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October 01, 1930 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-01

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

LAND |LABM(D LIPTON DECLARES HE WILL AGAIN ( (ni | Tu
EXPOHT TRE E YACHTING OMPRISE INITIL
UNITED STATES :I:E A:TSEXHIBIT

CITY NEWS IN BRIEF
WARNS AGAINST PEDDLERS. room of the Union, and another in
Miss Edith Owens, executive the billiard room. Reception of the
secretary of the Community Fund game will begin at approximately
Association, has requested all Ann (1:30 o'clock this afternoon from
Arbor citizens to be on the lookout Shibe park, Philadelphia. Hun-
for peddlers who have been spatted dreds of students will listen in over
in neighboring cities claiming to private radios to the direct broad-
represent the "Good Deed Chil- casting which is being sent through
dren's Society" of Chicago. As no all major Detroit stations and na-
such organization is listed and no tional hook-ups.

'MUSEUM CUA R
EXPLAI1NS EXHIBITS
OF A9NCIENT LND
Dr. Orma Butler Discusses Aitm
of Foreign Archaeological
Expeditions.

Planning to
Into Solid

Weld1

i

Economic Bloc.
TRADE OUTLETS
n Representatives Meet,
Formulate Greater
Market Play.
(By Associated Press)
)N, Sept. 30.-English busi-
, alarmed at the rapidly
g export trade of the
tates, are going to try to
British Emrpire into one
iomic block' at the imper-
rence which starts here
ay.
esentatives Assemble.
mtatives of the various:
s, mainly the political'
the various states within
h commonwealth like Gen..
prime minister of the1
f South Africa, Prime
Scullin of Australia and
McGilligan, minister for
affairs of the Irish Freel
i assembling for the con-
ad available today a re-
wn up by the imperial
e preparatory committee;
plains the purposes and
the conferees. .'
-s Strong Necessity.

Professor Donaldson Annot
Five Exhibitions for
Season.
SCULPTURE INCLUL

Luflcs

DISPLAYS

COLLECTIONS

Works to be Representative of permit has ben extended by the
Ann Arbor Chamber of Commerce
European and American for such a cause, residents are
Schools. warned against giving sums of any
----kind and have been asked by police
Five exhibitions of paintings and to notify them in case of such oc-
sculpture from European and Amer- currences.

i

Associated Press Photo
Undaunted after five failures to take back to Britain the internation-
:0 yatching trophy, Sir.Thomas Lipton declared he would challenge again
for the America's Cup. He is shown (center) leaving New York city hall
after a call on Mayor James Walker before sailing back to England.

present the United States
only 8 per cent of her total
ion. If she were to increase
only 1 pe'r cent this would
nt an increased ex.port of
),000, which is equavalent to
cent of the total of British
and would mean additional
competition for British in-
n the markets of the world."
herited Son Gets
tate of $3,000,000
(By Associated Jress)
A.DELPHIA, -Sept. 29.-The
e court, today overruled on
unds of error the orphans';
,nd entered a decree giving
00,000 estate of the late Al-
Ford to his only child,
n M. Ford.-
s will disinherited the son
bulk of the estate was be-
d to the University ofl
.vania for establishing a,
of fruit culture.
was president of Ford and
g, pipe manufacturers. He
arch 22, 1920, and his estate
n in litigation ever since,.

Camels Hod -FirstI
Rank, Luckies Next
in Popular Survey
Camels and Lucky Strikes lead
in popularity among the men ont
the campus, according to a survey
of the various fraternity houses by
men sent out by a prominent to-
bacco company. "The older menI
seem to prefer Camels, and the
younger ones Luckies," they said.
In order to aid in collecting
these statistics these men have
been presenting to each . student
interviewed a free package of their
cigarettes. "Chesterfields and Old
Golds are third and fourth respect-
ively in popularity. Other brands
are smoked by only a small portion
of the campus," they said.,
When asked if they intended to
carry their survey on into the
sorority houses they replied that if
the officials would permit, they
would be interested to do so.

