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November 09, 1930 - Image 1

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-09

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ESTABLISHED
1890

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MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

VOL. XLI. No. 37 EIGHT PAGES ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 9, 1930

PRICE FIVE CENTS

00

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WILDCATS, PURDUE
WIN: STAY IN RACE
FOR BIG TEN TITLE
Irish Down Pennsylvania, 60-20
in One Sided Grid Battle
at Philadelphia.
INDIANS BOW TO PURPLE

EXPEDITION HEAD
WILL SPEAK HERE

CHECK CONTESTED
ELECTION RETURNS

SCORES ON PASS
TO BEAT CRIMSON

Determine to, Fight
for Majority

to Last Vote
Control

in Congress.
G.O.P. LEADS IN

HOUSE

Bolierroakers Defeat Maroons
to, Show Great Strength
by Score of 26-7.
Northwestern and Purdue, two of
the leading contcnlers for the
Western Conference football cham-
pionship. both had ealsy times in
taking over their opponents yester-
day in the race for Big rTen hono s.
The strong Wildcat team won their
fourth straight ga)me. of the regular!
schedule, and now have won one
more game than Michigan's unde-
feated Wolverine: Purdue follows
closely on the heels of the leaders,
with only one reverse, at the hands
of Michigan, in her five Conference
games.
Wildcats 13how Strength.
(By Asse 3at-Fr5s.)
BLOOMINGTON, Ind., Nov. 8.-
Northwestern's powerful football
eleven swept aside Indiana, 25 to 0,
in its dash toward a Western Con-
ference championship b e f o r e a
home-coming crowd of 15,000 here
BIG TEN STANDINGS.

Rear-Admiral Richard E. Byrd,
Distinguished explorer, who will
talk at 8:15 o'clock tomorrow night
in Hill auditorium on his recent
expedition to the South Pole. This
lecture is the first on the Oratorical
Association series.
BYRD-~WILL DICUS
TRIP TO ANTARCTIC

Remaining Session for Present
Legislative Body Will
Close Service.
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8. - United
in seeking a return of prosperity,
national party leaders returned to
the business today of trying to find
out who won congressional control
in Tuesday's biennial election.
Republicans and Democrats both
were determined to fight it out to
the last vote in the last precinct
and it was obvious tonight the act-
ual controlling party of the next
Senate and House probably will
not be determined until the closely
divided membership meets a year
hence.
Control Doubtful.
The final but unofficial returns
left the Republicans with a major-
ity of one in both the House and
Senate and the leaders were pre-
pared to seek control again on
these standings. It was entirely
possible that two or three votes in
one district might settle the whole
issue for the House.
But with the session such a long
way off, unless a special session is
called next spring, it' was agreed
on all sides that it is too early to
speculate. Party chieftains were
checking over recounts in more
than a score of closely contested
Houc e lections_

Team
MICHIGAN.....0
Northwestern ..01.00
Purdue ........ . 1.0
Wisconsin ...... . 1
Mnnesota...... . 10.0
Ohio State ..... . 2.1
Iewa. ........ .0
Chicago ......... 2
Inidiana ....... 30..0
Illinois ........ 3000

W
3
4
1
1
1
0
0
0

L
0
0
i
i
i
i
2
3
3

T
a
a
a
a
1
n
a
a
a

Pct.
1.000
1.000
.800
.500
.500
.333
.000
.000
.000
.000 I

Famous
in

Explorer Will Lecture
Hill Auditorium.

