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December 16, 1930 - Image 2

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-12-16

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

i i i ij j

THE MIHIGAN AILY UESDAY, DECEMBER 16, 1930'

ELETRIALP0tER[HJAPANESE ERHUK
ASFIEAN,

TAKES

250 LIVES

I ',, ,K F'vAtt ^ IN 'S GRANDDAUGHTER I
Irv j_.X Uc IL RECEIVES FAMOUS TOY

;T'ORMs DEVASTATE HOMES

Two lee are reelis will comprise
t,, ;,r>>r_ _11 a. the meeting of the
Ann Arbor branch of the MichiganI.
be hed at 7:310cl-c ktomorrow
nright in room 302, MNason hail.

LONDON (A') - Little Princess
Elizabeth, granddaughter of King
George, has been given an old hob-,
by horse ghat has amused royal!
children for several generations. It,
was at the home of Princess Mary!
until the vonp Lord -i Tles-11 hr 1

WANT ADS PAY!
WE RENT R d o
WE SERVIC WSE
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP
Tel. 2-2812 615 E. William

4

Natural Resources

Substituted

for Muscular Effort Caused
Great Changes.
PLANTS MORE EFFICIENT
D _Rression Will Continue Due
to Power Investment by
Farmers, Says Wyer.,
Probably no engineering e tiom
is more before the public tday
than that of electric power distri-
bution, said Samuel S. Wyr, con-
suting engineer of the Fue- Pov -
er-transportation Educa tion faun-,
dation, of Columbus, 0., speking;
yesterday in Natural Science Uudi-!
torium on "The Funcameitals Uca
Electrical Power Distribution."
"In the past 29 years, there has
been a physical acceleration in
civilization without parallel in his-
tory," Wyer said. "In the last
three-quarters c a century, we
have made more changes than in
all preceding time by substituting
natural resources for former mus-
cular efforts"
Only Small Part Used.
In spite of its rapid development,
he said, electric power is only a
small part of the total mechanical
'energy used. Even if all the avail-
able water power were harnessed,
the- amount of electricity produced
Would fall far below the amount
now necessary.
As an example of the effects of
power development, Wyer cited the
condition of the farmer today. "The
farmer's use of mechanical power
has been. greatly increased without
a corresponding increase in his in-
come," he said. The result is that
economic depression will continue,
hie remarked. "We shall have more
suffering in the next 10 years than
in the past 10," he said.
Energy comes practically from
fuel or from water power, he said,
and in the last seven years we have
revolutionized power plant design
raising the efficiency of fuel plants
so that more than 35,000 miners
have- been thrown out of employ-
ment.
. Cost of Generation Small.
The cost of generation is a re-
latively small part of power money
output, he said. About 67 per cent
of. the total cost to the consumer is
for the local distribution plants in
towns and cities.
"Water power, in general, re-'
quires greater investment t h a n
steam power," he said. "Easily
three-fourths of the water power
projects in the United States have
resulted in loss to investors. The
increased efficiency of coal steam
power makes it cheaper than hyd-
ro-electric power."
The average domestic consumer
uses electric power only a short
time during the day, Wyer remark-
ed. Twenty-four hour plant opera-
tion costs must be taken from one
or two hours of use. In a fair dis-
tribution system, the short-hour
consumer must pay more than the
facstory ovher wrho uses power con-
tinuously.
Rural Consumer Troublesome.
"Probably the most troublesome
factor in the present power pro-
ram is the rural consumer," Wyer
said. "Electric power would raise
the rural standard of living, but it
will always cost more to get electri-
cit-y to the rural home than to the
urban home." Furthermore, he
said, the income of the average
farmer does not permit installa-
t.ion of the usual labor saving de-
vicecs. This raises a definitie social
problem: Because of inability of
the young- farmer to provide con-
veniences, rural marriages will be
deferred, the birth iate will be de-
creased, and increass in birth rate
will appear 'among the lower cages
of humanity.
Electric power distribution in-

duces many such new social prob-
lems, he said. The public is contin-
ua lly misinformed with regard to
17o 'y e extensions. It is in the in-
teetof the public to have reli-
ablein ormation.

