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January 22, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-22

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'AGE TWO

T HE MICHIGAN

DAILY

THURSDAY, JANUARY 22, 1931

TURN OUT ~PDO 110 TO ni~rii~e

I- HOP O ECHEST
PREPARE FEATU
F R 115 .II-0
Jan Garber, Herbies Kay to
at Campus Social
Event.

BANS TRNOT
AAMERICAN EDITOR IJEEK UF PIU UHUAti
RE Isw C HUHC! VI'PLN

Onderdonk to Address
International Forum

'

o Play

ExecZ1,ive Committec
With Faculty Mern

to MeetI
ibers

at L theon .
Plans for the Religious Elmphasis
week to be held Feb. 22 to MarchI
I have been orogressing nder the
various comnmittces in charge. and
members of the executive coi. nit-
tee will meet with members of thej

Prof. Francis S. Ondercionk of the
,chool of architceture will lecture
at the fifth internalanailforum of
the Student Christian association
at 3:30 o'clock Sunday in Lane hall
auditorium. He will discuss the
question "How to End War."
Postal Employees
Announce Students
Write Most Sunday

INE STMN BEONDS
C a r r i e r Descriptions Marked
by Rise; Some Highest

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PRESIDENT SIGNS
PROTEST TO! CUBA

RECENT LUP RACES
Designer of Enterprise Speaks
on Famous Competition

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BOTH, PLEASED TO PLAY
Kay Will Present Songs of Own
Composition and Two
Stdi ent T es
Musical novelties and varieties
are beig arranged by Jan Garber
and his Creater Columbia Record-
ing orchestra and Herbies Kay and
his band in preparation for their
program at the 1932 J-Hop, Feb. 13
in the Intramural building.
Since neither of the bands has
ever played at any social function
on the campus. both were particu-
larly anxious to play at the Hop,
when approached on the subject.-
(farbc rTou Cc antry. {
Garber's orchestra which has
been ranked as one of the out-
standing bands of the country,.has
played in every principal city of
the country. His long list of en-
gagements include stays at the
Little club, New York; the Gibson
Hotel, Cincinnati, where he made
numerous friends broadcasting ov
er radio Station WLW, and a seasor
at the famous Atlantic City audi-
torium. A tremendous following
and widespread popularity was also
secured in several tours through
the South, a six months' engage-
meint. on the Keith circuit, andc
many months of playing on the
West.Coast.
In addition, Garber has played at!
social functions at Cornell, Penn-
sylvania, Colgate, Princeton, Dart-
mouth, Williams, Yale, Alabama,
Georgia, and at most western insti-
tutions. During the past year, this
group of artists has been making
several talking picture productions, I
as well as playing for Columbia
record % At present, Garber is play-;
ing at the Chicago Town Tavern3
club.
Kay Plays at Trianon.
Although not as well known as
Garber, Kay within the last year
has skyrocketed to an enviable po-
sition in Chicago orchestral circles.
He is now enjoying unusual popu-
larity at the Trianon and the Ara-
gon, Chicago's two largest ball-
rooms, where he is attracting ca-
pacity eiowds. Music critics have
been unanimous in their praise of
his music.
Kay ii! play some songs of his
own coipjition at the Hop, as
well as two tunes written by stu-
dents on the campus. His banjo
interludes are expected to be an
entertaining feature of the Hop.
The orchestra leades, whoare
warm personal friends, have ap-
peared together on other occasions.
A combination of the bands, under
the direction of Garber, is con-
sidered possible for a short time
during the Hop.
GAR WOOD HOPES
TO BREAK RECORD
Predicts 150 Miles Per Hour
Mark Not Far Away.
(v A wcia dss
MIAMI BEACH, Fla., Jan. 21.-
A boat speed of 150 miles an hour
is not far away says Gar Wood of
Detroit, who is here seeking a.
world's record with his Miss Amer-
ica IX.
"It's only aquestion of power,"
he remarked as he worked along
the ways in preparation for his at-
tempt on the record March 17 and
18.

