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November 12, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-12

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 1930

THE MI~CIAN f)AT.Y

PAGE TTIRR

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 12, 19~0 PAGE TI~E~

RUIKYEN TO SPEAKBulders Believe 'Ente', New German
Al CAMUS FDRUM Aeropiane Will be 'Tailspin
ON FUTURE POL1CYa ____ A-

Proot'

TVIIT' What'
Going
To Head Committee on Physical On

,
x7
Z

CONLIFEWILL
ADDRESS FORUM
cto Discuss Institute
of Pacific Relations.
Prof. J. B. Condliffe of the Eco-
nomies deparunent will address an
un erha ional f&m on the subject,
lThe Insttute of Pacific Relations,"
at 3:30 o'clock Sunday afternon in
the Upper room at Lane hall. Pro-
fessor Condliffe has been connected
w h the Institute of Pacific rela-
ius for some time, and is well
qualified to discuss problems relat-
ing to couniries bordering on the
Pacifi.

Plans for University Will
Discussed by President
Tomorrow.

be

Health Stiiy.
COURTIS TO BE PRESENT

Thcate-s.
Majestic - "Song of
with John McCorma ,k.
MichigaM--"Those Th
" ,. .> -- L;n i6 r nt

My tleart'
ree Fren h

ARE OF VITAL CONCERN
Frederick B. Fisher's Lecture
Postponed; to be Given
on Tuesday.
A president of the University, for
the first time in several decades,
will speak to students on the sub-
ject of the future plans of the insti-
tution when Pres:dent Alexander
Grant Ruthven addresses an all-
campus forum at 4:15 o'clock to-
morrow afternoon in room D Alum-
ni Memorial hall upon the subject,
"The Future Plans and Policies of
the University."
Dr. Ruthven welcomed this op-
portunity to acquaint the under-
graduates with a subject t h a t
should be of vital concern to them,
according to a statement of William
Kearns, '31, chairman of the Open
forum committee of the Student
Chrilstian association.
Future Alumni Will Know Aims.
As potential alumni the student
body should at least have a rudi-
mentary knowledge of what the
leaders of the institution have in
mind for its future betterment.
The forum that was scheduled
for last Thursday at which Dr.
Frederick B. Fisher, pastor of the
Methodist-Episcopal church of Ann
Arbor and former Bishop of Indi'a,
was to speak on "The College Atti-
tude toward Religion" has b e e n
postponed until Tuesday, Nov. 18. It
was decided that the last Thursday
afternoon was undesirable owing to
the conflict with the send-off of the
football team.
Riseman To Talk Nov. 20.
Harry Riseman, well known De-
troit attorney, will address the for-
um on Thursday, Nov. 20, on the
subject of "Unemployment Insur-
ance." This talk has been arranged
to follow up the forum last month
at which Abraham Epstein discuss-
ed "Social Insurance vs. Private In-
surance."
RADIO TODAY
Prof. Herbert O. Calvery, of
the chemistry department, will
discuss the occurrence of some
metals in foods and their possi-
ble significance in nutrition at
2 o'clock today from the Uni-
versity studio. Sidney Straight,
tenor, will present the musical
program.

Builders of the "Ente," freak German plane (below) say it is tailspin proof. In flight (above) it appears
to be cruising backward.

Girls" with Fi Dorsay-
Prof. Jackson R. Sharman, of the Wuerth-"So Long Letty" wx'h'
School of Education, has been in- Charlotte Greenwood.
vited by President Hoover to at-
tend the "White House Conference I Organizations.
on Child Health and Protecion,' Fo'clock tonight i roomMet a 3,
to be held from Nov. 19 to 22, in Natural Science building.I
Washington. American society of Che .n cal
"This conference has been called Engineers--Me'ting at 6:30 o clockJ
by the President," Professor S Ear- tonight in the Union building.
man said, "in order that the arny Faculty Women's club - Garden
facts that are known relative to section meeting at 3 o'clock thisj
this subject may be brought to- afternoon.
gether to be published and used." Sigma Rho Tau--Debate at 7:15
The conference will be aivided o'clock tonight in room 307, West
into four groups, medical service, Engineering building.I
public health service and adminis-_---
tration, education and training,
and service for the handicapped. -
Each of these groups are sub- T e W O
divided into smaller groups' and T
these are again divided. ON THE
Professor Sharman has been MIAMI BEAC
named chairman of a physical edu-
cation group of "The School Child,"CSTM
under the head of education andCH STM
training. He is also a member of (.
the recreation and physical educa- IS PLA
tion committee which is under the
same head.
Prof. Stuart A. Courtis, of the
School of Education, is also plan- IOse this vacation
ning to attend the conference. relaxation from th
Dean James E. Edmonson, of the
School of Education, has been in- *6. ENJOY YOUR FAVOR
vited to attend but he will not be
able to do so. -GOLF 'i SWIMMING;
It is estimated that about 1,100
persons will be present at the con- EUROPEAN PLAN'
ference. and evety appointment for'
------Write or wire for rate
UNIVERSITY OF MINNESOTA- JOHN B. WOFF
Twenty-two students in the college
of engineer'zg and architectures-
here were awarded keys for their
work in intramural sports during
1929-30.