Gllarles P. TMoy7er, '31, wT.ho hasI 0i.
coa rtv ncrpsd1'an atics, Is---ugrw t
szU Kv~ne ea hrr John 1I
a '''n'llarrion."
I t);f'" 1 th C h'
)2~2V_ ! !' 1 IQ eOi

5 .auto 1 ttt JLGIIC.S} 1101 '

istmasSug tin

6 vri'~tod Proer, Phatn
Wreckage of the recent eartafh a i aa. U n, Awhich cost 250 eives, injurcu zoo and ttesi&oyed
8,000 homes. Photo shows troops oft °A J_ ee :~-ia rmy marching in to guard the ru-ns.'h -
sands of persons were left destitute by the terrific, force of ihe smock and the subsequent fiee and ston-is

4 y '
l
pi
Ct

GUNTAIN

PE :s

314 Soutl? State tr
Tihetaineyan ype1it) Car
(PiENTEVENSI NGS

STATIONERY

INCREASE IN JAPANESE PULA IO
SEEN AS ACTIVE MENACE TO NATION

Emigration Practically Denied
Over-Populated Empire
in Far East.

tion with its manufacturing indus-
tries, impro cements in agriculture,
and pen i iiis ot spec iization
through forei -x irade 3was f ollowed

i
t
j

Co mmittee to Discuss
Planes for Senior Ball
Preliminary plans for this year's
Senior Ball will be discussed at a
meeting of the committee in charge
at 7:30 o'cioci: tomorrow night in
room 302 of the Union.
The meeting has been called by
Vinal 0. Taylor, '31, chairman of
the general committee. Chairmen

z'
4
i

{ >>. - :
., ., .,]
i'

/11210

iI

A Red Arrow ;Mte

by a rapnlid iv-1reaee in- population.
Limitation of the number ofj he exlained.
people and of the increase of pro- ,4
duction was cited yesterday in a "The death rate in Japan is high
radio address by Prof. Robert Hall, and it asnot dliminished," Pro-1
of the geography department, as' icsor mall said. "in spite of the!
apctinorteonly means of solving Japans Iappicationlcof wehstIebedineusj1
problem of overpopulation. sresi itin of~tigthradl
"Regardless of where we look," c 7 ti thradl
he said, "there- seems to be no in z' ong irhas .Te nres
possibility of solving the question i o finhspro f.ressed by1
through emigration. The Hawaiia n gbmticrt oud tpesntth
slnsand western United States Inet ire s li sout one million
Japan'~~~heet frshincreasing populationbtsad te ouatoafJaana
these doors are now definitely shxut. doubled, that is from 30 to 60f
Brazil," he explained, "is at present minion."
receiving about 8,000 Japanese seat- -' irn - lni that at first the
tlers each year, but this is not p- 1&(_j ia increase-was regardedE
enough to help conditions appre- asa cua? etiig Professor Hall
ciably and probably will not con- s4 zi that "tdaythe apanmese gov-
tinue for long." I e' 'm-ent c~sth Le increasing
The coming of western civiliza- Ppulation ~tine, raost imrportant
- -. -Iproblem c onfrontiii tle govern-
_________________ v-- s--n + "r -srw I e '

of sub-committees in charge of ar-
ranging for an orchestra. daecora.-
tions, and programs will be ap-
pointed, he said. The group is also
to discuss a possible date for the
ball.
f WATLING
I LERCHEN&
Members
I New York Stock Exchange
Detroit. Stock Exchange
New York Curb (Associate)
Dealers in
Investment
I Securities
Accounts Carried
for Clients
Mezzanine Floor
FI RST NATIONAL
BANK. BLDG.
Phones: 23221-23222

SPEIALTRAINS-
accoullt.
CHISMS VACATION
Friday, December 19th-
~ bJ~ !7B UND:rvi A in Arii-o- 11:00 a m. {Ceintral Tume) arriving Toledo 1:15
p. im. (pastern "Jirne}, making all Toledo connections. _
ORT j ' [ Leave Ann Arbor 5:15 p. in. (Central TThe) arriving Durand 6:45 -
r p. m., Owos';o 7:20 . in., connecting with Grand Trunak and Michigan
.Central for Flint, Port Huron, Pontiac, Saginaw, Bay City, etc. .:
SOU Y'BOU D:Regular Train-Leave Ann Arbor 2:16 p.im. (Central Time) arriving -
Toledo 4:55 p. m. (Eastern Time) connecting with all lines diverging.
Special Train Service from Toledo
Fu acemeatonof RETURNING JANUARY 4, 1931
f : canifcl.tirzofstudents returning to Ann Arbor following Christmas vacation, THE ANN ARBOR .:
E i ..: iu1 erat a SPECIAL TRAIN from Toledo to Ann Arbor, leaving Toledo at 6:45 p. in. (East-
en 'i.0e Sunday, January 4, 1931.
P urch-ase tickets and check baggage in advance to avoid delay and confusion at train time.
A A'I' AL L RAD
IR. V. OLDHAM, Hf. A. MILLS,
General Passenger Agent, Commercial Agent,
Toledo, Ohio Ann Arbor, Mich. ,.

