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November 16, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-16

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SUND)AY. 0, QJ!MDb',1G 1

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE THRE

__
___ _ _ _ _
.. __ ...

Easterny Woman, En gi er ng
Consultant, to Speak Here
Tomorow Mowng.

PROMIN ,NT A5

AJTH. --

Speaker Is Assistant to Wood
in Conducting Relief Wor
for Unemploye:.
Juniors and seniors in the en-
neering college will be excued
from 11 o'clock cias,; tomorrow
to hear Dr. Lillian M. G lbreth
speak on "Work Analysis, a ,unc-
tion of Management," in the Lydin
Mendelssohn theatre.
Dr. Gilbreth, who is a consul'iag
engineer in Montclair, N. J., has
achieved distinction as an author,
engineer, and speaker. At the
present time she is a consultant in
the analysis of working methods.
She has assisted in developing
methods and devices of motion and
fatigue study, and has made sev-
eral contributions to the literature
of this field, among which are "Mo-
tin Study" "Fatigue Study", "Ap-
plied Motion Study," written in
collaboration with her husband,
and "The Psychology of Manage-
ment." She is also noted as the
author of two books of a some-
what different scope, "The Home-
maker and Her Job," and "Liv-
ing With Our Children."
Dr. Gilbreth was one of two wo-
men among the delegates sent by
American engineering societies to
an international engineering con-~
ference held last year in Japan.
Last month she was appointed by
President Hoover to serve on the
committee on unemployment, in
charge of unemployment of women.
Is Graduate of Stanford.
Dr. Gilbreth was graduated first
from Leland Stanford university,
and later from Brown university.
In recognition of her work in engi-
neering fields, she received an hon-
orary degree of master of engi-
neering from the University of
Michigan in 1928, and Rutgers col-
lege bestowed upon her an honor-
ary degree of doctor of engineer-
ing in 1929. She is a member of
the American Psychological asso-
ciation, the American Society of
Mechanical Engineers, the Taylor
society, and an honorary member
of the Society of Industrial lngi-
neers.
DIES AT1U0bPIT91L
Deceased Was Head of Courses
in Economics; Taught in
Ohio and Illinois.
Prof. Carroll H. May, of the eco-
nomics department, died at the
University hospital late Friday.
night following a two-year illness
of heart disease.
Professor May was born at Kings-
ton, Sept. 15, 1883, and attended
Ohio Wesleyan university, from
which he obtained his bachelor of
arts degree in 1903. Following sev-
eral years in graduate study of
Latin and Greek, he received his
doctor of philosophy degree from
Harvard. He taught these subjects
until 1920 at several institutions in-
eluding the University of Illinois
and Ohio and the Parsons and
Simpson colleges in Iowa. Since
1921, he has been instructor and
assistant professor of economics, in
charge of courses in elementary
economics and economic satistics
here.
Funeral services will be hld at
3 o'clock this afternoon at 2012
Washtenaw. Burial will be in For es
Hills cemetery. Surviving are his
wife, a daughter, and two sons.
TIME EXTENDED
Until January 1, 1931 for
papers to be in on

"WHAT TO KNOW IN
BUYING ORIENTAL
RUGS
(Near Eastern o Chiese)
TWO-FIFTY DOLLAR and
ONE TWENTY-FIVE
DOLLAR FEIRLOOM
HANDMADE CHINESE
RUGS ARE TO BE GIVEN
AS PRIZES
for the paper contain-I.-ire most
facts. (The English used or the way
it is written do not count.)
Also a NINIE-Dr,' MATtoj
the child in or under the sith gra
who writes correctly, i ot s-
tences, the greates: unber C
meanings of the Oriental Symbl.
Full Directions at the Temporary

