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October 09, 1930 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-09

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

- I' MICH.I AN

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THVIllsr

pURDUE

PREDICT%

OL 0

OVEN

MICHIG

URDAY

STlrF DRILLS PUT
TERM IN CUNDIlTIOlN

THINCLADS GIVEN
LIGHT WORKOUTS

MACKMEN RUN AMERICAN LEAGUE TITLES
TO FOUR STRAIGHT BY HUMBLING CARDS

HOWVARD D
ROO IN

FE T
ATTLJ

S

Regular Drill Sessions
Early Next Week.

Begin

Kizer's Boilermakers P o s s e s s
Two Strong Backfield
Combinations.
VETERAN LINEMEN BACK
(By Bob McDonough, Sports Editor
of the Purdue Exponent.)
LAFAYETTE, Ind., Oct. 7.-Pur-
due is confident - not over confi-
d entor smugly self satisfied, but
secure in the belief that the Boil-
ermakers will put up a fight that
will bring victory when the Kizer-
men meet Michigan, Saturday, at
Ann Arbor. Every man on the Riv-
eter eleven realizes and respects
the strength of Kipke's gridmen
and is prepared to match that
strength with grim determination.
A cold, driving rain failed to
deter Coach Noble Kizer from send-
ing his men through a stiff work-
out tonight on Stuart field. Passing
drill and dummy scrimmage made
~up a large part of the practie, but
due to the mud little else was
accomplished. Freshman C o a c h
Harmeson has been drilling his
yearlings in Michigan offensive and
the Rhinie squad will probably be
called upon to scrimmage the vars-
ity tomorrow.l
Backs Show Power.c
Two backfield combinations will
undoubtedly see action Saturday.
The first composed of Jack White,I
cever quarterback and Alex Yune-c
vich the human dreadnaeght,
whose plunging played an import- '
ant part in last year's game, aret
the only remaining members of the3
famous "four riveters" combination
of 1929, while Lewis Pope and Jim
Purvis, two other letter en, wille
make up the first string foursome.
A reserve quartette of three let-x
termen and a sophomore fullbackf
has been displaying speed andv
drive that rate them almost on part
with the regulars, .however, andv
Weaver, Risk, Kissell and Horst-.
man can be depended upon tof
cary their share of the ball toting.-
K scell's 75-yard run to a touch-~
down against Baylor marks him asa
an outstanding half.
Reserves Look Good.
Purdue's forward wall from left
tackle to right is made up of sturdy
veterans. The two Georges, Van-
Bibber and Stears, will handle the
left tackle and guard posts, with
Lewis Miller at center and Jack
Christman and Buttner on his
right. Plenty of scrapping reserve-
line material have made this pro- -
lem an easy one for Kizer.
The wings present a Boilermaker
weak point. Paul Calvert, one of
the two experienced ends, will be
on the bench with a tackle shoulder
and the Purdue chief will be forced
to make his choice from a trio of
wingmen who have shown ability
at the end positions. Ed Moon,
letterman and Paul Moss and Dick
Bateman appear to be the most
likely candidates for the job.
VARSITY TRACK
All men interested in trying
out for the weight or jumping
events should report to Yost
Field House at 4:30 any after-
noon. Experience is no necess-
ary.
Coach Hoyt.
UNIVERSITY OF IOWA-Cham-
pionship contests in music, aca-
demic subjects, forensics, a n d
dramatics are expected to bring
75,000 high school visitors to the
university this year.

