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November 04, 1930 - Image 1

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-11-04

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ESTABLISHED
1890

Abr

. t u

MEMBER
ASSOCIATED
PRESS

EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVE RSITY OF MICHIGAN

VOL. XLI. No. 32

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN,

TUESDAY, NOVEMBER 4, 1930

PRICE FIVE ENTS

SPECTACULAHR FIR
OF OUTLAW STOUT
OIL WELLSUBDUED
Conflagration Endangers Main
Oklahoma City Power Plant
and Burns Two Bridges.
CITY STILL THREATENEDl
Much Oil Escaped From Dykes
Covering Canadian River
With Three Inch Film.

GUSHER
AS,

SHOWERS OKLAHOMA CITY WITH OIL AND GAS IfIPL IP111IT1
EXPERTS ATTEMPT TO AVERT DREAD FIRE MENACE
SAT POLLS TODAY

Citizens
State

Will Decide
Issues Today

Close Race for Governorship
Expected Between Republican
and Democratic Candidates.

Reapportionment, Cigarette Tax,
Important Amendments.
Five proposed amendments to the
state constitution will be voted up-
on by the people of Michigan in
conjunction with the general state,
congressional, legislative, and coun-
ty elections today.
The proposals are concerned with
election of township officers, in-
crease of the homestead exemption
to three thousand dollars, authoriz-
ation of the state to improve or as-
sist in improving rivers and streams,
referendum on a proposed law to
impose a specific tax on the sale,

LEGAL INSTI F'UTE
REVISES STATE
JUDICIAL RULES

Completion of

Revision

PROHIBITION

IS ISSUE

Announced by Prof.
Sunderland.
WORK OF 3 YEARS

Democrats Expecting Support
of Groesbeck Contingent

(By Associated Press)
OKLAHOMA CITY, Nov. 3.-A
serpent of fire, fed by oil from the
now subdued outlaw Stout well, on
the outskirts of the city, was writ-
ing its way eastward down the
north Canadian river tonight. It
burned two bridges during the day
and menaced the Harrah power
plant from which Oklahoma City
gets most of its electric current.
Protect Bridges.
Shawnee firemen took measures
to protect from damage a concrete
bridge on the paved highway be-
tween Oklahoma City and Shaw-
nee, after the fire had destroyed
the Waner bridge, two miles west
of McCloud.
The first bridge destroyed was
near Spencer, a short distance
downstream from the scene of a
spectacular fire yesterday after-
noon. It was not known whether
the latest conflagration was a new
fire or a fresh outburst of yester-
day's spectacle.
The Stout well, harnessed yester-
day after flowing wild since Thurs-
day night, belched forth an esti-
mated 60,000 barrels of oil and
100,000,000 cubic feet of gas daily.
The quantity of oil being much too
great to be stemmed by the hasti-
ly thrown up earthen dikes, much
of it went into the river. In places
the oil coating on the water was
three inches thick.
Smoke Hides City.
Billowing black clouds of smoke
made a curtain on the eastern hor-
i4a.t. Irklalma City today.
Fear of :ire on the eastern side
of the city was not entirely remov-
ed, as houses, grass and trees, still
were saturated with the volatile
petroleum that sprayed the resi-
dential districts as far as two miles
north of the well.
Students to Lead
M.I.P.A. Discussion
Groups Announced
Leaders of discussion g r o u p s,
which will feature the 1930 meeting
of the Michigan Interscholastic
Press Association, gathered in the
Journalism library, West Medical
building, yesterday afternoon to as-
semble plans for the gathering
which convenes at the Union on
Dec. 11, 12, and 13.
Those selected for annuals dis-
cussion were George Dusenbury, '31,
Harry Benjamin, '32, Edward S. Mc-
Kay, '32, Stafford M. Hodder, '30,
Frederick Brace, '32, Jack Lenfesty,
'32, John Marshall, '32, Joseph
Gates, '32, and George Hofmeister,
'31.
Leaders of newspaper group as-
semblies are Henry Merry, '31, Rob-
ert Aldrich, '31, Robert Mansfield,
'31, Frank Cooper, '31,. Gurney Wil-
liams, '31, Sher M. Quraishi, '31,
Walter Wilds, '31, Adsit Stewart, '31,
Joseph Russell, '31, Richard L. To-
bin, '32, Hollister Mabley, '31, Thom-
as Davis, '32, Charles Kline, '32,
Richard Jung, '31, Cornelius Bueke-
ma, '31, Marvin Kobacker, '31, Har-
old Warren, '31, George Spater, '30,
Thomas Muir, '32, Robert McHenry,
'31, and John Canfield, '31.
Discussion leaders iln the maga-
zine section include Walter Holt,
'31, George Dusenbury, '31, Bruce
Palmer, '31, Harcourt Patterson, '32,
Paul Showers, '31, Gurney Williams,
'31, and John S. Marshall, '32.