Tomorrow Night.
FILMS WILL BE SHOWN

today. The Wildcats, their appetite
for victory whetted by the memory
of Indiana upset victories of the
past three years, presented irre-
sistible strength in the line and a
deceptive passing attack.
Score by periods:
Northwestern .... 13 6 0 6-25
Indiana ..........0 0 0 0- 0

I

Maroons Surprise.
fI 8 A y ufso'il ed Ircs s)

i

CHICAGO, Nov. 8.-
Alonzo Stagg and his
cago Maroons threw
i.oned surprise party
Boilermakcrs today,
last long enough.
Purdue came back

Coach Amosj
luckless Chi-
an old-fash-
for Purdue's
but it didn't
in regulation

style and captured the game by the
customary one-sided margin of 26
to 7.
Purdue .........,..0 6 13 7-26
Chicago .......... 0 7. 0 0- 7
(f; A ssouil, s> I d A'r N
PHILADELPHIA, Nov. 8. - The
green-jerseyed footballtcyclone from
South Bend, rushing the colors of
Notie Dame toward another nation-
al championship, leveled the ram-
parts of the University of Pennsyl-
vania today with one of the greatest
scoring onslaughts ever witnessed
on an American college gridiron.
The final score was Notre Dame
69, Pennsylvania 20, nine touch-
downs to three.
Notre Dame......14 14 26 6 - 60
Penn ............ 0 7 6 7-20
POLICE ARREST 76
AS STUDENTS RIOT
Carnegie, Pitt Men Fight Police
in Pre-Game Demnonstration.
(; .sAsswiuat ed Press)
PITTSBURGH, Nov. 8. - Thirty-
nine Carnegie Tech and thirty-sev-
en University of Pittsburgh students
were under arrest today after mem-
bers of the student bodies of both
institutions had given police much
to worry about as a prelude to theI
annual Pitt-Carnegie football game
in Pitt stadium today.
The Pitt students ran afoul of the
law late Friday. The police thought
they had their hands full in curb-
ing the high spirits of the Panther
supporters, but the Pitt demonstra-
tion was as nothing compared with
the Carnegie students' celebration
early today.

Rear-Admiral Richard E. Byrd Will Pass Regulations.
will lecture at 8:15 o'clock tomor- Meanwhile, attention returned to
row night in Hill auditorium on his the approaching short session
which will wind up the business
trip to the South Pole. of the old Congress. Administration
This lecture is the first of a series leaders are preparing to concen-
sponsored by the Oratorical Asso- trate everything on the enactment
ciation. Admiral Byrd led an expe- of the vital appropriation measures
dition into the Antarct> regions, in order to make a special session
where a town was built, and stayed next spring unnecessary to dispose
there for a year and a half. During of them.
that time, valuable scientific explor- Unfinished business coming over
ations were made, and a great deal from the last session will get next
of geological and meteorological consideration, that includes the
data was gathered. By means of question of disposing of the Muscle
airplanes, new territory was dis- Shoals, Ala., power and nitrate
covered, a new mountain range was plant; regulations of motor bus
sighted, and many thousands of traffic; some prohibition measures;
miles were mapped. and unemployment bills.
Byrd will illustrate his lecture --------
with nine thousand feet of film, M'DONALD DENIES
none of which, except for that
showing the polar flight itself, ha SPLIT IN CABINET
been shown outside his lecture tour.I---
Byrd will appear in his new States Rumors of Division in
admiral's uniform, and will be ac -~
companied by his dog, "Igloo," who Government Are Untrue.
went with him on both of his polar (hi Assoriated Press)
trips. While in Ann Arbor, Byrd LONDON, Nov. 8.-Prime Minister
will be the guest of Prof. William MacDonald officiallysput his foot
H. H-obbs, of the geology depart- down today on reports that the
ment, who was instrumental in Laborite cabinet was split over cer-
bringing the explorer to Ann Arbor. tain features of proposed unem-
A few single tickets for the lee- ployment remedies.
ture may be obtained today at the Aystatement issued from No. 10
offices of the Association in room Downing street referred to the re-
3211 Angell hall. ported attitude of three cabinet
members toward suggestions in the
SUFFERS FROM FEVER. recent Liberal memorandum on un-
(I A .r s or tI '.-er employment and declared tha5t the
WHEELING, W. Va., Nov.8Rear idea that the cabinet was divided
Admiral Rihard E. Byrd continued on this issue was qui}e untrue.
his lecture tour today with a tem- Reports, which have been pub-
perature of 102 against the advice ! lished, mentioned Philip Snowden,
of physicians. He left here to keep chancellor of the exchequer, as de-
an engagement at Athens, 0., after cining to agree to developmentdof
having been attended by a physi- a loan to finance unemployment re-
cian last night, the polar explorer lief work and national reconstruc-
suffered from a cold. tion.