Preliminary work was begun thi.
week on the conditioning proces.
for varsity track aspirants undei
the tutelage of Coaches Ketz and
Doherty. At present the men are
merely taking light exercises and
striving to perfect their form in
their event;. Next week, with fur-
ther additions to the turnout ex-
pected, regular sessions will be held
under the watchful eyes of the
mentors.
Head Coach Charlie Hoyt is at
present engaged in watching the
football squad's physical- condition,
but next week plans to spend some
time with his thinclads. A new
man has been added to the coach-
ing staff this year in the person of
Ken Doherty of Detroit, winner of
third place in the decathlon in the
last Olympic games and holder of
the American record in this event.
Doherty will tutor the yearling
squad with his duties with the first
year men slated to begin next week.
It is planned to take each division
of a track team separately for in-
struction by Doherty, and later to
combine them into the freshmen
track team. Thus, the hurdlers,
dashmen, jumpers, etc. will each be
,taken apart for instruction, one
group at a time. Doherty was assis-
tant track coach at Princeton last
year.
The runners have not yet start-
ed the actual training, and the
weightmen are, without exception,
playing football which has left the
field to the hurdlers, jumpers and
vaulters. Four hurdlers have been
working out twice a week along
with several vaulters and jumpers.
Haeflee, Lamb, Egleston, and Kroen-
feld are the hurdlers with Hum-
phrey and Price being among the'
vaulters and Noyes and Kline
among the jumpers.
SOCCER SQUAD.
All soccer players are requested
to report at the Intramural
Sports building this afternoon
at 4:15.
Coach Johnston.

Connie Mack

TET SOCIETY' TO BECIN

Victories Over Gabby Street's
Aggregation Is Blow
to Nationals.
HUGGINS AIDED RECORD
Four victories in four years! Six-
teen wins out of the last 19 World's
Series games! Such is the record of
the American League in the base-
ball blue ribbon classics of 1927,
1928, 1929, and 1930. National
League enthusiasts were predicting
a Cardinal victory this year, hoping
that the string of junior circuit
wins would be brought to a close
by the team led by Gabby Street,
but instead the senior loop has
suffered just another reverse.
Two great managers have led
the American League teams
that have-compiled this record.
One of them, the late Miller
Huggins, passed away in the
prime o his managerial career,
but the other, the veteran Con-
nie Mack, rests content today
with the thought that his Ath-
itic team of 1930 is a truly
great one, because it showed its
ability to repeat.
It was a hard blow for Gabby
Street and his Cardinals to take,
comning as they did out of nowhere
to win the National League pen-
nant. The sporting world would
have thrilled to the story of how
the team from down under came
up to take the pennant and the
world's title, but it was not. to be.
That steady Athletic machine, with
its wonderful pitching and hard
and timely batting, had a little too
much stuff for the National League
standard bearers.
Prominent in the attack that
routed the Cards was the great
mound work of the Mack's star
right hander, George Earnshaw.
In the 25 innings that he pitch-
ed against the Redbirds he
allowed them just two runs. In
the second game of the series '
he was victorious by a 6-1 score,
in the fifth 'game he held them
to two hits and no runs in seven
innings, before being derricked
for a pinch hitter, while in
yesterday's contest he allowed
them just one more run.

Feature Match Goes 21 Holes
Before Decision.
Another long hard battle stood
out in the Varsity golf tournament
yesterday asnearly all of the lay
trs remaining in the ru nning swung
into action. The feature match of
the day, oe of th2 most thrilling
ol' battles ever sein in Ann Arbor,
went 21 h oles b. r! hoard was
abhle to gaini a dec-i ion over Rout.
Thre other first IrouJ nd mtches
and one in the secon)l were dis-
posed of in the day's play. Lenfesty
defeated Dayton, 4 and 3, making
a medal score o 75 -y completing
his round after hie Ibad6 won the
match. Capt. oyoi eked out a
1 up decision over Meniiee on the
last hole, and Loveland beat Penni-
man, 3 and 2.
In the only ,secund round match
completed iicks, lhi ii; his touch
again, overwhelmed Men Lague, a
fine golfer, 5 and 4. iobart will
meet Fischer today i te last re-
ma-ing first-round clash. The
competiion wVill be briu': down
to the semi-finals a soon as Poss-
ible, as the playing of these 336-hole
matches will require more tim's.
Howard made a game comntback
in his match with Rout. Refusing
to concede defeat alter being two
down with only four holes left to
play, he won the next two holes
to even the match, and then hulved
the next four in order. On the
(Continued on Page 'T)