- "A -TYS PRINCE
HOPES FOR CAREER
- r
A CA/ /4 'erc a 6 {k}, 00)
.7.
i~~.Lows ibhenzoozcrn
rimc on of the former Kaiser,
riled in New York from Argen
tia hien to start an industrial
carer uider Henry Ford.
l S
E LE .ON D
v.
LitearylPubicaiontRotpea
Variety of MaterKial.
Combining an increased size with
he policy of including material of
Swider scope, the November issue I
of the Inlander, the first number
)f the year, will go on sale tomor-
raW morning on the campus, Har-
d Courlander, '31, editor of the
boVk, said yesterday.a
The cover for the issue was de-
oigned by Robert Wesley, a student
ot the Detroit School of Fine and
mpplied Arts, who won the J. L.
iudson prize and Albert Kahn
tward for 1930. '
William d German, '31, musi
hd drama editor for The Daily,
idas contributed an article on the
3om, "Ash Wednesday," by T. S.
Aliot, while the Exposition Dela-
roix is described by Peter Ruthven,
32, who has recently returned from
ais and Montparnasse.
Among the features of the maga-
ane is the photograph of the
3ronze of Paul Robeson by Antonio
hasemme with a short history of
ts career by the sculptor. "Negro
bciritual," as the statue of the
amed Negro baritone and actor isI
2aiied, is at present in the Brook-;
yn Institute of Art after a seriesI
of unusual events.

f' PAi ENJT'j jfl fl

Thomas, B'ake,Christ nan, Allen,
I ,wler, Maddock to Speak
Over Radio This Week.
ONE SPEECH REQUESTED
ss Edith Thmzdirector of
lbrary exi'nion sriCe of the
Ui versity, wil speak at 5 o'clock
today on "Reading for Pleasure and
Profit," during the Parents pro-
gram broadcast from tha Univers-
ity studio. Frank Ryan will be the
soloist on the program.
During the Michigan University
of the Air program Monday after-
noon Prof. Warren E. Blake, of the
Greek department, will take for his
subject, "That's All Greek to Ms.'
In the talk he will ciscu s the
Greek contributions to modern
civilization. George Poiner, violin-
ist, accompanied at the piano by
Stanley Fletcher, will furnish the,
musical program.
The physiological chemistry de-
partment of the University will be
represented on Tuesday's broad cast,
when Prof. Adam A. Christman
will discuss "The Effect of Light on
a Living Organism." Raymond
Morin will present piano solos.
The first request program will be'
broadcast Wednesday afternoon. In
response to a listener's request
Harry Allen, of the speech depart-
ment, will talk on "The Mechanics
of Putting on a Play." Sidney?
Straight, tenor, will be the soloist.
"Paper and Its Uses" will be dis-
cussed Thursday afternoon by Don-
ald W. McCready, of the chemical
engineering department. The Mid-
nite Sons Quartet will furnish the
musical program.
Three of the largest schools in
the University, the engineering,
the architectural, and the medical
school will be represented on the
Michigan Night program, Saturday,
Nov. 22, which goes on the air at
7:30 o'clock and continues until
8:30 o'clock.
Prof. Herbert A. Fowler will dis-
cuss "Interior Decoration," Prof.
W. A. Wood will speak on "Stain-
less Steel," and Dr. W. G. Maddock
will take as his subject "Stomach
Ache." The School of Music Sym-
phony orchestra, under the direc-
tion of David Mattern, will present
the music for the program.
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-,
Philip D. LaFollette, governor-electI
of Wisconsin, will continue to con-
duct his two weekly lectures in the
law school here until the end of the
7emcstsr.

'Honor' Feathers Were Prized as struction of the war ineaadress, ac-
Signs of Warrior's cording to a card explaining its
Rank, Valor, significance, required sundry ma-
-___terials: eagle plumes, eagle down,
A glance at a colorful case in the horsehair, and especially the skins
University museum will convince of weasels in winter pelage.
one that there was a time when the In the wearing of the bonnet the
presence of a fan meant the pre- Indian once again demonstrated
sence of a gentleman of import. I his exclusiveness. Indeed, attaining
nthe various degrees of tribal honor
Picturing in color the dress of our was almost as difficult an accom-