- f s
Okiahoma City, menaced by the encroachment ot oil wvells, was showered with black clouds of oi when
No. 1 C. L. Stout was brought in. The gusher, shown hero spouting oil and gas, roared defiance as experts were
trying to control it. Only a few month ago the "Wild Mary" Sudick well caused a similar fire menace-
- "i?:i^:4}i__ "i:;-?iiiiii_:?__:__ __________-:______________________________

TAXIS FR~gBBN,
POLE GL OE

BRACE ANNOUNCESI
DIRECTORY DELAYI
Sale of Publication on Campus
to be Wednesday, Nov. 12."

Common Council Rules Against Delay in the compilation of the
Private Phone Stations faculty directory at the office of the
secretary of the University has
on City Extensions. made necessary the postponement
CAB MEN VOICE PROTEST of the publication of the 1930-31
Student Directory for one w e e k,
Reconsidering their decision of Fred F. Brace, '32, editor of the di-
October 21, the Common Council rectory, stated last night.
last night passed a resolution for- Although originally announced to
bidding taxicab companies to main- appear tomorrow, this issue will not
tain telephone call stations on poles be on sale on the campus until Wed-
erected on city-owned lawn exten- nesday, Nov. 12, Brace said
sions. Taxicab operators present at(. Due to a large number of errors
the last meeting stated that such I in the faculty directory for last
action would force them either to I year, the list for this year has been
move their call boxes withiln the lot Ithoroughly checked and verified by
lines or to withdraw from business the secretary of the University. ThisI
should the latter expedient fail to process caused the delay of more
be practical. than a week in the coinpletin of
Alderman C. C. Freeman acted as the list and resulted in the post-
president in the absence of presi- ponement of the appearance of the
dent Dean Myers at the regular ses- directory.
sion in city hall last night. It was This year's directory contains, in
ioinheabsceofpesienh. t Mwasaddition to the verified faculty list,
in the absence of president Myersa list of the students of the Univer-
and two other members of theiythirdrsssadelpn
council that the resolution enforc- sity, theitr addresses and telephone
ing he emoal ithi 15day ofnumbers with a special supplement
ing the removal within 15 days of for the students who were late in
all privately owned obstructions registering with the University. The
f rm c lawn exensions was book is bound in green.

t
.

passed.
Recommended by the water rates
commission last Tuesday t o t h e
Board of water commissioners, and
by the latter to the council, an in-
crease in water rates involving ap-
proximately $50,000 added city in-
come will add one-sixth to the pres-
ent minimum rate plus a 25c per
month service charge.
The budget committee was dele-;
gated to take action on a request
of the board of police commission-
ers for an increase of $800 to the.
police budget for the purpose of
purchasing and maintaining an
additional scout car, for use during
anticipated increased activity of the
lawless element during the coming
winter.
In a communication from Mayor
Edward W. Staebler the following
were nominated as additional elec-
tilon officers for the seventh ward:
Fred K. Foster, William J. Miller,
Frank J. Davidson.
Hempstead Has Lead
in Mimes Production
David B. Hempstead, '31, will play
the role of the Emperor in O'Neill's
"Emperor Jones" because of the in-
eligibility of W. Hathcock, '33, it was
announced last night.
The production opened last night
at the Lydia Mendelssohn theater.
Another play, Arthur Schnitzler's
ccn a - -I - 1 onn nr " r

