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January 07, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-01-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 7, 1931

THE MICHIGAN

DAII,

PAGE FIVE

.....ESDA.,.JANUARY--7,-1---- . .......I.C. .N....... .

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T-HETA SIGMA PHI
TO HOLD NATIONAL
ESSA COMPETITION
Any Woman Registered in School
of Journalism May Submit
An Article.
$100 PRIZE IS OFFERED
Paper May Deal With Any New
Theories or Research in
Newspaper Work. 1
Following authorization by the
National Council, Theta Sigma Phi,
national honorary and professional
journalistic society for women, is
offering a cash prize of $100 for the
best article on any phase of wom-
an's work in journalism.
Any woman who is duly registered
in a school of journalism whether
she is a graduate or undergraduate
student or. a special student may
submit an article in the contest.
The article may not be less than
1500 words in length nor more than
5,000 with 3,000 as the most suitable
length, since the committee in
charge hopes to have the articles
published in magazines. All en-
trants must send two copies of their
manuscript to Margretta Steele
Claflin, 1104 Elmwood Avenue, Co-
lumbus, Ohio, by midnight April 30,
1931.
New Theories Sought in Theses.
Although the article may deal
with any phase of journalism, it
should advance new information,
fresh proofs, or new theories as far
as possible, and should involve re-
search and original thought. The
content must deal with what wom-
en have done, or are doing, or may
do, in this field. The whole range
of journalistic work and of the his-
tory, position, opportunities, and
achievements of women in journal-
ism is open to the contestants.
In choosing a subject, it is sug-
gested that the prospective con-
testant obtain the advice and coun-
sel of the head of her department
or some member of the journalism
faculty. It is anticipated that the
article, or essay may be prepared in
connection with research work done
for her classes.
Must Be Typewritten.
All articles must be typewritten,
double or triple-spaced and writ-
ten on one side of the sheet. Each
entry should have attached to it a
sealed envelope, bearing on the out-
side the title of the article and in-
side the following information: the
name, address, school, division of
school, and year in which the au-
thor will be graduated; a statement,
signed by the head of the school
of journalism, or the faculty mem-
ber under whom the work was done,
showing that the statement as to
authorship, school, registration, etc.,
are correct and the credit, if any,
received in class work for the arti-
cle or thesis. The name of the au-
thor should not appear on the man-
uscript nor on the outside of the
envelope.
The Nationai Council of Theta
Sigma Phi will announce the award
in the October issue of the Matrix.
All communication in regard to the
contest should be sent to Margretta
Steele Claflin.
McGILL UNIVERSITY-All wo-
men who hold an arts degree from a
Canadian University are eligible to
apply for a scholarship offered by
the Canadian Federation of Uni-
versity women. The fund of $1,250.

is for traveling scholarships and
preference will be given to those
women who have completed some
graduate work and who have a def-
inite line of study planned.
You will get more out t
of your University ca-
reer if you are able to
tyesyour on nots
notes will be much full-
er if you take them in
shorthand. Hundireds of
Micnigan studentsdhave
learned typewriting and
shorthand at Hamilton
Business College. Many
have used it to earn
money on the sideaor
during vacation. You
will also find it very
valuable inyour career
after graduation.
Typewriting,
Shorthand

PAINTER REVIVES
ANTIQUATED ART'
American Makes Wax Miniatures
by Old Method.
By Cite Miller, '32.
Lost to the world for a period of
a hundred years the art of wax
miniature portraits has recentlyt
been revived by an American worn-
an artist, Ethel Frances Mundy.{
For the past fewyears Miss Mundy's
work in this field has been exhibit-
ed yearly at the Ackermann gal-
leries in Chicago. This year her an-
nual show was held during the
months of November and December.
Miss Mundy was successful in re-
discovering the lost art by a study
of the collections in the foreign art
museums, and through the aid of
a Syracuse chemist she ascertained
the exact process and material nec-
essary to the work. Through her
work on the discovery itself and
her remarkable skill in handling
the mediu, Miss Mundy has be-
come the foremost artist in this
field. All of her miniatures are char-
acterized by .a delightful perception
of color, and an unusual amount of
understanding of the modeled form.
Many of the conventions of pat-
tern which are common to nrinia-
ture artists are to be found in Miss
Mundy's work. However, in her ar-
rangement of the subject, and her
comprehension of attitudes as ex-
pressive of character she sidesteps
just enough from the traditions to
make her interesting as well as
meticulously perfect. For instance,
in her miniature portrait of the
small daughter of Mr. and Mrs.
Harold Florsheim of Ravinia she
has captured that charm of expec-
tancy, which is so characteristic of
children, by a gesture of the child's
hand, and the disregard for a doll
which the little girl holds all awry
in the other hand as she finds in-
terest in something before her.