DUNIVERSITY MUSEUM EXHIBIT SHOWS
[I DDAAMERIND'S LIKING FOR PLUME FANS

State and County
Likewise to Show

martial ancestral red man, the dis-
play reveals the predominance of
fancies in the routine of Indian
life.I
TMlade from eagle feathers and
ornaments with vari-colored bead-
work, the fan was always carried
by men of importance as a token
of honor and dignity when they
attended public meetings and war
councils. According to :n explana-
tion by museum officials, the eagle
feather fan was as significant to
Indiantdignitaries as are the high
silks hat and gold-headed cane to
our own worthies. (Picture Herbert
Hoover or Merton Bell carrying a
feathered fan yg
There were more than ordinary
feathers, too; the honor feather
ranked foremost in the feather
world. Relative to Indian heraldry
its use was governed by a definite
code. No man could wear a feather
unauthorized. If he did, he may as
well have received the Croix de
Guerre or the Congressional Medal.
To earn the privilege of wearing
an honor feather, a man must have
presented evidence of a deed of
valor, corroborated by the testimony
of witnesses. The red man's record
of achievement was indicated by
the position of his feather, and by
the various ways in which the vane
of the feather was cut. Incidentally,
the painted warrior didn't believe
in equal suffrage, for women were
never privileged to wear honor
plumes.
Of course the enemies of the
American pioneer possessed their
war bonnets-and of course they
were feather bonnets. The con-
CGmedy Club Tryouts
to Read From Plays
Fall tryouts for Comedy club will
meet at 3:15 Tuesday in room 302
Mason hall, according to an an-
nouncement made yesterday by the
president. All students interested,
except freshmen, will read a three-
minute selection from a play of
their own choice.
Announcemtn was also made of
the selection of three men for
Comedy club membership following
their technical work in Olympia,
Charles Monroe, '31, Robert Mc-
Donald, '31, and Lester Lemke, '31.

CITY WILL LOWER
WINTER TAX RATE

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEFS

I

plishment as one's attempting to
achieve Michigamua. Only the
select warrier could sport the bon-
net, since each feather in the hat
symbolized a valiant deed, duly
accredited and awarded bydproper
authorities. The number of feath-
ers in a man's bonnet was thus
the tale of his career.
Dr. Sturgis Addresses
MedicalAssociatior
Dr. Cyrus C. Sturgis, director of
the Simpson Memorial institute, re-
turned yesterday from Louisville,
Ky., where he attended a meeting
of the Southern Medical associa-
tion.
While in Louisville, Dr. Sturgis
addressed the medical association
on the subject of ",pernicious Anae-
mia."

i

Winter tax rates for county,
school and state are less for 1930
than last year, Herbert W. Crippen,
city assessor, announced yesterday.
The winter tax for this year has
ben set at $25.4$ per $1,000 as
against the total of $27.38 for 1929,
or a drop of $1.90 per $1,001. The
state tax will be $4.40 per $1,000,
the county tax $7.08 per $1,090 aed
the school tax $14 per $1,000.

Assessmentr>1
DPrciase.I

Council, Public Works
Board Plan Meetipgs
Meetings of the city council and
board of public works are sched-
uled for this week.
Transaction of routine business
wil be included in the meeting of
council at 7:30 o'clock Monday
night, and the aldermen will also
hear communications and petitions
from citizens and council commit-
tees. Consideration of the increased
water rate proposal, which last
week was postponed, will not be
I made until the first regular meet-
i ing in December.

kr

REV. DANIEL A. McGREGOR

Western Theolc
St. Andr$ws Church
Harris Hall - -

ogical

Seminary

- - 11:Q00,. M.
- - 6:00p.m.

1'
77. 1 TM- TOP

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"CASH & CARRY"

MIRACLEANED and BLOCKED
5 CONVENIENT CASH AND
CARRY STORES
214 S. State St.
1115 S. University Ave.
703 Packard
701 S. State (Cor. Monroe)
113 E. Liberty St.

C 4iracldeta
'lckan akv latbreath of cfiring

11'31

11

11

111111

'§ 11

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