An open forum discussion will fol-
low the talk by Professor Condliffe,
as it is the purpose of the forum
first to arouse controversy by hav-
ing the speaker present his views in
a formal talk and then to give the
audience ample freedom to questi'on
the speaker and make him discuss
controversial points.
The forum is open to residents of
Ann Arbor as well as students and
faculty of the University,
BEACH
H, FLORIDA
.Y IMEV
RIDA.
period for a real
he grind of study)
/TE OUTDOOR SPORT,
r BOATING 'FISHING
MODERATE RATES .
your comfort and pleasure
es and reservationss
ORD, Manuger

(By Associaiced Press)
BERLIN.-Reversing the course of
airplane design, the new Focke-Wuli
"Ente" monoplane here makes many
a sidewalk stroller rub his eyes in
amazement as he sees a passenger
ship apparently cruising backward
through the city's upper air.
Its silhouette in flight suggests
one of the many high-wing passen-
ger monoplanes, but where the or-
dinary single-engine monoplane us-
ually carries its propellor the "Ente"
carries a rudder and vertical stabil-
izer .
And instead of flying with its
elongated fuselage in the rear, it
seems to be pushing its fuselage
through the air tail-first.
Only when it is taxiing along the
ground at some distance from the
observer does the freak plane's de-

sign begin to look reasonable.
At such a moment it ceases to
look like a monoplane going back-
ward and suggests instead a great
gray duck running along with wings
outspread and outstretched neck
skimming the grasstops with its
bill as if looking for appetiz:ng in-
sects.
It has these advantages:
It cannot "nose over" on landing,
as the longest and lightest part of
its fuselage is in front of its en-
gines, making the plane's center of
gravity several yards behind the
front wheel of the landing gear.
It is tailspiin-proof. The forward
stabilizer, which is really a forward
wing, is set at a sharper angle than
the main wing and tends to correct
at once, : ccording to the builders,
any tendency to enter a spin.

Because there is no danger of
"nosi'ng over" it is possible to halt
the .plane after landing with the
same suddenness as if it were an
automobile. It can land on very
small fields, a few yards from the
nearest obstruction. The pilot need
not worry . He may skid, just as in
an automobile, if he jams on the
brake too hard, but he can be sure
he won't nose over.
The "Ente" has a maximum speed
of 90 miles an hour and can climb
to 3,000 feet ih eight minutes. Driv-
en by two 100 horsepower enginesa
carried beneath the main wing, the
plane has room in its cabin for
three passengers. The pilot sits in
an open cockpit forward of the
cabin.j

ANN ARBOR NEWS-BRIEFS

--- _ _ - -- -_. __._

UniverS lty

of

h
41

S i g m a Chi Fraternity
I IV
House Damaged by Fire,
Smouldering in a coal bin for
three days before it was discovered,
fire broke out in the basement of
the Sigma Chi fraternity house at
548 S. State street at 11:15 o'clock
yesterday morning and burned its

men were able to bring it under
control. Damage of about $2,000 is
covered by insurance.
Nearly all the members of the
house were present when E. W.
Gentz, 32E, discovered that flames
were creeping up through the walls.
According to reports, a new auto-
matic stoker, recently installed, was
the cause of the fire,

Ask
O ra"o, 16011bb %wili
Presents

II! ___________________________________________________________________________________ - - -----------. -~iiiiI

Gilb r

'

VON
b A

THE OF CIAL
For 193-3
Wv ill Be Placed onf
SVw-ale on the Ca pus

England's Supreme Literary enius
IN
The ge ol yrao
"A pronounced optimist against the relentless flow of
everything that is pessimistic and depressing ormae
us regret life. His messages of good cheer and inspira-
tion have done much to hearten the world."
HILAUDITORIUM 4 '
atur ay IgI t:0

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