i

Roy Hudson,
Star Wolverine fullback, who re-
ceived Newman's pass to score the
winning touchdown in yesterday's
game against Harvard.
COMMISSION VAGUE
ON RUMATTITUDE
Forecast of Crime Group's Stand
on Liquor Is Declared
Purely Conjectural'.
DENIES PRESS REPORTS
(By Associated Press)
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8.-Any
forecast of what the- law enforce-
ment commiassion may recommend
in its forthcoming report on prohi-
bition were described by Chairman
Wickersham today as "purely con-
jectural."
At the same time he said the
commission had reached no con-
clusions which were ready for pub-!
lication and that it could 'not say
when the report will be submitted.
The revival of a rumor that the
commission would recommend a!
modification of the prohibition laws
to permit the sale of 2.75 beer today
caused a heavy increase in inquiries
made at the headquarters of the
commission,
Wickersham's statement was is-
sued at the close of the day but
previously Judge Kenneth Macin-
tosh, a commission member, had
described the report as a "guess."

PARTIES TO SPLIT
ON WET-DRY ISSUE,
CUNCANNON HOLDS
Political Scientist Prophesies
Republicans Will Uphold
Prohibition Cause.
CITES DRY MAJORITIES
Expects Revival of Business in
1932; Sees Roosevelt as
Hoover's Opponent.
Predicting that the Democratic
party in 1932 will take the wet, side
in the national battle, and that the
Republicans will defend the 18th
Amendment, Prof. Paul M. Cuncan-
non, of the political science depart-
ment, yesterday discussed the re-
sults of Tuesday's election over
Station WJR from the University
studio.
In Illinois and New York, he said,
the Republicans moved to theiwet
side and were gloriously trounced,
while in Pennsylvania they stood
by thei'r guns for the Prohibition
amendment, and in the face of a
terrific attack, were victorious.
Depression Aids Democrats.
Although the tide of the election
ran swiftly toward, the Democratic
party and toward the wets, there
is no reason to believe that the
Democrats will easily elect a Presi-
dent in 1932, and that the days of
prohibition are numbered, he said.
"The Republicans suffered in 1930
from the business. depression, and
from a certain impatience with the
President because he has failed to
display a vigorous political leader-
ship," he said. The possilbilities,
Professor Cuncannon stated, are
that business will pick up by 1932,
and that the President will realize
that in dealing with the next two
Congresses, he must vigorously lead
the way
It appears that manyrNovembers
will come and go before there is
any change in prohibition, he said,
pointing out that two-thirdshvote in
both houses of the Congress are
necessary to repeal the 18th amend-
inent, and that at present the drys
outnumber the wets in the House
more than two to one, and in the
Senate more than four to one.
Names Presidential Nominees.
President Hoover and Gov. Frank-
lin Roosevelt, of New York state,
wi1l probably oppose each other in
the presidentilal election in 1932,
with the odds slightly favoring the
President, Professor Cuncannon
predicted. He pointed out that "this
seems to be one of those rare peri-
ods in American politics when you
can predict with a fair degree of
accuracy the nominees of thertwo
rival parties two years in advance."
"A party, to win in American pol-
itics," he said, "must stand on its
record and this impltes re-nominat-
ing President Hoover for a second
term."
At the time of the next presiden-
tial election, Roosevelt will be 50
years of age, Professor Cuncannon
said. "Ie is a cousin of the late
president, and married a niece of
Theodore Roosevelt. A graduate of
Harvard, a resi'dent of rural New
York, a descendant of the old Amer-
ican stock, an able lawyer, and a
distinguished public servant to the
state and nation, he is a fit subject
for political honors," he concluded.
NATIONS REFUSE
TO LIMIT DRAFT