S. A.R. GIVES $600
FOR FELLOWSHIP
Society Offers Award to Further
Study of State History.
Appropriation of $600 a year for
the purpose of founding a fellow-
ship in American history at the
University was announced recently
by the Michigan society of the Sons
of the American Revolution.
According to the Michigan Com-
patriot, which: is the official publi-
cation of the state chapter of the
society, the aim of this gift is to
further the investigation and the
study of' events which occurred dur-
ing the Revolutionary war in Mich-
igan and the surrounding territor-
ies. At present, it is expected that
the society will maintain the fellow-
ship for two years, thus allowing
two students to make an intensive
study of the state's history.
The society has received letters
of appreciation for the gift from
officials of the University.

ican schools will comprise the pro-
gram of the division of fine arts FILL HOLD FUNERAL .
during the present season, Prof. Funeral services for William F.
Dodd, Lodi township farmer who
Bruce M. Donaldson of the fine arts accidentally shot himself while
department announced yesterday. climbing over a fence on his farm
Exhibits of fine ' black and whites late Monday evening, will be held
are also included in the schedule, he tomorrow afternoon at the Muehlig
further stated. chapel with Rev. E. C. S.tellhorn
Feature American Sculpture officiating. An inquest was not
thought necessary by Dr. Edwin C.
The first exhibition is on at pres- Ganzhorn, coroner, who investi-
ent showing modern French paint- gated the circumstances this morn-
ings and will run through October ing.
9. The second exhibit will include
American wor. s in sculpture and TO BROADCAST SERIES.
will be on view sometime in Novem- Among the many local radio re-
ber, the exact date not havinag been ceptions of the World's Series to
decided..
Csermrbe heard today two will be open to'
Conservauve .merican paintings Michigan students, one in the tap
will be featured in the third exhibi- -s
tion which will take place in Janu-
ary while black and whites and HILLEL ARRANGES
etchings will be shown at the fourth'i
exhibit-in"March. The fifth and FRESHMEN MIXER
last exhibit will be of modern Amer-
I ican paintings. It will take place in
May. Bnai Brith Hillel foundation's
Held in Alumni Hall fifth year on the Universitycampus
All showings will be held in the began officially Sunday morning
galleries of Alumni Memorial hall, with the annual freshman mixer
I probably in the west gallery where for men and women at the founda-
the present exhibition is going on, tion on East University avenue.
and will each be of two weeks dura- Approximately 75 new students
tion. The admission is free to all 'were welcomed by Dr. Raphael
exhibits. Isaacs, assistant director of the
Simpson memorial. Byron Novitsky,
"dr d president, and other student officersf
Hopwood Will Provides I also spoke.-
for Two Poetry Prizes, Announcement was also made of
----)a banquet of welcome on October
In addition to the five major 26 for the new director of the foun-
awards of $2500 and the six minor dation, Rabbi Bernard Heller, past
awards of $250 for creative v/iting rabbi of the Madison Avenue Temple
announced recently as part of the of Scranton, Pennsylvania. Rabbi
Avery Hopwood and Jule Hopwood Heller, :an outstanding American-
prizes, two awards of $250 will be Jewish philosopher, and author of
given for creative work in poetry. It "A Harvest of Weeds," as well as
was also announced yesterday by many other manuscripts on world
the English department that $2001 peace, succeeds Adoplh H. Fink.
had been set aside for the produc- Rabbi Fink has left Ann Arbor to
tion of the best three-act play and assume4he pulpit of a congregation
the three best one-act plays of the ! in Spokane, Washington, one of the
1 year. largest in the west.