National

B UCKEESTOK1
;PURPLE S'ATU9Hy
Indiana Upset Gives Ohio State
One Conference Game
io Its Credit.
EARLY SHOWING STRONG
(Byv Ass,,,i'fd Press)
EVANSTON, Ill., Oct. 8.-Follow-
ing two impressive victories over
Mt. Union and Indiana, Ohio
State's grid warriors will invade
Dyche stadium here Saturday for
their annual clash with Northwest-
ein's Wildcats. Both teams have
displayed great potential power in
their opening games and the. in-
pending contest will find them
meeting on about even terms.
The Buckeyes have been greatly
strengthened by the addition of a
number of sophomores who have
won' regular positions from letter-
men of last year. In the two games
played to date, Coach Sam Willa-
man has flashed considerable re-
serve power, a factor which imay
have a large bearing on Saturday's
game.
Nor thwestern scouts who viewed
the OhioIndiana game state that
the Buckeyes appear to be fully
50 per cent stronger than they
were a year ago. The line haa keen
strengthenedrbyBel cnegro tackle,
and Ehrensberger,. center.

At h Ie tic FraternityI

Tryouts Open at Intramural
SportsBijlding.
Tryouts for Sigma Delta Psi are
being received all this week in the
Intramural Sports building. Sigma
Delta Psi is a national honorary
athletic fraternity maintaining
chapters in thirty-nine colleges
and universities throughout the
country. Any man on the campus
may tryout. Eligibility for entering
the fraternity consists in the ac-
complishrrq nt of various athletic
feats. When the candidate has
passed these tests, he is awarded
the official key.
The events which must be achiev-
ed are: 100-yard dash-11 3-5 sec-
onds, high jump-5 feet, 16-lb. shot
put-30 feet, baseball throw, 250
feet or javelin throw, 130 feet, pole
vault-8 feet 6 inches, posture test,
220-yard low hurdles-31 seconds,
broad jump-17 feet, football kick
-120 feet, one-mile run-6 minutes,
front handspring, handstand for
10 seconds, fence vault chin high,
100-yard swim-1:45. A varsity let-
(Continued on Page 7)

Associated Press Photo
Gabby Street
MITCHELL STATE"S
NEW URLPLN
Building Will be Open Sundays
and Holidays for Informal
Athletic Activity.
Following out a new policy for
this year, the Intramural Depart-
ment has secured permission from
the Board in Control of Athletics
to open the building on Sundays
and holidays continuing through
the summer session.
The Intramural Building will be
open from eight in the morning to
six at night for all those who want
to get equipment for informal play
on the tennis, handball, and squash
courts, or the pool. The latter will
be open for use from ten to twelve-
thirty in the forenoon and from
three to five-thirty in the after-
noon. Director Mitchell wishes to
stress the point that this extend-
ed time will not be used for any
organized sports.
Due to an unusual demand for
lockers this year the third floor
lockers will have to be put into
use this year. With the building
open on Sundays and holidays now
this rush for lockers is expected to
increase.

5

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5.50 lo $7.00
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These shoes are the be't made fer al outdoor activities and afford youthe
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CUSTOM

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Fine neckwear in a pleas-
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colors and small figures.
$1.50 up
SHIRTS
The new shirts in both
plain and dicky fronts
are smart in colors.
$1.95 & $2.50
HOSE
The fashion note of im-
portance in hose is
clocks. Silk, wool, silk
and wool.
$1.00 & $1.50
BRACES
Soft colors and attractive
p a t t e r n s predominate.
Leather tabs add com-
fort.
$1.50

PERFECTION
When selecting your new suit
may we suggest that you come
in and let us show you the
newer fabrics and colors. Mist
blue, dark browns and greys
are very popular. Far superior
tailoring is characteristic of
garments by Marquardt.
$6
Upwards

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