VARSITY STOPS TWO GOAL THREATS
By JOE RUSSELL
(Special to The Daily)
SOLDIER'S FIELD, CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 8.-Fired to
a fighting pitch by Barry Wood's well-placed drop-kick which gave
Harvard a three-point lead with the last quarter less than a minute
old, Michigan came back this afternoon with everything it had,
rushed the Crimson down the field and ended with Hudson racing
across the goal line after snaring one of Newman's passes to give the
Kipkemen a 6-3 victory.
The Harvard lead was extremely short-lived, Michigan scoring
Nvithin five minutes after their opponents had had their moment of
hope. Lajeunesse kicked off to Huguley after Wood's score, but then
Michigan held and Harvard punted on the Maize and Blue 33-yard
line. From that moment until the
ball was behind the goal posts the
TEAM WILL ARRIVE. Wolverines were a fighting band
Michigan's victorious football which could not be denied. On
team will arrive from Cambridge
at 2:40 o'clock this afternoon at the sixth play Newman standing
the Michigan Central railroad on Harvard's 40-yard line, passed
depot. to Hudson who took the ball on
a dead run on the Crimson's 15-
yard line and eluded two would-
DPbe tacklers on his way to the
touchdown.
Complete Long Pass.
CR In this march down the field
Michigan made three first downs on
four plays, Wheeler carrying the
ball twice for a total of 14 yards,
Educators Developing New Plan Newman taking it
to Make Knowledge Basis twice for 11 yards
of Credit.I crashing through
for five. On the
CITE LATIN AS EXAMPLE next play Wheel-
er was stopped for
(By A oIiatd Dv el)-no gain, and itt
WASHINGTON, Nov. 8.-Develop- looked as though
ment of a new system of standard- the Wolverine ad-
ized tests for college students which vance had been
m a y revolutionize methods of stopped on t h e
higher education, has been under- oppone nt's 30-
taken by the American council of yard line. New-
educaionman called for a
Working with a grant of $500,000 pass, and r g Newman
from the Rockefeller foundationpas' and running emn
' back to the 40-yard stripe, tossed
the council plans to evolve a sys- straight to Hudson. Newman's at-
tern which will make students' ad- tempt for the extra point was wide
vancement in college dependent on of its mark, leaving the invaders
actual achievements in learning with a three-point lead and the
rather than in spending a certain game.
time, such as semesters in study. Attempt Three Drop-icks.
It is proposed to construct a Harvard was close enough to the
graduated series of standard knowl- Michigan goal to attempt drop-
edge tests for every subject con- kicks three tiies in the last half,
monly studied in colleges. At pres- but Wood could make good only one
ent the fundamental basis is "hours of these. Two weo in the third
of credit." quarter, after the Crimson had ad-
Freshman Latin, for example, vanced the ball within a striking
now counts six semester hours for distanceof the Michigan a be-
the minimum requirements. Under fore the Maize and Blue defense
the new system it might count stiffened and held for three downs.
twice as much in the way of credit Trhe first try from the field was
for the good student as for the blocked by Lajeunesse, Michigan
poor student, guard, while the second rolled along
Under the present system each the ground. The home team clearly
instructor in each college makes' outplayed the invaders during this
up and marks his own examina- quarter, the period ending with the
tions. ball on Michigan's 14-yard line,
after a long pass from Wood to
Radio Report of Game Huguley had been good for 40 yards
Heard by 800 at Union and had brought the oval to Michi-
______gan's 10-yard line. Here, however,
the Wolves stiffened for three downs
More than 800 students listened and Wood dropped back and booted
to the play-by-play account of the the ball between the uprights for
Michigan-Harvard game yesterday the first score of the game.
as it was received by the five radios With victory seemi'ngly in sight,
in the Union building. This is the the Hrvard stands went wild, but
their joy did not last long with
largest crowd yet to make use of Michigan shattered their opponents'
the facilities provided by the Union defense directly after that for their
for listening to the broadcast ac- touchdown.
counts of the out-of-town football o

