100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 23, 1931 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-10-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

>rmal

Outclasses

Michigan

Harriers,

22

to

NELL SETS NEWN
1ORD__OF 108
ns Place Five Men in First
Seven to Beat Michigan
for Third Time.
By John Thomas.
racing the State Champion-
Michigan Normal team, Roger
I lowered his own record and
ed into first place with a 100-
ead while his Michigan team-
were bowing in defeat to the
s for the third consecutive
resterday afternoon over the
mile cross country course, 22
nping himself as a leading
tant for the Big Ten individ-
le, Howell started fast turn-
the unusual time of 2:22 for
st half-mile and running the
ile in 4:54.
owell Outruns O'Connor.
natched strides with O'Con-
the Hurons for the first mile
ie half but drew away from
hen Bauer made his challenge
Ie two-mile post. Roger had
d by ten yards 4owever and
the post running easily. His
or the first two miles was
owell turned home he length-
is lead. His appearance on
.ield raised a cheer from the
He swept down the track
o one else in sight to lower
n record by nearly 20 seconds,
shing a new record of 15
s and nine seconds. Three
s clocked him at 15:08:8 but
cial timer said 9 seconds fiat.
Veather Aided Running.
ha Hoyt said that the-weather'
st warm enough to aid the'
g. Steve Ferrell, former track
was of the opinion after the
hat Howell gave one of the!
st exhibitions "-f sustained
g that will be seen on Ferry
or some time in his record-
ig jaunt.
r, who placed second in the
al Inter-collegiates 10-mile1
dst year, was timed at 15:33
and place. After he made his'(
the lead at the two-mile
e had dropped behind the
.eels of Howell with an ever-
ing distance between them.
>rmal Places Next Three.
omb followed his teammate
in third place with Kohler
Hill was the second Michi-
an to come in. He had kept1
o the leaders until the long
the mile and one-half mark-
then he had dropped behind.3
(Continued on Page 7)t

Monnett
State

of Michigan
Leads Scorers

f loLVERiES [AVE
FoR, IttLLINOs 9LA IR

Kipke Takes Three Full Teams
on Trip; Newman, Hudson
May Not Start.
Michigan's squad of gridiron war-
riors, 33 strong, left Ann Arbor last
night on the long trek to Cham-
paign for their annual battle with
the Illini. Still smarting from the
Buckeye defeat of last week, the
Wolverines wound up their grid
practice yesterday afternoon with a
snap and determination w h i c h
should be warning enough for the
Indians this week.
The men will spend the night on
the Pullmans enroute to Chicago
where they will stay until Satur-
day morning. A light workout this
afternoon on Stagg field will make
up the final drill before the Wolves
meet the Illini, Kipke announced.
The team will arrive in Champaign
Saturday noon.
Attempt Pass Defense.
Yesterday's drill indicated that
Kipke is taking no chances on a
surprise aerial attack, for the
Wolves were drilled most of the
session against Illinois pass plays
executed by the picked freshman
eleven.
Probable starters against the In-
dians will be approximately the
same team which faced the Buck-
eyes. Hewitt and Williamson at
ends; Auer and Samuels, guards;
Hozer and LaJeundsse, guards;
Morrison, center;Heston and Fay
at the halves; Capt. Hudson at full
and either Tessmer or Newman at
quarter. Hudson is a doubt:Kil start-
er due to a neck injury suffered in
the last game. If he is forced, to
remain on the bench, Kipke will
send Hewitt in at full and Petoskey
will get a chance at left end.
In Good Condition.
The men who make up the three-
team squad which is accompanying
Kipke includes: centers, Morrison,
Bernard, and Cooke; guards, Hozer,
LaJeunesse, K o w a 1 i k, Cantrill,
Douglass, Marcovsky, S i k k e n g a,
Oehmann and Frisk; tackles, Auer,
Samuels, Wistert, Goldsmnith, Chap-
man,and Miller; ends, Hewitt, Wil-
liamson, Petoskey, Daniels, and
Yost; quarterbacks, Newman, Tess-
mer, Westover; halves, Heston, Fay,
Everhardus, DeBaker, and East-
man; fullbacks, Hudson and Cox.
Outside of Hudson, the entire
Varsity is in the best of condition
and should be able to present a
strong front to the Illini.

Blocking May Settle
Mdicliian-llini Clash
Wolverines Drilled n Scoring
Plays for Saturday.
By Sheldon C. Fullerton
Michigan's lack of success in its
two Conference games against Chi-
cago and Ohio State can be at-
tributecd to three factors, poor in-
terference, poor blocking, and poor
field generalship. Throughout the
entire week Coach Harry Kipke
and his assistants, with even Field-
ing H. Yost again stepping in to
lend 4a helping hand, have drilled
these three phases of the game in-
to the players, in an effort to whip
the team into shap to meet Illinois
tomorrow.
Emphasis has been placed on
plays that will score a touch-
down for the Wolverines when
they once get inside an oppo-
nent's 5-yard line. So far this
year the Varsity has reached a
scoring position like this on
three different occasions, and
has failed in, each attempt to
cross the opponent's goal.
If drilling the players intensively
on this one phase of the game can
be expected to avert another repe-
tition of such an occurrence, it is
not likely that the Maize and Blue
will fail in another effort to score
a touchdown from such close quar-
ters.
The group of Michigan men-
tors has also worked overtime
to .try to teach the players the
arty of blocking, and of provid-
(Continued on Page 7)

