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October 04, 1930 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-04

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PAGE FOUR

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1930

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control of Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication o, all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
in thie paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
master General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail,
$4.50.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, May-
niard Street.
Phones:Editorial, 4925; Business, 212r4.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
R MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
City Editor
Frank E. Cooper
News Editor........Gurney Williams
Editorial Director...........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor.............Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editorr............ Mary L. Behymer
Telegraph Editor.......... Harold 0. Warren
Musicaand Drama.......William J. Gorman
Assistant News Editor...Charles R. Sprowl
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S.Forsythe Richard L. Tobin
David M. Nichol Harold O. Warren
Sports Assistants
Sheldon C. Fullerton J.sCullen Kennedy.
Robert Townsend
Reporters
Walter S. Baer, Jr. Wilbur J. Myers
Irving J. Blumberg Robert L. Pierce
Donald O. Boudeman Sler M. Quraishi
Charles M. Brown C. Richard Racine
George T. Callison Jerry E. Rosenthal
George Fisk (George Rubenstein
.ernard W. Freund David Sachs
Morton Frank Charles A. Sanford
Saul Friedberg Karl Seiffert
Frank B. Gilbreth Robert F. Shaw
Karl E. Goelner Edwin M. Smith
Jack Goldsmith George A. Stauter
Rand Goodman Alfred R. Tapert
William H. Harris John S. Townsend
James H. Inglis Robert D. Townsend
Emil J. Konopinski Max H. Weinberg
Denton C. Kunze Joseph F. Ziasb
Powers Moulton
Lynne Adams Margaret O'Brien
Betty Clark Eleanor Rairdon
Elsie Feldman Jean Rosenthal
Elizabeth Gribble Cecilia Shriver
Emily G. Grimes Frances Stewart
Elsie M. Hoffmeyer Anne Margaret Tobin
jean Levy Margaret 'Thompson
Dorothy Magee Claire Trussell
Mary McCall Barbara Wright
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214
BUSINESS MANAGER
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY
Assistant Manager
KASPER H. HALVERSON
Department Managers
Advertising...............Charles T. Kline
Advertising............. Thomas M. Davis
Advertising............William W. Warboys
Service..................Norris J. Johnson
Publication ......... ,.. Robert W. Williamson
Circulation ............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts ....... .........Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary . . Mary J. Kenan

Thomas E. Hastings
Harry R. Begley
William Brown
Richard H. Hiller
Vernon Bishop
William W. Davis
. Fred Schaefer
Joseph Gardner
Ann Verner
Dorthen Waterman
Alice McCully,
Dorothy Bloomgarde
Dorothy Laylin
J osephine Convisser
ernice Glaser
Ilortense Gooding

Byron V. Vedder
Erle Kightlinger
Richard Stratemeier
Abe Kirshenbaum
Noel D. Turner
Aubrey L. Swinton
Wesley C. Geisler
Alfred S. Remsen
Laura Codling
Ethel Constas
Anna Goldberg
n Virginia McComb
Joan Wiese
Mary Watts
Marian Atran
Sylvia Miller