FIND MAN'S BODY.
The body of an unidentified man
was recovered from the Huron river I
at Ypsilanti Monday. Police de-
scribed the man as being about 40,
years of age. He had red hair, was
slightly bald, weighed 125 pounds,
and was of short stature. The body
is believed to have been in the
river about two weeks.
FORESTRY.'SERVICE[
STUD ENTSSUCCEEDU
Game Conservation, Experiment
Stations Offer Wide Field
for Graduates.
Recent reports from the School
of Forestry and Conservation indi-
cate that many of th egraduates of
last year are well on the way to4
1making places for themselves.
RnNumbered ,;mong those who re-I
ceived their master's degree from
the University last year- are Russell
R. Reynolds,, '29F, who iseat work
I for the Southern Forest Service'
s experimental station with head-
quarters at New Orleans; Philip
R. Wheeler, '29F, who is at present
in Brazil as a member of the new,
1 Brazilian forest service recently
organized under a plan submitted
by Prof. D. M. Matthews of the
School of 'Forestry and' Conserva-
tion; Roy'; C. Brundage who is a
member of the Florida Forest Serv-
4ice; and ,'Ronald L. Bird who is
connected with the state game divi-
sion of Michigan.
From the forestry school class of
'30, Roland . Burgie is connected
with the .county forestry depart-
ment in Los Angeles, California;
Russell A. Bonninghausen is at
work with ,the Michigan land eco-
nomic survey; and Leonard A.
Pritchard and Ross A. Stevens
worked the past summer with Dr.
Ned Dearborn on a survey of the
fur-bearing . animals of. Michigan.
In addition to these men, five from
the class' of '30 have returned to
earn their, masters' degrees.

Describes University's Activity
in Unearthing Material
of Classic Sites.
"We are trying to bring together
material found on ancient classic
sites that will throw some light on
what the ancient people ate, wore,
and did," stated Dr. Orma F. Butler,
curator of the University Museum
of Classical Archaeology, in an in-
terview yesterday.
"We have exnibitions here of
foodstuffs from Egypt, casts of
Roman coins, a series of reliefs de-
picting ancient costumes, tools for
spinning 'and weaving, lead water
pipes, pottery, baskets, toys, ash
urns, building materials, and nu-
merous other articles of interest,"
he said.
Have Museum Records
A trip through the rooms hous-
ing the cased articles revealed that
the collections are grouped by sub-
jects, arranged with a view of
throwing light on the personalities
of the people who used them. The
exhibit incidentally aids interpre-
tations of the classical authors, in-
asmuch as they furnish tangible il-
lustrations of the subjects about
which they have written,
Every one of the objects owned
by the Museum, of which there are
over 10,000, represents not only ar-
duous work spent in unearthing
them, but also considerable time
used in classifying them. Museum
records for each -article must in-
clude the name and identification
number of the object, the name, of
the place where it was found, a dig
number, the date of collection and
the name of the collector, the date
when it was received by the muse-
um, arid the name of the person
who . turned it over to the Uni-
versity.
Work Started in 1924
Since the summer of 1924, the
University has had at least one ex-
pedition in the field constantly. The
first work sponsored by the Uni-
versity was that done at Antioch in
Pisidia. The excavation at Karanis
in Egypt, which has been in prog-
ress since the fall of 1924, has been
directed by three research experts.

, . ....,.. ~K ........A..

JNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN ORATORICAL ASSOCIATIO

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THE OUTSTANDING UNIVERSITY ENTERTAINMENT OF THE YEAR
PRESENTS
SIX OF THE WORLD'S MOST NOTED FIGURES OF TODAY

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I,
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II
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I

COUNT VON LUCKNER
Ti'e f'amiousi Sca-J'vil and Germany'e outs
hiero
~M UCCANJLERJNG CRUISE"

GRAND DUCHESS
MARIE OF RUSSIA

Daughter of King George and Qucen Olga
in
"MY OLD WORLD BACKGROUND FOR
MODERN LIFE"

A

GILBERT K, CHESTERSON
Fngland's Supreme Li rcary Genniu
"'The Age of Unreason"

WILLIAM HARD

ADMIRAL RICHARD E. BYRD

Foremost Washington Correspondent
"tWhat Makes Pol icans That Way"

A

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