I
I
i
3
l
I

Wolverines Rush
Way to Triumph
inFinal Quarter
Hudson Snares Newman's Toss to Cross Line,

Overcoming
During

Harvard's Lead
Final Period.

i
h

Dust of Tradition,
Goalposts Baffle
Cambridge Visitor
By P. M,
(SpecialFa T he hau/v
CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 8.-
Flushed with pride at having
smuggled one copy of "Strange
Interlude" and one copy of
"Jurgen"into the easily shocked
home of the bean and the cod,
we arrived here this morning
with blood in our eyes and
the above mentioned volumes
sewed in the lining of our coat.
We discovered almost instantly
that Harvard is conveniently
situated 800 miles from Ann Ar-
bor and near the subway. The
campus contains several build-
ings which are two centuries old
and look it and a number of
shiny, new dormitories. The
whole place is lousy with cul-
ture, and we shall be combing
the dust of tradition out of our
beard for weeks to come.
Crimson rooters have an un-
altruistic view-point on the
matter of goal posts. Attempts
on the part of certain deep
thinkers in the Michigan con-
tingent to capture them after
the game resulted in a tie. One
was torn down and dragged
away, but Boston police arrived
in time to rescue the other tem-
porarily at least.
And we discovered something

Ii

MICHIGAN ENTHUSIASM GAINS FORCE
AT ALUMNI DINNER PRECEDING GAME
Ruthven Addresses Graduates S. Allen of Massachusetts and Rob-
of University at Sixth ert F. Thompson, '92L.
Fielding H. Yost, director of ath-
iona anque letics, and Harry Kipke, varsity
football coach, gave short talks. a
« (SPeeroI to The IDailv)
BOSTON, Nov. 8.-Michigan's en- President Ruthven, in his address,
thusiasm on the eve of the Harvard commented upon the loss of profes-
game received great impetus here sors at the University and thanked
last night when 1000 of the Univer- the New York alumni club for its
sity's alumni gathered at the Som- aid in securing men for the faculty.
erset hotel for the si'xth national He touched upon faculty pensions,
alumni dinner, given under the University research projects, a n d
sponsorship of the Michigan club the administrative organization of
of New England. the University.
President Alexander Grant Ruth- I The present admittance stan-

Preparatory Commission Vetoes
German Proposal.
(By Associated Press)
GENEVA, Nov. 8.-The prepara-
tory commission on disarmament
today rejected by 12 votes to 6 a
German attempt to incorporate
the principle of limitation of the
annual contingent of conscripts
called to service into the projected
Sdraftdisarmament treaty.
American and British represen-
tatives on the preparatory com-
mission abstained from voting.
Germany, China, Russia, Norway,
Sweden and Holland supported the
proposed limitation. France, Italy,
Japan and other nations which re-
ly upon compulsory military serv-

games.
OTHER
(By Asso
Army 13, Illin
Ohio State 27,
Minnesota 59,
Wisconsin 58,
0.
Marquette 7, I
Fordham 13, D
Yale 66, Alfre
Southern Calif
nia 0.
Pitt 7, Carneg
Cohrnell 5 4.Ho

passing barrage failed to material-
ize, the Wolverines completing but
SCORES two tosses out of
SCOEd res),ixattemots but
wiated Press) z oth of these were
as 0. long and one re-
Navy 0. U - sulted in a score.
South Dakota State This keeps Michi-
gans re c or d of
havngevery
owa 0. hY' ngev
ow 0.touchdown t h is
Detroit 7. year the direct or
d 0. -ndirect result of
fornia 74, Califor- rpassintact.
Mlichigan gained
ie Tech 6. 32 yards by thhese
bas 0.----

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