-
garet bell, advisor in physical edu-
cation for women, in connection
with the Membership Campaign
being carried on by W.A.A.
"During the nine years I have
spent here, I've noticed that many
of the women who become out-
A RUE ATTENDANCE
REPORTED AT T.EA
More Than Three Hundred Wo-
men Entertained at First
League Party.
More than three hundred women
attended the first of the monthly'
League afternoon parties yester-
day in the main ballroom of the
League, according to Miss Ethel
McCormick, social director.
Most of the guests were fresh-
men, who attended in the groups
into which they were divided dur-
ing Orientation week. A prize had
been offered to the group which
has perfect attendance, but no
complete groups were reported, so
the award will not be made.
"We are very pleased with the at-
tendance at the affair," stated Miss
McCormick, "and we only hope
that interest in the parties will
keep up in order that we may have
a large attendance at- each one."
The arrangements were made by
the social committee, which con-
sists of Catherine Heeson, '33,
chairman, Parrish Riker, '33, Betty
Eaglesfield, '33, Margaret Ferrin,
'33, Eleanor Walkinshaw, '32, Mar-
garet O'Brien, '33, and Josephine
Woodhams, '34. Miss McCormick
assisted the committee, and thea
League board of directors acted'
as hostesses.

standing members of their classes
are W.A.A. women. Since one of the
main objectives of education is to
develop intelligent leaders, the Ath-
letic Association fulfills an import-
ant function," she continued.
Dr. Bell further stated that the
W.A.A. has definite ideals and offers
a well organized opportunity for
development of leadership especial-
ly for those interested in recrea-
tional leadership. W.A.A. has begun
to stress the outdoor sports as may
be seen from an examination of the
program mapped out for this year.
The outdoor trail to be held today
will start the events. One Saturday
in November will be devoted to an
outdoor game; in December and
January skiing and tobogganing
will occupy the foreground; arn ice
carnival will be held in February,
and a kite day in March. The other
months have not been planned as
yet. For those interested in hiking
there will be a Rambler's club. Cul-
inary artists may join the outdoor
Cooking club; ,and there will be
other small groups as well. On the
last Saturday of each month, the
groups will meet together.
The Women's Athletic Association
stresses recreation more than exer-
cise, continued Dr. Bell. However a
certain amount of skill is necessary
to the enjoyment of any game or
exercise and a woman will only
pursue some form of outdoor sport
throughout her life when she en-
joys it because she can do it well.
The reason for the difference in
the health of men anti women of
the adge of forty-five is due to the
fact that men have always been
more interested in physical'exer-
cise. Women are just beginning tol
realize the importance of outdoor
activity as a valuable contribution
to physical and mental well-being
and appearance.
Delta Omicron Society
Entertained at Dinner
Members of Delta Omicron, musi-
cal sorority, patronesses 'and alum-
nae were guests at an Oriental din-
ner given by Mrs. Alexander Dow
at her home in Barton Hills. After
the dinner the guests played bridge.
Mrs. J. T. Hewett and Miss Ruth
Weiler from Detroit were also pre-
sent.

COMMITTEE EAD0S~
SELECT MEMBERS
FOR ANNUAL BALL
Jean Bentley, General Chairman,
Announces List of
Names. ,
DATE IS NOVEMBER 27
Attendance Will Be Limited to
Upperclassmen; Ticket
Sale Starts Soon.
Announcement or committee
members for the annual Panhell-
enic ball were made yesterday, ac-
cording to an announcement made
by Jean Bentley, '33, general chair-
man.
The selections are as follows:
Mary Barnett, '33, treasurer, Con-
stance Giefel, '33, and Charlotte
Moss, '34; music, Margaret Scher-
mack, '34, chairman, and Dorothy
Buoce, '33; tickets, Vinselle Bart-
lett, '33, chairman, and Betty
Eaglesfield, '33, Constance Berry,
'33, Jane Fauver, '34, and Reta
Pearl MacOmber, '33; decorations,
Eleanor Robson, '32, chairman, and
Dorothea Lane,, '32; refreshments,
June Slott, '33, chairman, and Mar-
jorie Schoultz, '33; chaperones,
Adele Ewing, '33, chairman, and..
M a r t h a Littleton, '34, Eleanor
Welch, '33, and Betty Covert, '32;
publicity, Agnes Graham, '32, chair-
man, and Corrin Fries, '34, and
Virginia Ladd, '33; programs, Leo-
nore Snyder, '33, chairman, and
Margaret Snyder, '33, and Lorraine
Bond, '34; floor, Marjorie Ells-
worth, '32Ed, and Anna Neberle,
'33.
The dance will be held Friday,
November 27, in the main ballroom
of the League. It will be strictly
an upperclass affair, for no fresh-
men will be allowed to attend un-
less the ticket sale warrants at a
later date.
Sororities must know the exact
number who will attend at a very
early date, as the tickets will be
limited.
The dance will last from 9:30
to 1:30 o'clock; and breakfast may
be served at the sorority houses
until 3 o'clock.