t

faculty today at luncheon to enlist,
Ithe pr.ctical symo;thy of interest- There may b no Sunday classes'
ed faculty members who are active the iJniv 'sity, ai postOffices
in their respective religious bodies. may be closed, but that means littlej
Thome of the faculty who will at- to postal employees.
tend this meeting, at which time For, they say, students writeI
they will be informed of plans for, more letters on this dy than any
the observance of the week, are: other b:lieve i1 or not.
Dean J. A. Bursley, Prof. S. F. Gin- All in all, an ave :aae of 12,000
gerich, Prof. J. L. Brumm, Prof. L. letters are collected each Sunday
" Assrcwma v aress Pho I. Shaffman, Dr. Edgar Kahn, Dr. from the various boes located
Cyrus C. Sturgis, Prof. George E. throughout the city. This estimatel
John T. Wilford,, Myers, Prof. Edgar N. Durfee, Prof. represents mail deposited almost
Editor of an American newspaper, Aloysis Gaiss, Prof. Louis A. Hop- entirely by students. The averageI
whose criticism of the government kins, Prof. Ernest M. Fisher, Mr. daily collection on week days, offi-y
of CP1ba led to his deportation by W., D. Baton, and Mr. Carleton F. cials said, the major part of which
Cuban officials. He is shown here Wells. is made up of business letters, is
after his arrival in Miami, Florida. "The plans for Religious Empha- about 27,000.
sis Week make a strong appeal to The greatest accumulaLon of!
me,"said J. B. Edmonsen, dean of mail is on Monday, mostly business
the school of education. "The fact letters, while Friday is the "heavi-
that all of the religious groups are est" day for incoming mail.
supporting the plans gives evidence Special delivery letters also come'
of a fine cooperative spirit. It is in for their share of attention. An
IAV L A E MENTmy prediction that students and average of between 500 and 600
faculty members will give the pro- special letters are received e a c h
gram a degree of support that will Sunday at the central postoffice on
Rome Dispatches State Building help to make it a real factor in the Main street, delivered in three trips
Ships to be on Parity life of the University." by five special delivery men.
With France. Prof. Ora S. Duffendack, of the But, said those who take care of.
physics department, gave further Uncle Sam's mail, the greatest
(ByAssociated Presy) evidence of faculty support to the amount of incoming mail is around
AS Ja. 21.Thes Fren-project in a letter to the executive the first of the month, adding that
ARISJans21.-TeFrench- jt atterit is probably because of "sinking
Italian naval construction truce' committee. He said, "I was veryfud.
agreed upon last year after the two glad to have the opportunity of dis-
countries had failed to adhere to cussing with you the plans for Re-
the principal sections of the Lon- ligious Emphasis week, as I find RADIO TODAY
don naval treaty, was said in au- myself very much interested in the Prof. William Clark Trow, of
thoritave circles today to have project. It gives an opportunity for the educational school, will speak
come to an end. us to clarify our minds on some this afternoon from the Univer-
omedto a e questions of human experience that sity of Michigan studio of Sta-
Rome dispatches stated th a t are excluded from our curricula. I tion WJR on the subject, "Edu-
from now on Italy was prepared, am not surprised that you are find- cation for Citizenship." The Mid-
independent of its normal con- ing widespread interest in the pro- nite Sons quartet will also be a
struction program, to build gun for ject. feature of the program.
gun with France. Work is to be "The feature of the plan that
started on the suspended 1930 pro-p-
gram of 22 submarines and seven most appeals to me is that it is a'
other units with keels to be laid in coordinated activity of all the re- Publisher Dies; Couple
a few months. ligious groups represented on the Rescued in Sand Dunes
campus and not a united activity. _
Both here and in Rome there A fine spirit of tolerance is implied
seemed to be no hope for resump- 'in that each group leaves to the Thx.soan. 21rs A
tion of pourparlers in Geneva whichrsould fndrrysngutuo of theu- LUBBOCK, Tex., Jan. 21.--A Sun~-
io ofpuprrsi Geeaothers the carrying out of the pur- day afternoon jaunt of a newspaper
which would find a solution of the pose of the Mission according to pay acros the sa newst
differences between the two coun~ t w ln ndpatcsTi party across the sand dunes west
res the n its own plans and practices. This of Lubbock to look for antelope,
the Landon naval treaty limitation plan, I believe, insures success to undertaken as a pleasure trip, had
sectionds. the project. its tragic aftermath today.
M=. and Mrs. Charles A. Guy of

