100%

Scanned image of the page. Keyboard directions: use + to zoom in, - to zoom out, arrow keys to pan inside the viewer.

Page Options

Download this Issue

Share

Something wrong?

Something wrong with this page? Report problem.

Rights / Permissions

This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

October 07, 1930 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PACE SIX

. THE MICIGAN

DlAILY

TUESDA"Y", OCTOBER 7, 1930

PAGE SIX TUESDAY, OCTOBER 7, 1930



VARSITY

PRACTICES

NEW

ALA Y

FORMATIONS

[EN STRONGR
THA9N LAST YEAR
Leo Draveling's Entrance Into
Game Will Strengthen Line
After Loss of Hewitt.
WILLIAMSON PLAYS END
Several new plays were given to
the Wolverine Varsity yesterday as
it went through a light drill before
getting down to the serious task
of preparing for the Purdue Boiler-
makers next Saturday. The regulars
were taken to a separate part of
the field by Coach Harry Kipke
to practice the plays, while the
second string team was put through
a stiff scrimmage with Coach Ray
Fisher's freshman eleven.
Although Michigan was dealt a
hard blow when Bill Hewitt, flashy
left end, broke his ankle in last
Saturday's scoreless tie with Mich-
igan State, i t s
t chances f or a
strengthening of
one of the tackle
ositions a r e
.bright with Leo;
Draveling almost
s< 'issured of break-
ing into the Fur-
iue game, prob-
::> i b 1 y at T om
3amuel's place at
right tackle. Al-
though Samuels
aas played a nice
game in his two
JIUDSON appearances thus
far, it is likely that Draveling will
get the call because of his added
weight and experience. Both menI
are likely to see plenty of service,
however. '
Morrison Injuredf
The only other injury received
in the Spartan game was by "Doc"
Morrison, Michigan center, whot
bruised his shoulaer slightly. The
hurt is not serious, though, and it
is expected that it will have re-
covered completely by the end of
the week.I
With Bill Hewitt on the bench,
Williamson is certain to go to his
place at the left flank. Rushed into1
the State game suddenly when the
veteran wingman was carried offY
the field, Williamson played a
steady game on both offense and
defense, and should get better be-
fore the season grows much older,.
Better Than Last Year
Despite the fact that Michigan1
.was held to a scoreless tie by theE
Spartans, it is the general belief
that the team at present is better1
than it was last year at a cor-
responding time. Considerable abil-
ity to gain ground was shown Sat--
urday, and a few new scoring plays
are expected to unearth a goal line
punch that was sadly lacking in
the last game. Michigan's defense
has proved itself to be exception-
ally, strong, no other team having I
threatened the Wolverine goal line
yet this season. Also the Varsity
this week will be pointing for the
Purdue game, while in the past two
weeks the games have been of no-
importance in the standings.

AUSTIN IS VICTOR
IN FIRST TRIALS
Cross Country Runners Prepare
for Ypsilanti Meet.
Time trials were held last Satur-
day morning for the cross country;
candidates. The trials were run
over a two-mile portion of the old
course. The veteran Austin came in
with the best time of 10:43. Right
behind him was Howell, sophomore
runner, who showed fine form and
clocked at 10:44 just a shade be-
hind the leader. This new man
promises to be a strong point in
the Michigan Harriers this season.
The other two veterans placed
third and fifth, Wolfe turning in I
a 10:55 to follow Howell and Cap- I
tain Fitzgibbons ticking off 11:15
for fifth place. Another new man,
Ostrander, wedged himself in be-
tween them by running the trial in
11:06, and Crawford, who was out
last year but did not make the I
squad made the sixth best time of
11:26. The other candidates trailed!
these men with times stretching
well past thirteen minutes.
Another trial, over a three-mile
course this time, will be run off
next Saturday morning. In the
meantime, the men are busy getting
themselves into general shape for
their season which opens October
23 with Ypsilanti here. The races
this year will be run over a new
course running through the new
University golf course over gravel
roads. This change will eliminate
the macadm road to Saline with all
its traffic and give the teams a
better chance for good time.
YEARLINGS SHOW
FORM IN DRILLS
After a week of mauling and
mangling at the mercies of the
Varsity, the frosh pigskin enthus-.
iasts are beginning to show signs;
of rounding into a real gridiron;
combination.
Coach Ray Fisher, who has been
teaching the newcomers the tech-~
nique of college football, is quitea
optimistic regarding the prospects
for some good material out of the
100 men who have turned out. The
line which has been bucking the
Varsity forward wall lately has an
average weight of over 180 pounds.
Austin and Cantril have been show-
ing some real form in the scrim-
mages from their tackle posts.
Conover has also shown form as
a guard. Emling has been doing
most of the work in the center posi-
tion thus far and plays a fair game.
In the backfield, Renner, Ever-
hardus, and Ratterman h a v e
showed up well in the scrimmages
and should develop into some real
ball-toters. Ratterman will be out
of the game a few days with a
minor injury.
VARSITY WRESTLING
All men interested in trying
out for Varsity competition in
wrestling must attend the meet-
ing to be held at the Michgian
Union tonight at 7:30 under the
supervision of Coach Cliff Keen.
The nature of the meeting is
such that no candidate for the
Varsity squad can afford to be
ibsent.

