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January 27, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-27

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PAGE TWO

TIME MTC HTC'..AN

T)ATIV

T si.E Ma C'i. a a. AMi s lAYt T VLA'1lJLx~

tly, JANUARY Z7, :1:1;5 1.

Interfraternity
CHILDREN
AT SC
Purpose Stated in Constitution
to Promote Interests of
University.
TO PUBLISH HANDBOOK 4
Representation Is on Democratic
Basis; Each House Is Given
One Vote, Two Delegates. I
By CharlJes P. Sprowl. 's&>

. . . . .......... --

Council

Ilepyesents

58

SOC1*1

eties on
SA YS PRESIDENT
ERRED IN STAND

OF ARKANSAS DROUGHT REGION GATHERnnrrrur
-fOOLS WHERECHRT GROUPS FEED THEMP I mN
EXPE isCTEDIt
New Low Levels, Bte Business
fo Coming Year Foreseen by
s. d Vladimir Timoshenko.

With the rapid growth of frater-
nities on the Michigan campus
around 1910 there became a grow-
ing need for the existence of a self-
governing body to co-ordinate these
various organizaticns.
At the advice of the ente com-
mittee, who prior t )Ihs time had
investigated fraterni' y P o u s i n g
conditions and cases arising out of
fraternity mal-adjustment; the In-
terfratcrnity Council was organized
in 1912.
Meet to Organize.
The first meeting took place on
January 12 of that year. Plans of
organization were formulated and
a committee appointed to draw up
a constitution to be presented in
printed form at the next meeting.
The purpose of the Interfraterni-
ty Council as laid down by the first
constitution was stated as, "an or-
ganization to promote interests of
the University of Michigan and of
the several fraternities represented
therein; to insure co-operation
among said fraternities; and be-
tween them and the college au-
thorities to the end that the condi-
tions of the fraternities and their
relations with the college may be
improved."
Since that time the Interfrater-.
ity Council has advanced rapidly.
At the first meeting all national
fraternities which were represented
on the campus were taken into
'membership, and subsequently all
local fraternities and all other na-
tional fraternities established since
that date have been admitted as
well. At present the roll includes
58 general fraternities.
By-Laws Democratic.
The by-laws were drawn up on a
democratic bas~is, each fraternity
having one vote. Two delegates
were allowed from each house, one
to be a junior and other to be the
fraternity presidenL This is still
in force, except that in order that
the junior delegate be eligible for
election to an Interfraternity coun-
cil office he must attend three of
the five regular meetings.
The council formulates all the
rushing rules for fraternities, all
eligibility rules as to initiation, and
controls all matters of'a general
character necessary to the organ-
izations in whose interest it was
created. All rules of the council,
if passed by the Senate committee,
are to be enforced by the council,
and all punishments placed by
them are backed by the University.
Draw Up Rushing Rules.
This year a great deal of con-
structive work has been done in
drawing up the new deferred rush-
ing rules which become effective
next fall: Six students appointed
by :mean Bursley drew uri the tenta-
tive plans and these were taken
over and modified this fall by the
council; the new rules have now
been passed in their finished form
and fraternities will adhere to them
with the beginning of the first se-
mester of 1931-32.
A handbook of fraternities is al-
so to be published next fall by the
fnterfraternity Council which will
contain the names of all fraterni-
ties, their location on the campus,
a cut of their badge, their chapter
roll, and a list of members.
Each year two delegates are sent
to the National Interfraternity
Council convention, these delegates
usually being the president and
secretary of the local council.
The present officers of the coun-
cil are James Ward, president, Jack
Dobbin, secretary, James Houstou,
treasurer, and William Wessels and
Dean Esling, representatives.

Children are being fed in schools in the drought area near Englaj
unable to feed them. Here is a portion of a soup line in one of the sch

IPKter business conditions and a
I rc-adjustment in prices that will
reach a lower level in 1931 were
preuictsd yesterday by Vladimir P.
hT irshenko, lecturer in economics.
The present depression period is
cyclic and will be followed by pros-
perity this year, he assured.
"We may expect a very satisfac-
tory and continuing revival within
the ensuing year," Timoshenko said,
"since production during the last
six months has been going on at
a very low level. In fact, present
production figures indicate that we
are far below the normal replace-
,menu activities. This means that
A' v'ciatedPress Photo within a short time manufacturers
will have to increase their produc-
nd, Ark., because their families are tion to satisfy these normal re-
o61s. placement demands in adition to
the every day needs and require-
ments.
"If we consider previous trends,"
I he said, "of the business cycle, we.
find a period of falling prices from
1873 to 1896. On the other hand,
when we consider the era from 1896
to 1920-an epoch of rise in price-
stressed, and whch received favor- we find that prosperity had the
upper hand over deflation. We are.
able attention, was a more exten- now in the time of falling prices
sive use of X-rays in tubercular I after war inflation and can expect
clinical examinations, longer depression periods than
prosperity.
"The prosperous bound after the
. Omens M 2┬░is ( war was due mainly to natural re-
in Accident Sunday construction -- especially in the
buildiirqandautomobile industries
Struck as itwash en b kd and in public utilities."