WOINBOWLERS
BOLH~CONTINUETOUNEY'
Entrants With Highest Score in
Each Class Will Compose
Interclass Teams.
The bowling tournament now in
progress in the Women's Athletic
building will end on Jan. 16, and
will be followed by the interclassl
tournament during the week of Jan.
19, according to a statement by
Jean Perrin, '32, bowling manager
for the Women's Athletic Associa-
tion.
There is still time for any woman
student interested in bowling to
bowl 15 stringsand qualify for the
interclass teams. The present tour-
nament is for individuals, and it is
not necessary to be connected with
any dormitory, league house, or so-
rority group in order to participate.
The two or three women having the
highest scores in each class will be
chosen for the interclass tourna-
ment.
Those who wish to enter the tour-
nament now may sign their names
on the ch.art in the Women's Ath-
letic building or call Jean Perrin at
23225.
The rifle tournament is being
continued this week with advanced
students shooting from 4 to 6 on
Wednesdays and beginners at the
same hours on Tuesdays and Thurs-
days. During the week of ,Jan. 19
demonstrations will be given in the
Women's Athletic building.
WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY, Sal-
em, Oregon-An all-campus skate
party was held at Willamette Uni-
versity Dec. 13. A special program
was provided by the committee in
charge.

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ntraural...NEW

POSITION OF COUNTY PROSECUTOR
FILLED BY WOMAN IN NEBRASKA

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Dora Nelson Becomes Official,
Having Spent Early Years i
as Farm-Hand.

Schedule of Games Today.
4 o'clock-Pi Beta Phi vs. Gammaj
Phi Beta; Chi Omega vs. Alpha
Chi Omega.
5 o'clock-Kappa Kappa Gamma
vs. Adelia Cheever; Alpha Epsilon
Phi vs. Kappa Alpha Theta.
Results of Tuesday's Gaines.
League VII 12, Delta Delta Delta 6.I
This was an exceedingly rough
game, both teams doing a consider-
able amount of fumbling. League
VII was the better organized team
and was able to outplay the Tri-
Delts by well worked out formation

DoraNNelson, a girl who grew up
on a Nebraska farm and worked
I with men in the field has taken
over another "man's" job, that of
county prosecutor. She is the firstI
woman to be elected as a county
psecutor in Nebraskaand one of
ew in the United States.
Although modern farm women
usually limit their activities to
feeding chickens, caring for the
cows, and to home work, financial
conditions made it necessary for
Miss Nelson to take her place with
the farm hands in the fields.
She attended a country school
and high school, where she took a
limited course in stenography and
typewriting. Obtaining work in a
Holdredge attorney's office, shel

GRADUATE TEACHES
TURKISHCHILDREN
American Play Methods to be
Introduced in Oriental
Countries.
Guzine Ishan, a young Turkish
girl, daughter of a former governor
of Turkey, who has earned a mas-
ter's degree in hygiene and physical
instruction from Wellesley college
has returned to Angora, Turkey, to
make practical use of her knowl-
edge.
Miss Ishan plans to. train teach-
ers of physical instruction who will
help her to instill the method and
spirit of American play in the chil-
dren of Turkey. Miss Ishan says
that although Turkish children al-
ways have played,. their play has
been individual. She hopes to teach
them the spirit of American team-
work which she considers so admir-
able.
Another phase of her work will be
the organization. of classes in gym-
nastics for adults, including the of-
ficials of the capital of Turkey.
WANT ADS PAY!
DR. SCHURZ
DENTIST
Formerly of State St. is now lo-
cated at 606 First Nat'l. Bank
Bldg.
PHONE 6335

plays. was attracted to law and was ad-
mitted to practice in 1928.
Helen Newberry defaults to Jordan. Her employer was the Phelps
county prosecutor. Last year, while
Helen Newberry 32, Betsy Bar- he was away on a trip, she was ap-
bour 10. pointed acting county attorney and
Excellent guarding featured this prosecuted a number of cases suc-
game while the forwards of both cessfully.
teams displayed well-organized floor Her employer decided to retire
play. Newberry took a decisive lead from office and, with some diffi-
and was able to maintain it ---__---- -

dence, she became
was elected by a
as a republican.

a candidate. She
majority of 200

throughout the game.
League II, 12; Alpha Phi 8.
Throughout the game the League
forwards showed a better attack,
while the intensive guarding led to
many personal fouls on both sides.
The game was marked by. speed,
passing and rough play.
Chicago is the greatest railroad
center in the world and the greatest
water way center in the interior of
any continent.