CARDINAL STAR HITS DOUBLE IN SECOND TILT

JAYVEES REVEAL.
FORM IN OPENER
Tilt With Central State Shows
B Team to Have Power.
Results of the Junior Varsity
game against Central State while
not helping the year's average a
great deal are heartening to the
extent that Coach Courtright be-
lieves that he has one of the scrap-
piest squads that ever carried the
"B" Team colors. Last Saturday
without any previous scrimmage
and with only a weeks practice the
Beevees took the offensive and
played the entire game in the sea-
soned Central's territory.
Backfield and line are this week
going through an entire revamping
and with the extra drills a well
rounded team should appear next
Saturday. Kutshe, Bremen, O'Neil,
Lindsy, Coombe and Podeluski are
the outstanding backs while Jbr-
dan, Parker, Benz, Bovard, Horwitz,
O'Neil and Frisk are the neucleus
of a strong line.
Second on the schedule and one
of the toughest teams that the
Bee's will face this season is the
Indiana squad that plays here next
Saturday morning. Having lost
only a few men and with the addi-
tion of several last year's Freshmen
practically the same Hoosier team
will be on the field that went
through the season last year with-
out a defeat. Indication that they
have lost none of their old zip is
found in the fact that they gave
the Ohio Staters an 18 to 0 beating
last Saturday. With this prospect
in view Courtright is doling out
heavy work this week and expects
to have a winning team on the
field.

BUC EYES' VICTORY
Ohio State Chalks up Initial
Wio as Other Teams Play
Practice Games.
WILDCATS BEAT TULANE
After holding the Buckeyes to af
three point lead for two periods in
the Western Conference opener
Saturday, the Indiana gridders fin-
ally weakened before an impressive
onsla.ught of Ohio State substitutes
in the second half and succumbed
to a 23-0 beating. No other Big
Ten game was scheduled until next
Saturday, all of the other schools
engaging in pre-season practice
tilts.
Punishment was dealt out by
both teams during the first two
quarters, Ohio succeeding in scor-
ing but once, a field goal by Eh-
rensberger for three points. With
his men battered by severe attacks
on the part of the Hoosiers, Coach
Willaman called upon a group of
substitutes in the last half that
turned the trick and scored three
touchdowns in the last ten minutes
of play.
Of the other games featuring
Big Ten teams all eyes were turned
toward the invasionofNorthwest-
ern by the much touted big green
wave of Tulane. Although the
southern invaders showed strength,,
they failed to stop the brilliant
thrusts of Captain Hank Bruder of
the Wildcats, and the hard luck
backfield ace led his team to a 14-0
victory.
Purdue, t h e 1929 Conference
champions, who are out to repeat
(Continued on Page 7)