Associated Press Photo

ANN ARBOR ARTIST
TO EXHIBIT WORKS
Showing by Mrs. James Stanley
Will Commence Tomorrow
in Alumni Hall.
An exhibit of water colors and
i pencil drawings by Mrs. James C.
I Stanley, of Detroit and Ann Arbor,
will be placed on display Wednes-
day in the west gallery of Alumni
Memorial hall, Mrs. John Waite,
president of the Ann Arbor Art
association, the sponsoring organ-
ization, announced yesterday.
Mrs. Stanley has recently re-
turned from the Taos, New Mexico,
art gallery. where she has studied l
for the last several years. Many of
the works which she did out there
will be included in the showing.
The exhibition will be the third
C of the year for the organization, the
second one having closed Sunday.'
The gallery will be open daily until'
5 o'clock.
What's Going On b
THEATRES
Majestic-Marion D]:vies in "The1
Bachelor Father" with C. AubreyI
Smith and Ralph Forbes.
M i c h i g a n-Joan Crawford in1
"Paid" with Ralph Armstrong.
Wuerth-"Billy t h e Kid vith
Wallace Beery and Jonnie M&ck
Brown.I
GENERAL
C o i c e r t-Albert Spalding on
Choral Union series, 8:15 o'clock,7
Hill auditorium. 1
Hlckey--M i c h i g a n State vs.'
Michigan at Coliseum.
Mus Instructor Will
Publish Book of Poems
Hunter Johnson, instructor in
musical theory at the School of
Music, has recently had accepted
for publication a book of poetry en-
titled "The Ministrel and the Vine."
In will appear in the spring, and
will include, in addition to the title
poem, several shorter ones. The
book will be published by Henry
Harrison, New York publisher, whol
is also a poet and critic of consid-
erable reputation.
- - -- -

ANN ARBOR P
BOARD CONSIDERS
CHARGE OF GUILT
County Commission Has Secret
Session With Ex-Manager.
The investigating committee of
the Washtenaw county board of
supervisors, following a conference
yesterday with A. R. Bailey, de-I
posed engineer-manager of the
board of road commissioners, will
hold a similar meeting today or to-
morrow with the commissioners to
learn at first hand the charges of

James M. Beck,
Republican representative from
Pennsylvania, who recently stated
that President Hoover had "imper-
iled the chances of his re-election" for
by his recommendation on the Quality
Wickersham prohibition report. Service
POITERS, France --(/P- A cave .a .
dwelling near Charroux, estimated Shoe Repairing
to date back 100,000 years before
Christ, is yielding flint instruments, 1109 South University
and teeth of animals of that time.--
- -11::: -li- -p

away from the curb on Huron
street at Fourth avenue Sundayl
morning, a car driven by Howard
Stuart, of Mount Clemens, suffered
a damaged fender when it wasi
struck by another car driven by!
Sylvester Eldridge, who gave his
address as the Whitney hotel.

RADIO TODAY
"The Significance of the Wash-
ington Bi-Centennial" is t h e
title of the talk to be given by
Randolph G. Adams, custodian
of the William Clements library
this afternoon at 2:00 o'clock
frcm the U n i v e r s i t y studio,
broadcalsting over WJR.
The music for the program will
be furnished by Raymond Morin,
rs tallpianist.

_i

ILLY THE KID,

Bailey that the commission is guil-
ty of irregularities.
Conforming to the plans of pro-
cedure, outlined last week at a spe-
cial meeting of the 10 supervisors c
who signed the petition calling for1
an investigation, details of yester-
day's conference were kept secret.
The meeting with the road com-
missioners, the investigating com-
mittee intimated, will be to obtain
"voluntary" information. Then, at
the investigation Feb. 2, the charges
made by Bailey and the informa-
tion secured by the committee will
be made public.
Medical Group Votes
Changes in Program
With a view to a possible re- f
orr '-ation of the program of the
Michi - Tuberculosis association,
the m .xal advisory committee, at
a meeting held yesterday in Uni-
versity hosp tal, went on record as
favoring chat-'ns. One of the points
BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street)
TODAY, 5:30 to 7:30
VEAL ROAST, DRESSING
SWISS ST EAK, JELLY
ROAST LOIN OF PORK,
APPLI. SAUCE
SAUERKRAUT WliTH PORK
MASHED OR SCALLOPED
POTATOES
WILTED LETTUCE, PEAS,
TOMATOES
35c

NOW
SHOWING
GEORGE
SIDNEY
CHARLIE
MURRAY
AGO TO
BLAZES"

Eldridge, who reported the acci-
dent to local police, said that his!
car had a smashed fender and a!
broken tail light.
-- --'

___----._____ ._._ _ _n__. __
-- .

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LAST TIMES TODAY
Saperb Comedy Fun Show
Marion Davies "BACHELOR FATHER
STARTING WEDNESDAY
MIGHTIEST SWEEP OF
SPECTACLE, DRAMA . . . HEART-
THROB EVER SHOWN!

Based on the famous Bayard Veiller play that holds all records of the stage
now a talking picture sensation!
SHORT SUBJECTS

I

I

WE DELIVER PHONE 8241

I

"A TOUGH WINTER"
Our Gang Comedy

PARAMOUNT
NEWS

F-

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r

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} j b ,
1110
, i
A
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rl
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3

Stars of All Creation Hurled
Into Meteor of All Shows .. .
Gorgeous Voices of Daniels
and Marshall . . . "Cuckoo"
Clowns of "Rio Rita" Rolling
Bigger and Better Laughs . . .
)Masterly Drama . . . Carnival
of Unbridled Pleasures.
71W' Ix

9 9
G~il lbl c/S.af9(~C 6 t (-4 '

I

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