"Justice, peace and tranquillity,"
she says, constitute her notion of
what the law enforcement officer is
charged with maintaining by en-
forcing the law, and she accented
the "tranquillity."
LONDON-Megan Lloyd George,
daughter of Lloyd George, famous
member of parliament, is modern
in most ways, but does not care
for automobiles. She never drives
herself but always rides behind the
family chauffeur in a car which
is a relic from pre-war times.

UNIVERSITY OF WASHINGTON
-Athena Club at the University of
Washington will sponsor a benefit
campus bridge tournament begin-
ning Jan. 9. This society hones to
make it an annual affair. Teams
consist of two players, including
both men and women.
P E N S
AND "
P E N C I L S
All snakes and all prices
A Red Arrow Place
0. D. MORRILL

COLLEGE BEAUTY SHOPPE
We Offer
Shampoo and Finger Wave .. . ..$1.00
Shampoo and Marcel ..... .... $1.00
M anicures ............... . . . . 50c
By Expert Operators
Open all Evenings Phone 22813

Sororities to Hold
Many Social Events
This Coning Week
Various social evenis are sched-
uled for this week in the sororities,
including picnics, dances, and fac-
ulty entertainments.
Theta Phi Alpha are giving an
informal dance at the chapter
house this Friday night. Sprays and
bowls of cherry blossoms will form
unique decoration for the rooms.
Mr. and Mrs. Ross T. Bittinger and
Mrs. Maude Thompson are to be
chaperons for the party.
Alpha Delta Pi are entertaining
Mrs. Cunningham Burwell, of Niag-
ara Falls, New York, as a house'
guest this week. Mrs. Burwell is an
alumnae of the local chapter of
Alpha Delta Pi.
Mrs. Phyllis Runnels, chaperon of
the Delta Gamma house, returned
today from Florida where she spent
the Christmas holidays. Delta Gam-
ma entertained Miss Elizabeth Aig-
ler, of Ann Arbor, at luncheon yes-
terday.
Miss Marian McCoench, of Ann
Arbor, is giving an indoor picnic
this Saturday night at her home on
Berkshire road, for the pleasure of
the members of Delta Zeta sorority.
Kappa Delta is holding a formal
faculty reception tomorrow night
for approximately s e v e n t y-f i v e
guests. Mrs. W. F. Hunt, and Mrs.
B. F. Bailey, patronesses of the sor-
ority, will pour.

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n t_ -- - cam-. 0 1

_____.__ i

Our Banking
Experience
. . as an asset means
nothing to us . . . unless
we can pass it on
PROFITABLY to our

314 South State Phone 6615
O wM MICH
THERADIO TELEF
OF MY DREAMS

IIGAN BELL
SHONE CO.

~i lil

patrons!
May we serve you?
FIRST NATIONAL BANK AND TRUST CO.
ANN ARBOR, MICH.
Founded in 1863

-''°-G.
r
,,//

00,

mm

(LEARANCE
OF ALL
WINTER
STYLES

DRUG STORE
Next to Hill Auditorium
727 North University Ave.
Very Special price on Houbigants Bath
Salts. Read these prices:
Regular $3.50 bottle cut to $2.49
Regular $2.75 bottle cut to $1.49
Regular $1.00 bottle cut to 79c

VICTOR RADIO R-39.
(000,, - ,-

Telephone
Home
Often

--

Ilk

Free "Sniff" for a cold

That's what the smartest
women ofthis town aresay-'
ing to us everydayaboutthe*
N0EW
VICTOR,f RkDI
And remember. . . Victor
craftsmanshipthroughout...
Victor dependability.. .and
the matchless miracle of
Victor tone!
Pay as you ay7.Ask about
our small deposit plan/
Price Complete
$20630
We will allow you $45.00
fo n o ld Raclin. m hono..

The Rates

Are Low

You can call the following
points from Ann Arbor
and talk for three minutes

KIDS -
REPTILES3
SUEDES
ALL SIZES

At the first sign of a cold-the first snuffle-drop in at any of our
stores. Ask for a whiff of Sniff-the new and remarkable inhalant.
Instant relief and no charge. Enough for a day, then if delighted
buy a bottle-35 or 60 cents.
Use on your handkerchief day times, on your pillow at night.
Then keep handy to stop any cold at the start. Sniff is helping
countless people to keep free from cold all winter.

for the rates shown.

,

DAY STATION-TO-STATION RATES
4:30 a. m. to 7:00 p. m.

li

Remember, with any purchase made
stores you receive dollar for dollar

at our
in Red

Detroit . . . . . . . $ .30
C r r _1_ (;

Grand Rapids .. .$ .80

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