Yet if Governor Roosevelt is will-
ing to dissociate himself from
pure party supports and rely upon
the confidence of the people of
New York he will have gone far
toward satisfying the voters as to
is own honest intentions. The cir-
cumstances surrouding T a in-
many's corruptibility makes such a
stand imperative; in the event of
Governor Roosevelt's failure to hit
the issue squarely, the governor-
ship which was a few weeks ago
safe within his hands may have
slipped or been lost completely.
A BID FOR LEADERSHIP.
No one on Michigan's campus
who is alive to student well-being
can ignore the impending actions
of the dean's office and the Inter-
fraternity council with regard to
deferred rushing. Yet this measure
is only a barometer indicating
a progressively mobile attitude
toward fraternities in other aspects
than their rushing.
It is quite pertinent, therefore,
and even tremendously important
that those representatives selected
for the Interfraternity council by
intelligence, leadership and alert-
ness to the issues at point with
regard to club affairs. Never before
in the life of fraternities on Mich-
igan's campus has so definite an
offensive thrust been made toward
them. The Council this year is
a position by way of being momen-
tous for two reasons: the serious
nature of the particular matters
with which it must be concerned
demands an energetic vigilance
and earnest consideration; the
willingness of the dean's office to
await the council's proposals for
the enforcement of deferred rush-
ing is motivated by a hope that
that body will supply an efficient
and trustworthy plan for fraternity
co-operation in rushing under new
rules. The future of student leader-
ship and voice in the management
of campus as well as their so-called
private affairs depends largely upon
the quality and nature of the work
which the Interfraternity council
undertakes this year.
It is quite clearly apparent, then,
that the former practice of send-
ing to the Interfraternity council
those members who had nothing
better to do, or who could do their
house no wrong, or who were the
only gullible ones available must
be abandoned. If the houses this
year fail to elicit the greatest forces
of leadership and intelligent inter-
est in undergraduate affairs for
the new council, we predict that
a sorry step will soon be taken
toward a re-focussing of student
matters in the eyes of the admin-
istration.
RELEGATED TO THE BACK-
GROUND.
(From Yale Daily News).
Soon Yale will induct into serv-
ice a new University pastor, and
he will find himself confronted
with the problem of religious apa-
thy on our campus. By this we do
not mean that Yale stands unique
as the home of the atheist and
agnostic, but simply that there are
comparatively few of her students
who look upon religious worship
and belief as a vital force in their
lives.
Aside from the psychological or
theological aspects of the modern
religious situation, we have con-
stantly felt that a very real cause
of the apathy aforementioned is
ignorance. Religious education is
not zealously sponsored by the

churches outside the Roman Cath-
olic Church, whatever it might be
in that institution; it is left to the
family, who leave it to the schools
and colleges, who neglect it.
At Yale we have courses, well
taught and comprehensive, which
deal with the Christian religion.
But this is not sufficient. The asso-
ciation of intellectual brilliance
with religious indifference has come
about because of an attitude such
as is adopted by the average
instructor in the schools and col-
leges. This individual, imbued with
the doctrine that nothing should
be believed before investigation,
and teaching the same lesson to
his classes, has found religion in-
accessible. Too much of the emo-
tional side is demanded of him,
and he cannot give it without first
finding intellectual support. So in
all his lectures he passes slighting-
ly over the one field which has
resisted his scientific attempts at
analysis, and religion drops into
obscurity in all courses but those
few especially detailed to cover it.
Undergraduates will not yield to
religious faith, until they have
learned something of the facts.
They will not elect studies that

Well, fellows, today we go to seef
the hope and pride of Mich. StateI
preform. My one ardent wish is
that I don't have to sit behind that
old lady who didn't like my re-
marks about the Ypsi players.
What's more, I don't want anyone1
breathing wood alcohol f u m e s1
down my neck.-the skin isn't alll
back on it yet from last week.
* * *
Just as an added incentive
to go and see the Ann Arbor
police force do tricks with their
hired squad of drunks and
pickpockets which they so suc-
cessfully capture each week,
the weather man tells us that
the usual rain will be in evi-
I don't like football anyway,
dence at the festivities. Oh well,
and the M. S. C. ticket didn't
cost me anything.
* *- *
Signs of the season are plenti-
fully scattered around us. Only
yesterday the Rolls Pherret saw
two lovely young ladies walking
down Church Street with a football
in each hand.
Probably out to make the
team.
* * *
The Rolls Society for Moral and
Aesthetic Uplift has handed in a
resolution to the effect that, due
to the demoralizing effect of such
a spectacle, upon the loyalty and
pride of the student body, whoever
is responsible for the turning of
the side yard of the Architectural
Building into a public dump should
be ostracized.
* ' * *
A recent headline states:-
Sturgis to Describe
Treating of Anaemia
in Eastern Lecture.
Good stuff! Maybe we can get
him out here to treat some of our
lectures too. It's things like this
that restore my faith in science.
* * *
There may yet be hope for
the taxi situation here. The
other day the Pherret saw a
taxi in the Ann Arbor junk-
yard. Of course there is always
the possibility that it was one
that had just arrived from out
of town, and has not yet been
added to the fleet. Anyway, it
holds forth a cheering promise
of change.
* * *
Our old pal Washtenaw T-une
came out yesterday with a lovely
banner declaiming "M. S. C, NEXT
ON MICHGAN SCHEDULE TO-
MORROW" The idea they want to
get across being, no doubt, that
Michigan isn't going to play any-
one else before M. S. C.-at least
not tomorrow.
A whisper is going the rounds
of the campus to the effect that
Joe Parker's is going to revive
the old time tradition about
freshmen frequenting s u c h
places of ill-oh never mind,
just places. As an enforcement
measure in support of this plan,
they are going to serve such of
the little dears as persist in
coming with nothing but the
purest and best of Ann Arbor
milk.-At that the boys are
getting off easy. They might
serve them Ann Arbor water.
* *.*
I seem to be flooded with head-
lines today. Another that caught
.theeagle eye of one of the boys
says:-