RECORDING B A N D
TO PLAY AT BALL
First Union Formal of the Year
Will Feature Alabamians'.
Marion Hardy and his Alabami-
ans, Columbia recording orchestra
from Chicago, will be the feature of
the first annual Union formal ball,
to be held Friday evening in the
ballroom of the Union.
Eleven Negroes comprise the Ala-
bamians and come direct from the
Merry Garden cafe in Chicago. Be-
fore their engagement in Chicago,
they were featured at the El Tor-
reon club in Kansas City and at
the Boulevard de Paris night club
in St. Paul, Minn.
Late permission for women stu-
dents, allowing them to stay out
until 2:30 o'clock on the night of
the dance, is expected to be granted
by the Senate Committee on Stu-
dent Affairs at their meeting to-
day.
A special club breakfast will be
served in the taproom of the Union
after 12:15 o'clock on the night of
the dance and refreshments will be
served in the ballroom throughout
the entire affair. This is one of the
few occasions during the year when
women will be allowed in the tap-'
room..
This dance is one of the principal
items in the biggest year, socially,
of the Union, Albert F. Donohue,
'31, president of the Union, pointed
out yesterday. Attendance records
for all previous years have beenI
surpassed this year. Tickets for the
formal are on sale at the desk in
the main lobby of the Union.
Thompson Recovering
After Appendectomy
(By Associated Press>A) d
CHICAGO, Nov. 3. - Attending
physicians announced tonight that
whie Mavn William Hale Thomn-

ANN ARBOR GROCER
SHOT BY__BANDIT
Two Armed Robbers Rifle Till,
Then Shoot Local Merchant
When He Resists Them.
CONDITION NOT SERIOUS
Two armed hold-up men entered
the Lemble grocery store at 530
Forest ayenue shortly after seven
o'clock last night, emptied the cash
register, and then shot down Al-
phonse Lemble, proprietor of the
store, in making their escape.
Both men, who, according to po-
lice were drunk, carried revolvers as
they entered the store. They covered
Lemble and removed the cash,
amounting to about $15, according
to reports, from the till. As they
turned to go Lemble attacked one
of them, who opened fire, wounding
Lemble in the left arm. Police, who
immediately rushed to the store,
took Lemble to St. Joseph's Mercy
hospital, where doctors were unable
to tell at once whether or not his
condition was serious.
No trace of the bandits was found
by police, who said that powder
marks on Lemble's arms indicated
that he had been shot from close
range. Lemble, who retained con-
sciousness, told police that one of
the weapons used by the hold-up
men was a forty-five calibre revol-
ver, while the other was a small
pistol, probably a twenty-two cali-
bre gun.
Officials at State
Consider Grid Game
With Detroit Team
(By Associated Press)
LANSING, Nov. 3. - Michigan
State College officials and adminis-
trations authorities today private-
ly contemplated a proposal from
Governor Green that Michigan
State and the University of Detroit
meet in a football game at Ann Ar-
bor Thanksgiving Day for the bene-
fit of the unemployed.
Although the governor commun-
icated with Herman H. Halladay,
secretary of Michigan State col-
lege, officials at the institution
said that no official proposal for
the charity game had been made to
them. Halladay regarded the con-
versation asi non-official.
Opinion on the proper course for
Michigan State to take was unfav-
orable for the proposal as private
discussions were under way. It was
recalled that the one condition un-
der which Michigan State agreed
to play Detroit this year following
student rioting after the 1929 game
was that the battle be played here.
It is believed the administration
would be zealous of this stand.
Lurking in the background, too
was some resentment at the so-
called "passing of the buck" tc
Michigan State following Michi.
gan's refusal to meet Detroit in a
charity game. Too, Michigan Stat
has always been zealous of Michi-
gan's friendship and would not like
the appearance of engaging in any