Hallowe'en Party
to Be Held Tonight
by Beta Kappa Rho
"In order to give the university
women who do not live in dormitor-
ies or league houses an opportunity
to make more social contacts," said
Miss Dorothy Ogborn, advisor to
Beta Kappa Rho, "this organization
was formed about five years ago,
and is sponsored by the Office of
the Dean of Women."
"Beta Kappa Rho plans to hold
about five parties this year," Miss
Ogborn continued, "the first of
which will be held from 8 to 11:30
o'clock tonight in the Cave at the
League. It is to be an informal
Hallowe'en party without costumes.
Some features of the entertainment
will be bobbing for apples, fortune-
telilng, and dancing."
Patronesses of the sorority are
Mrs. Franklin Shull, Miss Freder-
icka Gillette, and Mrs. Byrl Bacher.
Special guests at tonight's party will
be Mrs. Barbara Bartlett, Mrs. Fred-
erick Aldrich, and Miss Ethel Mc-
Cormick.
"We are particularly anxious to
have all women new on campus
present at the party tonight," con-
cluded Miss Ogborn, "as it will be
an excellent opportunity to become
acquainted.

BANOUET PROGRA60M
PLA1NS COMPLETED
Speakers to Be Named Tomor.
row; Chairman Gives Order
of Entrance.
Final arrangements for the an-
nual Panhellenic banquet, to be
held at 6 o'clock tomorrow in the
main ballroom of the League, have
been completed, according to Emily
Bates, '32, general chairman.
Miss Bates has requested that all
women go into the ballroom im-
mediately upon arriving, instead of
meeting in the lounges, as has been
done in former years. The guests
of honor will enter after all of the
sorority members have been seated.
Speakers and program will be
announce at a later date.
fashion says
SUEDE

Week-End

Ruth Robinson Chosen to
Sophomore Class.

Lead

Ruth Robinson, '34, was elected
president of the sophomore class in
Mosher hall Thursday afternoon.
This election completedthe selec-
tion of class presidents in both
Mosher and Jordan halls. The house
organization is now complete with
the exception of the appointment
of the members to the standing
committees as the chairmen have
already been appointed.
The standing committees in Jor-
dan include the scholarship com-
mittee, the social committee, the
health committee under the charge
of a registered nurse, the athletics
committee, the library committee,
and the music committee.

Special Sale.
of
FALL HATS
A large assortment of
head sizes and colors.
All sales final.
Jacobson 's.

IL

KAPPA PHI PLEDGES TWENTY-THREE
AT SERVICE LAST TUESDAY EVENING
National Music Sorority Honors Sigma Alpha Iota, national music
Members and Alumnae sorority, gave a tea Friday, Oct. 23,
at League Tea. in the Grand Rapids room of the
League in honor of patronesses and
Twenty-three women became the members of Lambda Alpha, Ann
pledges of Kappa Phi, national sor- Arbor alumnae chapter. Over sixty
ority for Methodist women, at the guests were entertained. In the re-
pledge service held last Tuesday ceiving line Virginia Forsythe, pre-
evening. sident; Burnette Bradley, vice-
Those taking the vows were: president; Betty Bentley, recording
Martha Cooper, '33, Elizabeth Walz, secretary; Mary Anne McDowell,
'35, Ruth Patton, '32, Marian Sweet, corresponding secretary; Margaret
'35, Doris Jaffe, '35, Lenore Caro, Hawley, treasurer; and members of
'32, Alice Adams, grad., Edna Miller, the social committee, Sally Place,
'33, Alberta Uren, '32, Lois Keddy, Gwendolyn Zoller, and Mrs. Ken-
'35, Carol Hart, grad., Mary Kim, neth Lloyd.
'33, Ethel Howard, '35, Evelyn Haw- Decorations were carried out in
ley, Spec., Naomi Flach, '32, Kath- the Hollowe'en motif. Fall flowers
ryn Brinley, '32, Portia Williams, '33, were placed about the room. At the
Maude Airey, '35, Loise Van Amer- tea table Mrs. Henry Bates, Mrs.
ingen, '35, Marion Shepard, '35, Pearl Reiman, Mrs. Benjamin Bai-
Emily Phillips, '35, Arline Howard, ley, Miss Nora Crane Hunt, Mrs.
'33, and Minnie Seng, '32. Hutzel, and Mrs. G. C. Huber pour-
Mrs. E. W. Blakeman is the new ed.