tiROLL

MUSIC AND DRMA
TONIGHT: In the Mendelssohn
Theatre beginning promptly at
8:30 a dance recital by Carola
Goya, celebrated Spanish artist.
MOLNAR APPEARS AGAIN IN
NEW YORK.
Henry Miller, a producer not
particularly famous for integrity,
tried to slip a program of two
Molnar pot-boilers into the very
difficult theatrical season last Mon-
day night. The Violet with Ruth
Gordon and One, Two, Three with
Arthur Byron was the program. I
am happy to record that the New
York critics soundly trounced Mr.
Miller for his attempt, calling par-
ticular attention to the miserable
over-writing in both plays, which
contained hardly enough material
for good one-acts, to the obvious
shoddiness of the direction, the
inadequacy of everyone in the
minor cast, and the consequent
terrible burden placed on Miss
Gordon and Mr. Byron, two of the
most . competent and interesting
actors on the American stage.
The Violet is a vaudeville skit
about the deplorable tendency of
feminine theatrical applicants to
offer their bodies to managers
(illustrated soundly by four girls
acting in good burlesque tradition)
and the eventual success of one
girl who exploits an extremely
subtle naivete (played by Ruth
Gordon so charmingly and with
so many intriguing, indefinable
aspects of technique as to almost
make the piece worthwhile).
"One, Two, Three" satirises in
an obvious, unsubtle way the effi-
ciency of the contemporary busi-
ness *man. Nordsen, a modern
Napoleon, is suddenly presented
presented with a situation in which
he must change a burly taxi-driver
with boots and a mackinaw into a
sophisticated member of the aris-
ticracy- an admirable theme for
a musical comedy sketch. A whole
banking organization is called into
play. There are, of course, amusing
moments but the affair becomes
very tedious in twenty minutes and
it lasts an unintermissioned ninety.
Arthur Byron, the late warden of
The Criminal Code, gives an amaz-
ing display of virtuosity, excel-
lently varying his tempo, manner
of delivery, and style of motion.
The incident is merely another
illustration of the American pro-
ducer's deplorable habit of forcing
us to see our best actors in bad
pot-boilers. Yet it has a possible
local relevance. Here and else-
where, there seems to be a general
opinion that Molnar is marvel-
ously "playable." A better opinion,
I think, would have it that Molnar
(with the exception of Liliom, per-
haps The Play's The Thing, and
one or two others) is seldom worth
playing at all and then iplayable
only by virtuosi, who can add tech-
nical interest to compensate for
the inevitable thinness. There is
no Ruth Gordon or Arthur Byron
among amateurs. Molnar's is per-
haps the most over-rated reput-
tion in America. The fact of hav-
ing sat through One, Two, Three
and The Violet makes this judge-
ment almost a grudge. Yet there
has been local evidence too. And
then last year in New York, Mima,
the magnificent flop.

CUSTOM-MADE CLOTHES
$35 to $40
Collegiate Styles
CHARLES DOUKAS
1319 South University

_

-~________ z
k

i

H. W. CLARK
SHOE MANUFACTURER
LADIES' & MEN'S
Half Sole and Rubber Heels
per 98c pair
All Work Guaranteed
Factory: 534 Forest Ave.
2nd Branch: 1113 South U. Ave.
3rd Branch: 210 E. Washington

University Music House
Devoted to Music
William Wade Hinshaw
Cor. Maynard & William Phone 7515

I

BROWN-CRESS
& Company, Inc.
INVESTMENT
SECURITIES
Orders executed on all ex-
changes. Accounts carried
on conservative margin.
Telephone 23271
ANN ARBOR TRUST BLDG.
1st Floor