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Since 192 4 in Yachting.
Building a yacht to race for the
n. 1 oted America's cup is a serious matter,
remarked W. Starling urgess, de-
v"le " " ud wsigner of the latest cup winner.
adjusted at higebr levels ioday as Enterprise, speaking here yesterday
the tone of the market continued on the recent competition and his
stronog. Trading was at a good work in boat designing. A ya cht in
pace, with a markdcl dema'nd for the class of the Enterprise requires
carrer deswption, mn ofw l .more than a yeari. o build and costs
carrier descriptions, soreof which -nary n i yaknrs e ad
nearly one million dolla rs, he said.
made large gains to reach new high Mr. Burgess is the son of Edward
prices for the past year, which Burgess, who, with Nathaniel Her-
also arc the be3t cince 12. All reshoff, built all the America's cup
winners for about half a century.
sections of the list benefited from Rigid restrictions on size and
the bhying Iierest although the strength have altered racing condi-
aver age gains were smaller thani tions, so that they are much more
those of prominent rails. Walter Williams, favorable to the challenger than in
The marked rise in the price of I President of the University of the past, Mr. Burgess said. Although
United States government obliga- I Missouri and honorary president of he had designed sloops of the M
tions in recent weeks is regarde c as 1 the Press Congress of the World, class, he was faced by a great many
a development which will force who signed a protest to Secretary new problems when he was ap-
banks and other institutions to of State Stimson and President of pointed by Harold Vanderbilt to
turn more strongly to long term in- Cuba against the suppression and design a yacht to compete in de-
vestments. censorship of Havana papers. fending the cup. While he had
many ideas for changes in te hui l
!I he decided to use the conventional
type and improve the rigging, he
said.
ANN ARBOR[ D NJEW o-BRIEFS By careful comptatios from
-d' 1 statistics on wind c'ondlitIions, he
determined upon certain features of
--_- _the boat. A tank model was used
mc testing them. Innovations in-
NEWVSCOI"OL EAD A car driven by E. A. Wenzel, 300 corporated into the design included
r Pine Ridge avenue, was slightly a duralumin mast and a sliding
WILL BEGIN WORK damaged when it collided with one j boom, which had to be kept secret
driven by Mrs. E. E. Fleischaman, from other competitors for a time.
Thursion to be Made Treasurer 39 Jewett avenue at noon yester- When the boat was completed, a
-ray. crew, almost entirely of Scandin-
o-f School -oard.- avian descent, was carefully trained
Lo M. Thurston, superintendent Tuck Driver Injured in handling it, Mr. Burgess said.
Lee . Tursonsuperin:^nentThey lived on the boat, and from
of schools at Perry, Mich., who was in Fall in Elevator the opening of the spring had a
I elected assistant superintendent of -- regular schedule of drill.
the Ann Arbor public hohols at.,. 1Edward Blankertz, of WaynejI Slides and motion pictures of the

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meeting Tuesday of the board o'
e Michigan, an employee of the East-
education will probably assume his ern Michigan trucking company,
new post within the next few weeks,'sustained two broken legs when he
Otto W. Haisley, superintendent of fell from the first floor to the base-
schools, said last night. ment in an elevator shaft in the
At, the same time, Haisley saidi K. and M. hardware store, 112 W.
that Thurston would be made treas- Liberty street, at 11 o'clock yester-
urer of the school board, filling the day morning.
office of Grove J. Ray, former treas- Blankertz, who is 39 years old,
urer, and who now is out on $5,000 was delivering freight to the hard-
bond pending trial onda charge of ware company when he stepped in-
embezzling school funds. to the elevator shaft. He was tak-
Thurston graduated from the j en to St. Joseph's Mercy hospital
i University in 1918, and served with where he was treated by Dr. C. L.
the marine corps during the World I Washburne.
war. He also holds a master's de-I -.
gree, and has also completed con- I
siderable work on his doctorate at
the University. NOW
The action taken yesterday, how- H
ever, was not; official, but Haisley
said the appointment of Thurstonl,
would be approved by the board at THE WINDY CITE
its February meeting.

Enterprise and a number of slides
illustrating the progress of boat
designing were shown and explain-
ed by Mr. Burgess.
TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of machines
Our equipment and per-
s o n n e I are considered
among the best in the State. The result
of twenty years' careful building.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615
- -i

Y'S BIG BLOWOUT

2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

The building holiday was agreed WeReports 4
upon by Aristide Briund and Pro- ssne
mier Mussolini and was to have Scarlet Fever Cases
run out last month, but until Rome!-----
dispatches informing officials of 1 A total of 14 scarlet fever cases
Italy's intentions to proceed with have been reported to the health
construction it was under-tood ! office in. the past 24 hours, Dr. John
here it might be protracted soy: e- Wessinger, health officer, reported
what longer. last night. This includes two cases
Italy's contention has been for 'eported from . outside the city
naval parity with France. France, I i, making a total of 12 cases
professedly willing to grant parity inI."Arbor.
in the Mediterranean, has claimed Sci ia will not be closed, it was
the right to build 150,000 naval said, although the epidemic has
tons to offset the projected German shown no .gans of decline.
fleet and another 130,000 tons to Dr. Wessim^r said last night thatI
keep up her communications with quarantines on several residences
the colonies. will be lifted within the next few
days. One quarantine was lifted
yesterday.