F

NOTICE
The following teams will play
in the third round of the in-
tramural ho c k e y tournament
Monday afternoon at 4 o'clock
at Palmer Field: Delta Gamma
against Martha Cook and Sigma
Kappa against Kappa Delta.

P

i
f
f

M usical
All programs are given in Hill
Auditorium u n I e s s otherwise
noted. The afternoon concerts
are g i v e n without admission
charge.
M A U D OKKELJ ERG, Piano,
Nov. 1, 4:15.
HANNS PICK, 'cello, WASSILY
BESEKIRSKY, Violin, JO-
SEPH BRINKMAN, Piano,
Nov. 8, 4:15.
UNIVERSITY S Y M P H O N Y
ORCHESTRA, DAVID MAT-
TERN, Conductor, Nov. 15,
4:15.
OSSIP GABRILOWITSCH, Pi-
ano, Nov. 17, 8:15.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, Violin,I
MABEL ROSS RHEAD, Piano,
Nov. 22, 4:15.
THE REVELERS, James Mehon,
1st tenor, Phil Dewey, baritone,
Lewis Jarmns, 2nd tenor, Wil-
fred Glenn, bass, Frank Black, i
Director and Pianist, Dec. 3,
8:15.
I, A U R A LITTLEFIELD, So-
prano, December 6, 4:15.
THE "MESSIAH" by Handel,
University Choral Union, Uni-
versity Symphony Orchestra,
Soloists, Earl V. Moore, Con-
ductor, December 13, 4:15.
DETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Ossip Gabrilow-
itsch, Conductor, Dec. 15, 8:15.
DON COSSACK RUSSIAN
CHORUS, Serge Jaroff, Con-
ductor, Jan. 13, 8:15.
DETROIT SYMPHONY OR-
CHESTRA, Dr. Rudolf Siegel,
Guest Conductor, Jan. 25,
8:15. '

OVER

Those stores through whose doors

more people pass each day

are the

ones

who faithfully present their products to

ARE THERE WEBS

YOUR DOOR?

the public.

Ihis is as true in Ann Arbor

sponsor for Nu chapter. She was
the former sponsor of Sigma chap-
ter at the University of California
for five years. Mrs. Blakeman was
the main speaker at the meeting
following' the pledge 'service, at
which time she introduced the
theme for the year.

4.

b - -- .- -.1--------- -, -71

SATURDAY SHOPPERS
Will Save at the
Collins Shppe
SPECIAL OFFER
on
DRESSES
AND SUITS
$1000
(formerly selling at $16.75)
FALL DRESSES OF JERSEY, WOOL
CREPE, TRAVEL CREPE, SILK.

i
i
E+i

...
ray
f l
.
.+
< :;
y:;
.,R :::
' :+;
''F%.

Where
Better
Apparel.
Costs
Less

Mark Twain; the famous humorist, in support of the public proclaiming

as in Oshkosh or Newark.

of merchandise once wrote;
"When I was a newspaper editor, a subscriber wrote me, saying he had found
a spider in his newspaper. He asked if it was a good or bad omen. I replied
that it was neither a good nor a bad omen. The spider was there in its own
interests. He was looking through the advertisements intent on finding out who
did not advertise. When he discovered a tradesman who did not advertise, he
was going-straight to his shop to spin a web across his front door, and for
evermore live an uninterrupted life."_____

r"

I

IN ANN ARBOR THE ONE BEST WAY TO AVOID
THESE WEBS OF INACTIVITY IS

Dresses
$10 and $12.50
Sizes 11 to 20
38 to 44

YEHUDI MENUHIN,
Feb. 4, 8:15.

Violin,

PERCY GRAINGER, Piano, Feb.
[ 9, 8:15.
R 0 S A PONSELLE, Soprano,

THROUGH

o

III

1111

11

I I

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