German American
& R S Restaurant
512 East William Street
PROPRIETOR, GOTTLIEB GERRBACH
Good Home Cooking
EVERY SATURDAY
Pig Hocks and Spare Ribs, Sauerkraut and Spatzen.........
EVERY SUNDAY
Chicken Dinner with Dressing....................... .
SUPPERS
Wiener Stelitzel------------------------------------
All kinds of steaks ..... ... ... .... ..........- .50 and
Chops................................................
French or American Fried Potatoes
The Cheapest Price in the City
Come and Bring Your Family
THANK YOU

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:..I

11

SATURDAY, OCTOBER 4, 1930
Night Editor--DAVID M. NICHOL
NEW YORK'S GOVERNORSHIP.
Two circumstances, both highly
trenchant, have somewhat ruffled
Governor Roosevelt's once smooth
course to re-election in New York
state's November vote. One marked
change in the political outlook is
the bringing over of the Repub-
ican party to a statement in
favor of repealing the Eighteenth
Amendment. The second is the
renewed charge of corruption in
Tammany affairs. Six weeks ago,
Governor Roosevelt's renomination
and re-election would have been
conceded by all save the staunch-
est Republican leaders; now there
are earmarks of an embrogio in-
volving even Catalinian tendencies.
The Republican stand on Prohi-
bition was obviously intended to
equalize the two parties on that
issue. And while the Wet question,
judged from the standpoint of
party strategy, has probably been
removed from the contest, the sops
thrown to the Dry Republicans at
the same time the stand for repeal
of the Eighteenth Amendment was
taken and the more virile and ex-
plicit statement of the Democrats
in favor of repeal seem capable of
annoying the Republican forces.
The Tammany corruption charge
undoubtedly accounts for the nom-
ination by the Republicans of
Charles H. Tuttle, who stated in
accepting the race for office that
there would be only one issue in
the coming campaign, namely, that
created by recent disclosures con-
cerning the judiciary in New York
city and the refusal of John F.
Curry, leader of Tammany Hall,
and several district leaders to
waive immunity and give testimony
before the grand jury.
The reaction of the Democrats
to graft in high places was in the
usual amusing party form. Former
Governor Alfred E. Smith, in nom-
inating Governor Roosevelt, loudly

FIRST METHODIST
CHURCH
Cor. S. State and E. Washington Sts.
Dr. Frederick B. Fisher, Minister
10:30 A. M.-Morning Worship.
"PRAYING WITH MY MIND,"
by Dr. Frederick B. Fisher.
12:00 M.-Sunday School Class at
Wesley Hall. Subject: "Compara-
tive Religions." Leader: Mrs.
Frederick B. Fisher.
6:00 P. M.-Devotional Meeting at
Wesley Hall. Leader: Mr. Ralph
Johnson, Student Director. Sub-
ject: "The Heel of Achilles."
7:30 P. M.-Evening Worship.
"MODERN YOUTH FOR
WORLD PEACE," by Dr. Fisher.
FIRST BAPTIST CHURCH
E. Huron, below State
R. Edward Sayles, Minister
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students.
9:45 A. M.-Church School. Mr.
Wallace Watt, Superintendent.
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Sermon by Mr. Sayles, "THE
BREAD OF LIFE."
12:00 Noon-University Students at
Guild House (503 E. Huron). Mr.
Chapman, in charge.
5:30 P. M.-Student Friendship
Hour at Guild House.
6:30 P. M.-Devotional Hour. Rev.
Howard R. Chapman, Minister of
Students will speak.
BETHLEHEM
EVANGELICAL CHURCH
(Evangelical Synod of N. A.)
Fourth Ave. between Packard and
'William
Rev. Theodore R. Schmale
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.

ANN ARBOR CHURCHES
EXTEND A WELCOM TO
THE STUDENTS OF THE
UNIVERSITY ON THEIR
RETURN TO THE CITY.

