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November 05, 1930 - Image 6

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-05

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

PAGE SI:X -

THE MTCHICA

DAILY

WEDNESDAY. NOVEMBER 5, 1930

TH MC IG N DAL WDESA. OEME__,19~

'V'ARSITl
RETU FOR DRILL
Prepare for Aerial Attack by
Barry Wood; Cornwell
Stars in Line.
HOZER REMANS AT END
Drilling with more attention to
the finer details, the Wolverine
Varsity yesterday went through
some of the most intense practice
of the season in an attempt to per-
feet a defense that will stop the
Crimson backs. Coach Kipke work-
ed with two complete teams and
seems to have developed a system
to use against the Harvard aerial
attack.
The entire squact was in uniform
and indications that they are in
shape were in evidence when all of
the.men who have been on the
cripple list appeared in the scrim-
mage against the freshmen. Coach
Fisher's yearlings lined up against
the Wolves early in the session with
all of the Harvard plays that they
have been drilling on for the past
week and loosed a strong aerial
attack.
Stop Lateral Passes.
C e nte ring
. round the later-
3d passes and long
nd sweeps, the
igan grid-
ers have devel-
ped a complete
overing of the
field and seem to
,eprepared. for
h e offense of
Vood and Mays.
?e t e Cornwell
and Doc Morrison
took most of the tackles when the
freshmen opened up a plunging
game using the Crimson forma-
tions. Cornwell showed up to the
best advantage by breaking through
the linebseveral times to stop plays
in the backfield.
Kipke spent some time on the de-
fense against the famous Harvard
lateral and with few exceptions the
pass was either smothered or inter-
cepted. Short forward passes also
lost their effectiveness as Morrison
and Hudson covered the short pos-
ition behind the line.
Auer Returns.
Auer again appeared in the line-
up and although he wears a heavy
bandage over his ear, it is expected
that he will stad against the East-
erners, while Hozer retains his new
po:ition at end. Williamson also
took the wing assignment and
Draveling has shifted in to tackle.
Simrall played the entire period
and his tackling proves that he has
completely recovered from his in-
jury received in the Illinois game.

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THESE M 1N A!)D N 7A'S CAUJSE

IN TITAN UPSET

.
- -

JU FJS RAT1E~VARSITY CENTER
~ACAI STFRESHMEh
Coach Courtright Points Squad'
to Tilt With General
Motors Tech.

TrianguL
Saturd
Le&
AUSTIN

I

ANDql IINIS

ar Meet at Urbana This
lay Will be Run Over
ss Difficult Course.
N FAVORED TO WIN

SUBS SEEK POSITIONS
Dummy scrimmage against a
group of second- string freshmen
was the order of the day for Coach
Courtright's Wolverine 'B' team
yesterday. After a week's letup in
which the squad has been taking
things easy, this week's drills have
taken on a more serious air in pre-
paration for Saturday's contest with
the team from General Motors
Tech to be played at Ferry Fiia.
Work on Offense.
Coach Fisher sent over a group
of yearlings yesterday to form the
defense against the plays of the
Jayvees. Courtright is working
with practically the entire squad
with a possibility that the starting
lineup Saturday may be altered
from that which went in against
j the Illini Junior Varsity two weeks

I

'De" MJorrison
Center f the Michigan eleven,
who wil be oposed to Ben Tick-
nor, Harvard's all-American pivot
man, when the Wolverines meet
Harvard in their intersectional
football game at Cambridge this
coming Saturday.
PURPLE PREPARES
TO MEET INDIANA

Three of the members of the University of Iowa team that d
trogany, end, Jim Willer, halfback, and Jerome Kriz, fu Iback, all
Hawkcyes' games so far. Kriz alternates with Sansen at fullback
in reserve until his speed may be utilized against a weary opponen
I-,
.di Chatter

"ri}75C e 1.. _ . " <;
:v."..

By JOE RUSSELL.
From 1879 until the present the
sons of Old John Harvard and
Michigan have met on the gridiron
but five times, and in these five
games the easterners have emerg-
ed victorious from four of them.
Harvard is one of the very few
teams which has won from the
Wolverines more times than they
have lost.
When football was only threej
years old here in Ann Arbor in
1881 a Wolverine team journey-
ed to Cambridge to do batale
with the Crimson, and cam
home smiartn~g under a u 1
beating. in this same yezr
"SM 'Three" sebouls arid lest,
every game; lale v a rcd "q,
Princeton 13-1, and Yale 11-0.
In 1882 no games were sched-
uled, so it was not until the
next year that Michigan and
Harvard again tangled.
Once again the Cambridge eleven

took the Maize and Blue o
road, but this time to thet
3-0. From this time unt
football relations between t
schools were concluded, but
year the teams waged anI
battletagain in the east, an
again the Crimson won, 4-
From this time until
there was another lapse
the 1914 ame ws in, wh
stili taiked about on the (
s'Un cag~e TNe se n
the g oal ine is the 7-0I
the oldiant ghci tha J
cy s.auLa . e. or M
Aan gri an ks t ias.
(Coin he yardo nae7.
In Carried the bail, but
the goal hie was within
he could not carry the b~
cress.
Michi gan. out-played H
(Continued on Page 7