in Today's Election. of cigarettes, and apportionment of
LA I , spe representatives and senators in the
(By Associated Press) state legislature.
LANSING NQv. 3. - In speeches Proposed amendment n u m be r
and statements Republican and three, dealing with the taxation of
Democratic leaders declared confi- the sale of cigarettes, if passed, will
dence as the state-wide election place a tax of one cent on each ten
campaign ended tonight. cigarettes or franctional part sold
Both Parties Confident. or otherwise distributed in Michi-
From Republican state head- gan. Violation of this act would, be
quarters came the prediction that 'considered a felony and would be
Jnot only will the normal party punished by a jail term of from one
majority prevail, but it will be en- to ten years. The administration of
arged. The Democrats countered the provisions of this act would be
with the prophecy that the Demo- the business of the secretary of
cratic vote will be swelled to vac- state, who would have the power to
torious proportions by the ballots examine the books of any cigarette
of Republicans who voted for Alex distributor for the purpose of de-
J. Groesbeck in the primary. termining whether or not the tax
Wayne county, which Groesbeck had been paid.
carried substantially in the prim-
ary, was claimed by the Democrats AlTl
beck votes they hope to garner and ini SS TEiSTIFIS
wihutqck'"ulifcagtion Thrr Wroes- 'i
bition were claimed to be winning I
fcos ok'S.beagestand oncrohitary9 -9 N
of state and prominent in Wayne 0 _N U R
county Republican politics, brought
word to the capital, however, that Frenchman Describes Dirigible+
Brucker "ought to carry Wayne Accident Before London
by 50,000 at least." He said the wet IvsiainBad
and dry issue had injected some Investigation Board.
degree of uncertainty.
Both Count Genesee, Kent. I GIVES GRAPHIC ACCOUNT
Assurance was received at the
executive offices here from Repub- (By Associated Press)
lican workers in Flint that Gene- LONDON, Nov. 3.-The only man
see county is safefortthe party who saw the tragic end of the dir-
ticket. Democratic headquarters igible R-101 sat in the witness
contended, on the other hand, that chair today and told in halting
Comstock will carry the county. English how the big ship came at
From Kent county came further him out of the night careening at
conflicting claims. Frank D. McKay, a crazy angle before she crashed
state treasurer, and active in Kent into the hillside near Beauvais and
county politics, saidBruckerwill burst into fames which took 48
capture the county by more thanbusinofaewhc tok4
the usual Republican majority. lives.
Democratic organizers insisted the Alfred Rabouille had never been
vote will be close with Comstock away from Beauvais since his
having the edge. childhood before they brought him
to London to tell his story.
ROAD COMMISSION The dirigible,,he said, seemed to
E MM PAy be tilted at a sharp angle and
SETS MIINIMUM PAY headed downward when he first

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saw her.. Her lights flashed on and

Sufficient Money to Live on off twice. When the big ship L
to be Paid to Road Workers. struck the hillside, there was a loud d
explosion, a burst of flame, and o
(By Associated Press) Rabouille found himself on hisd
LANSING, Nov. 3. - Believing back in the underbrush.
some contractors are taking ad- 'Then she bounced and seemed
vantage of unemployment, a mini- to go up in the air," he said. "She
mum wage for labor on state high- fell and that was the end of her.'
way projects was ordered today by Five other witnesses across from
Governor Green and members of France also told of the few minutes
the administrative board of the which preceded the crash, although
highway committee. none of them actually saw the dir-
igible strike. They agreed that the
Grover C. Dillman, state highway ship seemed to be having trouble
commissioner, reported some con-msh i tue n
tractors are employing men at 20 maitaining altitude.1
and 25 cents an hour. He declared S
this is not a living wage. Governor Crimson Gets Shakeup i
Green asserted the state must take After Saturday's Tie
the lead in setting an example. _____
"The state cannot afford to pay (By Associated Press)1
men less than a living wage," the CAMBRIDGE, Mass., Nov. 3. -1
governor said. "We will recover Still surprised at the tie with Wil-
from the present depressed busi- liam and Mary, Coach Arnold Hor-
ness conditions more rapidly by ween shook up his Harvard team
giving those employed on state today. Eddie Mays was the onlyl
construction work decent remuner- back who kept his post while the
ation. In all highway contracts line also went through several
awarded from now on it will be changes. Fundamental work and a1
stipulated that the .contractors hard scrimmage against a fresh-
must pay at least 35 cents an ( man eleven constituted today's
hour." I(drill.
CARA VAN OF LOCAL GRIDIRON FANS
TO TREK EAST FOR HARVARD FRA Y'
Travel Modes Will be Unique; ( decked out in Michigan flags and
Many Events Scheduled. colors calculated to rouse the
____ peaceful inhabitants of Ontario. An
attempt is also being made to use
Looming large on the campus the new international tunnel for
football and social horizon is Mich- either the going or return trip from
igan's intersectional football clash Harvard, it was stated. Numerous
with Harvard at Cambridge this reservations were reported for both
week-end when a goodly share of these specials and the two trains.
the latter to pick up groups of
the student body is expected to re- alumni in Detroit and enroute.
verse Horace Greeley's advice and Although considerable very im-
go east. Headed by the varsity promptu entertainment is expect-
and band, the local contingent is ed to hold sway in Boston and
expected to overwhelm the aristo- Cambridge, the formally scheduE
crat of American cities-although events for Friday night include thy:
severe measures are reported to National Alumni dinner at which
have been taken by both the Bos- the University band will play and
ton police and Massachusetts state to which students are invited. Sat-
'militia to prevent the importation .urday morning several of the spe-