.IL,""A . . vta ta r. u y v
Lubbock, were rescued Tuesday
near their car and the body of L.
Herbert Quinn. 32. publisher of the

1161U%} 1 U 'Z~ulil, 0 , Iu ~ uG lU1
Lubbock Avalanche-Journal, was-
found by two cowboys about ten Automobile Accidents
miles away, where he had died from"
exposure and exhaustion. Guy is Reported to Official
editor of the two publications.
Guy related Tuesday night how Two minor automobile acciden
the car stalled in sand on a ranch were reported to police yesterda
in Yoakum county, about 75 miles Cars driven by Erwin Schumache
from this city. The three believed of Carlton, Mich., and Jesse Kelle
!they sc w a windmill several miles of Ypsilanti, collided at the inter
away and Quinn suggested he go section of Fifth avenue and Libert
to the mill, scale the tower and try street at four o clock in the afte
to find some habitation. noon.

ALICE
WHITE

IN

NEIL
HAMILTON
CHICAGO"

s

"THE WIDOW FROM

ts
y.
yr'
r,
qty

mesm ents insst Apply
for Automobile Tags
Thomas O'Brien, chief of police,
issued a warning to Ann Arbor
residents yesterday regarding appli-
cation for 1931 automobile license
plates. Local police will begin en-
forcing use of the new tags on Feb.
1, thus giving Ann Arbor residents
10 days in which to purchase the1
new plates.

Bread and water sentences for
drunkenness have been imposed by
Judge J. H. Warner of Brainerd,
Minn.

BRIGHT SPOT
802 Packard Street
TODAY, 5:30 to 7:30
LIVER AND BACON
SWISS STEAK, FRIED
ONIONS
ROAST PORK, APPLE SAUCE
ROAST OF BEEF, JELLY
MASHED OR FRIED
POTATOES
HEAD LETTUCE SALAD
OR
CREAMED CORN
35c

l h_.
'
<
h ^4
\ ., _

IE

WE RENr
WE SERVIC
WE SELL
CROSLEY.
Tel. 2-2812

E Radiosi
AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP
615 E. WilliamI

I

WE DELIVER

PHONE 8241

19
MSAJESTIC
Now Playing
Alice Duer Millers'
Most Amusing
Comedy

1111

Widovs made while you wait" is the new racket now. And when this
widow steps into gangland-what a riot!
COMING SUNDAY
Wallace Beery-John Mack Brown
"BILLY THE KID"
Sunday, 4:15, Jan. 25--Mendelssohn Theatre
SCHOOn0"L OF IM"USIC TR"Im.
Wassily Besekirsky-Hanns Pick-Joseph Brinkman
Violin Violoncello Piano
No Admission Charge
Tuesday, 8:15, Jan. 27-Hill Auditorium
merican Violinist
In Choral Union, Series
Tickets: $1.00, $1.50, $2,00,. $2.50

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"We'll have a new world recordI
the next time we go out after it,"
he predicted confidentially. "If we
can't get it with the engines we
already have, there are engines
available that will give it to us."
Wood's former world record was
broken last year by the late Sir
Henry 0. D. Seagrave, who regis-
ecred an.average of 98.76 miles per
.orn, in two trips across a measured
nile course in England. Seagrave
ws fatally injured in his speed

The First Lady of the Screen
In Her Greatest Role!!

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It is a story of a woman
who loved-and sinned-
whose glorious romance is
N "~ b I a st e d by the untimely
death of her fiance .
The story takes us up thru
the years until her daughter,
grown to beautiful woman-
hood - enters upon life-
afraid to love!
But love does come in a
most, startling way.
GHAUERTO N
I"heN"i"h
RUTH1

A h
' Movietor'c
flomanticcConme(:-
1i .
CHALE ยง/ 'ELL
' i? H. P.aJenyr

WATLING
LERCHEN &
H AYES
Members
New York Szock Exchange
Detroit Stock Exchange
New York Curb (Associate)
ealers in

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Monday, 8:15, Feb. 2-Hill Auditorium
Negro Baritone
In Choral Union Series
Tickets: $1.00, 1.50, $2.00, $2.50
Tuesday, 8:15, Feb. 10-Hill Auditorium
STE RG"E.R ACHMAN I NOFF

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1):;- (tfd by
p> ' -" Alxdrectodd,

Russian Pianist
In Choral Union Series

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