ago.
S.As yet, however, the outstanding Northwestern to Seek Revenge
efeated Detroit last week, 7 to 3. Gus Mas- men seem to be the regulars that for Previous Beatings.
have been much in evidence in all of the have been doing duty most of the
k, while Wilier is a speedy man who is held season. Backfield combinations are (By Associated Press)
k,. hsCourtright's worry, with a goodly CHICAGO, Nov. 4.-Indiana's well-
it. supply of available material, but mauled Hoosiers need expect no
the lack of a combination that can mercy from Northwestern when
Y--+YEARLINGS MEET work with the greatest precision they meet at Bloomington Satur-
and effectiveness is yet to be day-
VARSITY ELEVENS found. Comparison of the season accom-
Kutsche, who does most of the plishments by the Wildcats and
Freshmen Use Harvard Plays passing, will undoubtedly be on the Hoosiers might indicate North-
_ _ __starting end of Michigan's heavies, western could regard the game asl
in Two Scrimmages, and Bremen, whose kicking has a breather, but Coach Dick Hanley
ver the IIwon games for his team, is assured never will feel that way about In-1
tune of The freshman grid squad was of a position in the backfield quar- diana again.
il 1895 divided into two teams for yester- tet. Lindsey, Coombe, Berkowitz, Three years in a row Northwest-
he two day's scrimmages with the Varsity Brown, and Markley are the re- ern was a topheavy favorite to
in this and "B" teams. The eleven which maining backs from which Court- whip Indiana and Northwestern
hitri ppsdIik' mnuedHrari ight has to choose. gottrelcigs in a row.
adstorc opposed Kipke's men used Harvrd g Winston's Leg Injured. Northwestern will have only one-
. o plays in its offensive attack in or- Justice and Bovard are the first half of the celebrated Rentner to
der to familiarize the Varsity with string ends and Jordan, Frisk and Baker forward passing combina-
1914 Crimson formations. Horwitz are fighting it out for tion Saturday. Rentner suffered an
C, but Iregular tackle berths. As yet it injury to his spine Saturday and
btIBoth yearling teams were of a- syti
ich is bout the same stemh as the ofir~ looks as though Benz and Parker will not be in action until the Wild-
3srin- t en weredidh as othlrs are slated for the guard positions. cats meet Notre Dame Nov. 22.
string men were divided an Winston, the regular cee,
xM r- two seuads, each of which was weln
-hdart inju ri bed lee; r theT p:st
for uppplied with reserve ren. week, but he is siovering and was imnal Reserv
_ Those yearli2s that did notI working out at the pivot poHL e
participate in the scrimmages v fre yesterday, althouigI it was evi t.
mbt- drilled on' a u-damen ais by the _that t injUtired limb was U Side D
Y u-oshman ceacles. Tm great ma- favored ___________________
reds, fority of the n 71ave not shown
time any considerable degree of m~ ~
when orovement in the essential factors
reach of the gane, such as tackling,
all a- blocking, and charging. The first
group of Fisher's men are showing
Iarvardsteady improvement, being one o"
the best yearling elevens ever seen
at Michigan.

Michigan's cross country squad is
putting on the final touches this
week during practice in preparation
for its first Conference race. The
opening meet for the Wolverines
will be the triangular race with
Ohio State and Illinois, to be run
at Urbana Saturday morning, the
gun sounding at 10:30 o'clock.
Michigan Favored.
This will be a five-mile run for
the Harriers, and in view of the
level course at Urbana which is
less difficult than the Michigan
hilly layout, the Maize and Blue
runners are expected to make a
good showing against their oppon-
ents. The men hope to take ad-
vantage of this and will put their
best into the race for the victory
that will do a great deal of good to
the team in the way of pepping
them up and giving them confi-
dence.
As the teams line up, Michigan
seems to have an edge over the
Buckeyes and Illini. State's star
harrier is Hanover, who is ithe only
one of three first place men in the
last meet that remains this year,
and Evans, who ran ninth last year
and captains the Indians this sea-
son, is Illinois' best man. The im-
provement that Austin has made
this fall, and the fact that he beat
Evans before, seem to line him up
as the favorite in Saturday's race.
Wolverines in Condition.
The balance of the Wolverines
are in good shape and have been
consistently turning in good times.
Coach Chuck Hoyt has already
picked out nine men to take with
him, all runners about whose com-
parative ability there is little doubt;
but there may be a couple more
that are good enough for the trip.
In order to settle this question,
there will be a five-mile test race
run off tonight with Darrow, Hayes,
(Continued on Page Seven.)

ations Today
ds $19.75 rd. trip
esk 12-6 p. m.

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