ATHLETICS WIN FIFTH GAME WHEN
FOXX CLOUTS HOME RUN IN NINT H

First Inning.
PHILADELPHIA -Bishop struck
out with his bat on his shoulder.
[Gelbert threw out Dykes. Cochrane'
singled to center. Simmons flied to
Gelbert. No run, one hit, no error.
ST. LOUIS - Douthit bunted to
Foxx and was out, Foxx unassisted.
Adams singled to center on the first
ball. Frisch flied to Boley. Bottom-
ley was out, Foxx unassisted. No
run, one hit, no error.
Second Inning.
PHILADELPHIA - Foxx flied to
Hafey. Miller flied to Douthit. Haas
also flied to Douthit. No run, no hit,
no error.
ST. LOUIS-Hafey flied to Sim-
mons. Walkins struck out, swinging.
Wilson lined to Simmons in deep
left on the first ball pitched. The
Cards were hitting at the first ball
pitched almost without exception.
No run, no hit, no error.
Third Inning.
PHILADELPHIA - Boley struck
out, swinging. Frisch threw out
Earnshaw. Bishop struck out again
with his bat on his shoulder. No
run, no hit, no error.
ST. LOUIS - Gelbert walked onI
four pitched balls. Grimes bunted a
sacrifice and was thrown out by
Earnshaw. Douthitt hit to Dykes,
who tried to tag Gelbert on the line,
but Gelbert scrambled back to sec-
oni and Douthit was safe at first.
-a -

Adams popped to Boley. Frisch
bounded to Foxx. No run, no hit, no
error.'
Fourth. Inning.f
PHILADELPHIA-Dykes bounced
to Gelbert. Cochrane struck out
with his bat on his shoulder. With.
the count three and one on Sim-
mons he bounced to Gelbert. No
run, no hit, no error.
ST LOUIS-Bottomley struck out.
Cochrane missed the third strike
and threw him out. Hafey walked,
Watkins flied to Haas. Wilson bunt-
ed and Earnshaw tossed him out.
No run, no hit, no error.
Fifth Inning.
PHILADELPHIA-Foxx singled to
center on the first ball pitched.
Miller hit to Gelbert and Foxx was
forced at second. Haas hit to Adams
and a double play followed, Adams
to Frisch to Bottomley. No run, no
hit, no error.
ST. LOUIS-Gelbert flied to Foxx.
Grimes was given a rousing ovation
as he came to bat. He bounced to
Earnshaw. Douthit grounded to
Boley. No run, no hit, no error.
Sixth Inning.
PHILADELPHIA-Boley grounded
to Gelbert. Earnshaw struck out,
swinging wildly at a curve ball.
Frisch threw out Bishop. No run,
no hit, no error.
ST. LOUIS - Adams struck out,
(Continued on Page 7)

Frankie Frisch, s t a r keystone
sacker of the St. Louis Cardinals, is
pictured leaning against one of
George Earnshaw's fast slants in
the first inning of the second game
of the world series. The hit went
for a double, but the Fordham Flash
was left on the paths by his team-
mates.
All freshman golfers who did
n o t play in the qualifying
matches of the University Golf
Championship should report to
Coach Trueblood and arranger
for a freshman tournament. I

!r I "rr'r, IfI B ~~

6

A.T. Cooch
&So
Good Reliable
GOOD SHOE
REPAIRING
Fast Service
Telephone 6565
1109 South University

111

i
i
i
I;
{' J

FOR YOUR NEX'T PARTY
ORCHESTRAS

11

I

-11

I - - 1

-11

:1;

- .

Ill

i l

1111

213 East Liberty
THE STORE FOR MEN
Specializing in College
Clothes
22 YEARS -EXPERIENCE
New
Fall Suits
In Twenty-Four Shades
In powder blue-of fine wor-
steds, and sparkling pin
heads-developed by Penn
Hall in the latest Michigan
model are going big.
Shop at Del Prete's before
you buy-expert fitting by
Del Prete makes you glad to
buy here.
Two Trouser Suits
$35
Others $40-$45

The Down Town Store for Mchigac -iMen '
- I
-I
VThe =
CHALLENGER
*-
Suits and Topcoats
Our fall Suits and Topcoats display the finest selec-
tion of woolens we have ever stocked. A variety of
shades of brown, grey, and blue that are exquisitely
_ designed and tailored. The fact that by manufac.
turing our own clothing and selling direct to our
customers through our 32 stores enables us to offer
this fine line of Suits and Topcoats at this price.
I_
$30 -

Fall Top

Coats

2

Long and Silk Lined
- $30 - $

X35

Gordon Slicker lined Coats
$8.50
Gordon P. Jackets
$7.50

Back to Top

© 2020 Regents of the University of Michigan