SENIOR CIRCUIT SH
BETTER 1931 RE
By Fred A. Hub er.
The cream of the shortstops lay
heavily in the National League dur-
ing the 1931 baseball season. Many
of the American League clubs failed
to find a regular and were shifting
their short-fielders throughout the
year.
Charlie Gelbert, peppery short-
stop of the St. Louis Cardinals was
probably the outstanding man of
his class in the senior loop but with
an unusually good crop of players
in that league, his superiority may
lie in the fac(ithat he worked beside
the veteran Frankie Frisch, and a
good second baseman is a great ad-
vantage to any shortstop.
Jackson Did Well.
The veteran Travis Jackson, in-
field mainstay of the Giants played
superbly all season. His hitting was
timely and his defensive work was
certainly up to his former standard,
especially in view of the fact that
his team-mate at sceond base, a
large. percentage of the tine, was
Bill Hunnefield, a notoriously poor
fielder.
Dick Bartell was injured in mid-
seasonrand lost to the Phillies for a
month but when he was in the line-
up he played good baseball. Tommy
Thevenow, traded to the Pirates for
Bartell last winter, was the pro-
verbial tower of strength on the
defense, but at bat he never reached
full efficiency, finishing below the
. 50 mark in hitting. Another form-
eir Pittsburgh player, Glenn Wright
did a majority of the work for
Brooklyn, but he was harassed by
a trick ankle all year.
Duroeher Starred.
Probably one of the most improv-
ed shortstops in either circuit was
Leo Durocher, talkative lad withthe
Cincinnati Reds. Durocher, former-

ORTSTOPS MAKE
CORD THAN RIVALS

4 -CFINALS POSTPONED
Fischer and Dayton Will Meet
in First Half of Match
This Afternoon.
The finals of the All-Campus golf
tournament scheduled for yester-
day afternoon between Eddie Day-
ton and John Fischer were post-
poned until 1:30- this afternoon.
Eighteen holes will be played this
afternoon, with the other half card-
ed for Saturday morning.
Dayton's game has suffered con-
siderably because of a slight ill-
ness, and he wished an extra day
to get the sore spots out of his
system before tackling the lanky
sophomore star.
Fischer has been playing excep-
tionally well of late and would be
a tough customer for anyone not
right physically.
Dayton advanced to the final
round by victories over David, 1 up;
O'Brien, 8-6; and Oliver, 5-4. Fis-
cher found the going just as easy
in a 4-3 victory over Montague. In
the second round he disposed of
Johnny Howard, varsity star, 6-5,
then defeated Russ Oliver 5-4 to
gain his place in the finals.

- 4asociit ra i r'7ess PIoto
Leo Durocher
ly a good fielder and notably weak
batsman, found his hitting eye last
season and turned in the most im-
pressive stickwork of his major
career. The aged but still danger-
ous Rabbitt Maranville went his
placid way as a good shortstop for
the Boston Braves.
In the American League the, situ-
ation was reversed. Joe Cronin, the
Washington short-fielder, and com-
monly hailed as the best of the lot
continued his sensational hitting
and fielding. Lyn Lary, former star
(Continued on Page 7)

Associated Press Photo.
Bob Monnett, star halfback of
the Michigan State eleven, who has
run up a total of 84 points this sea-
son to establish himself as the
country's highest scorer.
Iowa Team Improves
for Gopher Contest
(Special to The Daily)
IOWA CITY, Oct. 22-Like a nov-
ice moving steadily towards matur-
ity under the influence of experi-
ence and practice, the University
of, Iowa's football team is advanc-
ing. towards its peak.
Unmistakable signs of that up-
swing were shown last Saturday in
the scoreless tie with Indiana, when
the offense clicked off 172 yards
from scrimmage and the defense
held the Hoosiers to 100 yards.
Now the Hawkeyes are develop-
ing further, fired by the opportu-
nity to become the third consecu-
tive Iowa team to down Minnesota.,

I

a

W
I
L
D
C
O

gA~
Ii4W' a at o- MPj

.. ,..W,

BUY, SHOES

0
N
S
T
E
S
T

ii

i

SUPERIOR

i

RIGHT NOW
at a Big Saving
See Page 3

I

MILK and ICE CREAM

I

SPECIAL BRICK

r

'I

VANILLA AND BANANA NUT
PUNCHES-FANCYMOLDS

eA

Phone 23181

ii'

TOPCOATS
To close out our entire Fall Stock

SPECIAL

. ,
.
_
:#
' .
E.
a
ja

(

CI
zI
. 3~

I

50

VALUES TO $35.00

y are all choice garments, fine Tweeds, hand tailored,
luxurious silk lining. 48.and 50 inches long. Truely
arvelous coat, the kind you would expect from this
ity store. We urge you to come early, as there are
fifty of these fine coats to be offered at this amazingly

'gym

I! I

100

price.

r

BROWN

4

Tails Come
Farther Front

213 East Liberty Street

SUITS

«_1

_ ..

I

ty Market

Just received,
tailored specially
for the C.,OL-
LEGE MAN by
Sparton at a
SPECIAL

Approval of the tailcoat has become
so general-that it offers the Tuxedo
some real competition.
There really can be so much said in
favor of them both-long graceful
lines and the charming modern man-
ner which formal wear of days Sone
by seem to always lack.
Tailcoat.........$3750, $50.00
The Tux.........$29.50, $35.00

rree
elivery

122 East Washington

Dial
7996

PRICE

SEE

OUR WINDOWS

&L CHOPS
LLED RIB ROAST
M4B CHOPS
UND STEAK

Walk
sI and

C

a Few Steps
Save Dollars
at

Both are Braeburn

.;

TI,(nm

0' I fINAL

afNnmQll

N r- ti v it CF 1

0

I

I

I

I

I'IftTL~I1~ 'L L ~ LUUII U ii IIi:

I

If

Back to Top

© 2021 Regents of the University of Michigan