XWhat's
Going i
On
THEATREL3
Lydia Mendelssohn -- Christmas
program;. Moliere's "Affec Led Mis-',
ses," "Dingley Dell;" Sponsor-A by
the League and Play Produc't__a;
Special music.
Majestic-"Just Imagine" with El,
Brendel, Marjorie White, Maureen
O'Sullivan.
Michigan -- Wallace Beery and!
Marie Dressler in "Min and Bill."
Varsity Glee club sings in Pathe
newsreel. Also personal appeariance
of Glee club at evening perform-r
ance.
Wuerth-Ilarold Lloyd in "F'eetE
-First."
Physics Celcl oquiuin - Dr. J. D.
ulanawalt Un '>X-Fiy Absorpto
vfolecules;" 4:;15 o'clock, room 10.Gl
last Physics building.
Exhibit---Last day; etchings and+
Ingravings by Chamaberlain anod
Decaris; ; Until 5 o'clock, west gal-
ery, Alumni Memorial hall.

IIi spite ol' the many handicaps
and gloomy forecasts which have
accompan~ed the increase in popu-
lation, aa has ex>perienced a
stea:3y risin standard of living
among its people, and has risen in
a half century froml an obscure
feudal state to one of the world's'
greatest powers, he concluded.

Pnbfic Liability
and PoeryDamage
Premium
;j 1n,-I dig (lub and Emergency
Road Service.
(-;r'd and Chevrolet-------$X516.00
18.00
k Sta--idar-d .... ... . 19.00
F~~~c .. Mc......-------21.00
D31;_.u x--------19.00
Pontia-----------------18.00
Hi ti-------------20.00
Odic: C=. ,s in Proportion.
Phone Offiey 7912
Phone t, T'sidence 9790
2 L .W~CER
GCtNERAL INSURZANCE
i 33? .!South l\Lain St.

1-I

III

I

I

Adm l ~ll'L: -l TIJOY MONTH SPECIAL
ALL SPATS l0c to 2 O'CLOCK

k

Mats.
2:00
3:40

MAJESTIC

Eves.
7:00
9.:00

THIS
is
TOY
MONTH

_____Last Times To-Dayr
"JUST
EL M.,-ME DEL IMAGINEs;
STARTING WEDNESDAY

IT IS IHAD TO
for
Quality & Service
in
Shoe Repairing
1109 South University

Comfortable shoes mean a lot. Alfred's
famous tubular ice skates have special
form-fitting shoes... assuring the high-
est degree of comfort. Everything about
them is perfect and fine. And they are
very moderately priced.
The Choice of Champions

1, lam ' o
":

I

P EN S
AN D
PEFN C I
Aff miakes and all

SI
prices

A Reed Arrow Place
0- D. MORRILL
".d South State St. Phone

6615 1

INI
"MIN AND EL
TWO GREAT STARES TOGi3TH tk
AT LASTI
- - - - - ---v'cw - v- - ' - -"v---r-.-'v- --v-v.".. ". r-- --a --.--.. .,..er ..
UOSPEC __.CJ
Ontl tage iniPersoni
at 8:50
p SHORT bJiS
wTI-$ , VICTORS"---PArIT1i1F~l:
"WHIO KILLED ROVER"
c'-v V'- Iy'N ~

vi9

aclo

N

c
&O

t

4

w sm
Fudgawwd

SHOWING
NOW

4 ' .P;
_,
. - k' r
_ . ,

2:00, 3:40
7.00, 9:00

in

4
A Oualpty Oixtfit for Recrinn rs

CIfASJ.
G JO-ANN Y
sIi'

I

Youthful!
Pepf ul!
Tuneful!
Flu p

0

2

I

I.E

I

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