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S.

im At Simplification
of Procedure in
Court Practice.
The Legal Research Institute of
he Law School complted recently
revised system of court rules for
he State of Michigan, which has,
s its ultimate aim, the simplifica-
ion of legal procedure in this state,
was announced yesterday by Prof.
dson R. Sunderland, secretary of
he Commission established for that
urpose.
Court Accepts Revisions.
"The new rules constitute the
nost extensive revision of court
ractice ever undertaken in Michi-
an," stated Professor Sunderland.
Almost all of the reforms suggest-
d by the Michigan Procedure Cor-
nission were finally adopted by the
tate Supreme Court. As a result
ichigan will now have what is
robably the simplest and most con-
'enient system of court procedure
o be found in the United States,"
oncluded Professor Sunderland.
The complete history of the com-
nission, and the changes which it
ecommended and which were ac-
opted were drawn up in a report
end reads as follows:
ew Court Rules Drafted and Pub-
lished by the Legal Research In-
stitute of the Law School.
In 1927, the Legislature of Mich-
gan, by Act No. 37, of the Publc
cts-of l a cresLa -
nission of five attorneys-at-law of
he state, to confer with the Justices
f the Supreme Court and to sug-
est to that court revised rules of
iractice and procedue i .i n C ch
ourt and in all ohe rcourts of
ecord and a simplified method of
ppellate procedure. Te Governor
f the State appointed the following
awyers as members of the Commis-
ion,-Alexis C. Angell, of Detroit,
Alva M. Cummins, of Lansing, John
VI. Dunham, of Grand Rapids, Irvin
ong, of Detroit and Edson R. Sun-
derland, of Ann Arbor, and it was
rganized as the Michigan Proce-
lure Commission, with Alva M.
(Continued on Page g)
Professor Morris
to Speak on Radio
Program Tomorrow
Prof. Amos R. Morris, of the
English department, will speak to-
morrow afternoon during the Mich-
igan University of the Air program
on "How Do I Say It?"
Prof. John H. Muyskens, of the
phonetics department, will discuss
some phase of the cure and pre-
vention of minor speech defects,
on the Wednesday afternoon pro-
gram. Sidney Straight, tenor, will
be the vocal soloist.
The program Thursday will fea-
ture a talk by Dr. Donald King, of
the surgery department and a
member of ,the staff of the Uni-
versity hospital, whose subject will
be "Broken Bones." The Midnite
Sons quartet will furnish the mu-
sical numbers on the program.
Three faculty talks will mark the
Saturday night program. Prof.
Howard B. Lewis, of the chemistry
department, will discuss "Dr. Bea-
mont." Prof. Paul M. Cuncannon,
of the political science department,
is scheduled to talk on 'The Amer-
ican Elections of 1930," the results
of which are usually used to fore-
cast political trend throughout the
nation.
Other States to Vote
on Unusual Statutes
(By Associated Press)
Massachusetts voters will decide
tomorow whether to forbid the use

of the so-called steel trap in cap-
turing fur-bearing animals.
The citizens of Arkansas will
ballot on whether to require that
the Bible be read each day in statu

____-'"Episode" was also presented. There1
Managers Club Elects will be three more performances,
one tonight, one tomorrow night,
Minor Sport Leaders and the last one Thursday night.
Election of minor sport managers Gunmen Shoot Patient
featured the first meeting of the t ital
year of the major "M" Managers ____sp
club yesterday afternoon. S. Cad- (BEWAi s t.-TPress)
well Swanson, '31, was chosen presi-g NEWARK, N. Y., Nov. 3.-Two
dent of the club at the meeting gunmen tonight entered- Newark
General hospital and shot to death
while Douglas Miller, '31, was select- a patient who had given his name
ed recording secretary. to hospital authorities as Joseph
Malcolm Hume, '31, will manage Caruso.
the Varsity tennis team next spring. The men walked past an infor-
_ na~r, nn oh while an attendant

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