Complete Line of Everything Musical

THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE OF PIANOS
VICTOR MAJESTIC BRUNSWICK RADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit

FIRST
PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH
Huron and Division Sts.
Merle H. Anderson, Minister
Alfred Lee Klaer, University Pastor
Mrs. Nellie B. Cadwell, Counsellor of
Women.
9:30 A. M.-Church School, Rally
Day in all classes.
10:45 A. M.-Morning;Worship,
Holy Communion and Reception
of New Members. Sermon: "Re-
membrance by Doing" Rev. M. H.
Anderson.
12:00 Noon-Student Classes.
5:30 P. M.-Social Hour for Young
People.
6:30 P. M.-Young People's Meet-
ing. Leader: Rev. Alfred Lee
Klaer. Topic: "Objectives."

!'-

17--

ATTEND
CHURCH
REGULARLY

The
gested
ternity
almost
merely

Two Thousand Sev-
enty-six sleep in
Tramp Room.
Pherret straightway sug-
that that could be a fra-
early morning news bulletin
any day in the week by
changing it to read:-
Two Thousand Sev-
enty-six Tramp in
Sleep Room.

DETROIT THEATRES.
After an absolutely dark summer,
Detroit theatres are opening with
shows of quite promising calibre.
The Theatre Guild has opened its
Detroit subscription season with
Shaw's "The Applecart." New York
critics hailed the play as Shaw's
most loquacious and most un-
dramatic: which has been his trend
for some years. The interest now
seems directed more toward the
production which contains, among
other things, some dazzling virtu-
osity from Tom Powers in whose
part lies "the longest speech in the
history of drama." The Guild's vow
to produce all of Shaw one has
long thought an unfortunate de-
cision; yet its persistence in that
tradition has given its Shavian
productions a technical interest
that attracts patronage even when
the play is thought to be weak.
Next week Arthur Hammerstein's
musical romance of the 90's "Sweet
Adeline" will replace "The Apple-
Cart" at the Wilson. This show
with music by Jerome Kern and
book by Oscar Hammerstein, and
Helen Morgan, Irene Franklin and
Charles Butterworth as the prin-
cipals, was the most successful
musical comedy in New York last
season.

i m

FIRST CONGREGATIONAL
CHURCH
Allison Ray Heaps, Minister
Sunday, October 5, 1930
10:45 A. M.-Morning Worship.
Mr. Heaps will preach the first
of a series of sermons on "Reli-
gion to Live By," the subject be-
ing "How Shall We Think of
God?"
5:30 P. M.-Student Fellowship
Supper.
6:30 A. M.-President Alexander
G. Ruthven will speak on "Stu-
dent Responsibility.'
ST. ANDREW'S
EPISCOPAL CHURC
Division and Catherine Streets
Reverend Henry Lewis, Rector
Reverend Duncan E. Mann, Assistant
8:00 A. M.-Holy Communion.
9:30 A. M.-Holy Communion.
(Student Chapel in Harris Hall).
9:30 A. M.-Church School. (Kin-
dergarten at 11 o'clock).
11:00 A. M.-Holy Cornarunion;
sermon by Mr. Lewis.
6:00 P. M.-Student Supper in
Harris Hall. Dscussion Group
led by Mr. Mann.

BE CONSISTENT
IN YOUR
RELIGION

10:06 A.
Sermon
Urge."

M.-Morning
topic: "The

Worship.
Onward

* * *
An Associated Press story tells
of three men who entered a Chi-
cago shoestore and, after holding
up the place, got fitted for a pair
'of shoes. If that had been Ann
Arbor, the_ men would have been
held up by the proprietor and given
a pair of shoes that didn't fit.
* * *
I see that the women have
been given another day on
which they may swim in the
Union pool. I object to this
strongly in view of the fact
that t+-hg.'rneed t he. manev that

11:00 A. M.-German Service.
5:30 P. M.--Student Fellowship.
7:00P. M. - Young People's
League.
ZION LUTHERAN CHURCH
Washington St. at Fifth Ave.
E. C. Stellihorn, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Service in the Ger-
man language.

FIRST CHURCH
CHRIST, SCIENTIST
409 S. Division St.
10:30 A. M.-Regular Morning
Service. Sermon topic: "UN-
REALITY."

ST. PAUL'S LUTHERAN
CHURCH
(Missouri Synod)
Third and West Liberty Sts.
C. A. Brauer, Pastor
9:00 A. M.-Bible School.

11

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