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October 28, 1930 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-28

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TUESDAY. OCTOBER 28. 1930

THE. MICHGA N DAILY

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MICHIGAN ALUMNAE
TO HRAIE515OOOD
SCHOLARSHIP FN
Miss Marguerite Chapin Plans
Campaign to be Completed
Before 1937.
WILL USE INCOME ONLY
Senior and Graduate Women to
Receive Fellowships and
Scholarships.
As part of a ten year program of
the University of Michigan Alum-
ni, the women from all groups in
the country are planning to raise
$150,000 before 1937, which is to be'
used for scholarships and fellow-
ships. Miss Marguerite Chapin,
executive secretary of the Alumnae
council of the Alumni association,
whose official duties begin Novem-
ber 1, is in Ann Arbor at the pres-
ent time planning the method of
the campaign.
Individual Gifts for Graduates.
Only the income of the amount
to be raised will be used. The in-
dividual gifts are for graduates and
senior women and are $1,500 each.
In addition to the scholarship fund
the Alumnae are planning to raise
a current capital to be given as in-
dividual fellowships every year.'
These gifts are $750 apiece and
will be given in a very short time.,
Requirements to be Announced.
Women eligible for the fellowships
are divided into two classes; women
who have graduated from other;
Universities of the country and de-
sire to take up further work at the
University of Michigan, and grad-
uates of this school who will pur-
sue their studies either here or in
any University in the United States
or abroad. Requirements for the
awards offered will be announced
at a later date when all plans are
completed for the campaign.
Miss Chapin who will be in Ann
Arbor Mondays and Tuesdays,
graduated in the class of 1920. While
in school she was president of the1
Women's League, and later was as-I
sistant to Dean Myra B. Jordan.
ATHENA MEMBERS'
TD HOLDMEETING
Both old and new members arec
invited to a meetng of the Athena1
literary society, Michigan chapter,
to be held tonight in the Alumnae
room of the Women's League build-.1
ing. Following a short business
meeting there will be a program
and refreshments.1
Margery Kirk, '32, will give two
piano solos, and Ruth Morrison,
'32, will entertain with a short !
dramatic reading. Madelon Andrus,
'31, is in charge of all plans for the
evening.
Two Play Committees
Named by Chairmen
Members of two more Junior
Girls' Play committees have been
appointed by Ivalita Glascock,
chairman of properties, and Kath-
erine Koch, chairman of programs.
The first two which were announc-
ed were the assistant chairman's
and the music and lyrics commit-
tees."
Harriet Adams, Louise Hincz, Ed-
wina Jenney, Martha King, and

Harriet Townsend will be the mem-
bers of the properties committee.
The program committee will be
composed of Agnes Graham, assist-
ant chairman, Miriam Highly, Vir-
ginia Ladd, and Lois McGuire.
Alumnae to Hold Ball
Every New Year's Eve
Alumnae of the University of
Michigan, as part of their newly
formed organization and program,
are planning to give a New Year's
ball in the ballroom of the Women's
League. Cards, dancing and re-
freshments are under the chair-
menship of Mrs. Homer Heath. This
is the first of a series of annual
New Year's Eve dances that the
Alumnae group will give.

GORDON STRING QUARTET TO PLAY
AT LYDIA MENDELSSOHN THEATREj

|1 fTIP (\1 |( T OPPORTUNITY FOR SOCIAL SERVICE
S\Il WORK IS INCREASED BY DEPRESSION

"SocialService offers an excell- I sent de
6MEMD enteopportunity to those who are Michiga
interested, for our present econo- men, D
Zeta Phi Eta Pledging Exercises mic depression has made the need lois, 0
Held in Field House for initiative in this field more eve- Wester
Sunday Afternoon. ident than ever," said Jane Yearnd, Syracu
'31, "but training is essential." Theseg
MRS. EICHE PRESIDED Miss Yearnd was one of twelve mittee
junior women who participated in those a
Portia Lambda chapter of Zeta the Junior Month sponsored by As- Consi
Phi Eta, national professional dra- sociated Charities to further an to whe
matic and speech sorority, held its! educeh--nal project; it aimed to woud b
formal pledging ceremony in Palm- show thre public through the reports she lea
er Field house Sunday afternoon. fiven by the twelve junior women interest
Sixteen new members were pledged the opportunities in social service women
to the sorority. They are : Annette work. ring in
Cumminhs, s '3y.LucTeySalt:mann'33, Visited Hospitals, Nurseries, given d
Cummings, '33, Lucille Saltzman,'33, Regular supervision was provided equal v
Cecile Porter, '32, Florene Todd, '32, I for visits to settlement houses, day majors;
Ada L. Blockman, '34, Jeanne E. nurseries, hospitals, silk knitting conclu
Hagaman, '34, Eleanor Maxine Gil- mills (to observe working condi- the Un
more, '33, Thelma Dutcher, '32, Eve tions), and a session of the Juven- sentati
lyn Decker, '32, Frances Summers, ile Court. Lectures were given in
yn k, ,Fconnection with the supervised COR
'32, Dorothy May Davis, '34, Anne visits, wouldc

elegates were: University of
an, Rockford College for Wo-
)e Pauw, University of Illin-
hio Wesleyan, Dennison,
n Reserve, Oberlin, Miami,
se, Wooster, and Penn State.
girls were selected by a com-
of deans and women and
already in field work.
deration was given primarily
etner or not the student
e in a position to tell what
rned to a great many others
ted in the same line. "These
did not need to be major-
sociology for the programs
during Junior Month were of
value to the six who were
and to the six who weren't,"
ded Miss Yearnd, who was
iversity of Michigan repre-
ve.
NELL UNIVERSITY - "I
confer upon each freshman,
as he presented proper cre-
s and paid his full tuition,
sired degree," said a profes-
re recently.

WEATHER HINDERS
SCHEDULED GAMES'
Seven Games Will be Played on
Wednesday to Continue
Tournament.
18 TEAMSCOMPETING
On account of weather conditions
the hockey games scheduled for
yesterday afternoon had to be post-
poned. The tournament will be con-
tinued Wednesday afternoon, six
games being on schedule. At four
o'clock Wednesday afternoon on
Palmer Field, Chi Omega will play
Alpha Epsilon Phi, Jordan Hall will
compete with Martha Cook, and
Mosher Hall will be matched
against Gamma Phi Beta.
The games tUia are to be played
at five o'clock are Kappa Delta V.
Alpha Phi; Alpha Omicron Pi vs.
Kappa Kappa Gamma and Pi Beta
Phi vs. Sigma Kappa. The plan of
hockey competition this year is a
round robin tournament.

When the Gordon String Quartet -
appears here tomorrow night at the
Lydia Mendelssohn Theatre, underc
the sponsorship of the ChamberI
Music society, music lovers of AnnI
Arbor will have the opportunity to
hear one of the foremost chamber
music ensembles of the day.
The Gordon String Quartet was
organized by Jacques Gordon in
1921, the year in which he became1
concert-master of the Chicago
Symphony. His associates were
members of the Chicago Symphony
Orchestra and the first appear-
ances of the quartet were at con-
certs with that organization. In
addition to its successes in Chi-
cago, the quartet achieved wider
recognition when it was first in-
vited by Elizabeth Sprague Cool-
idge, noted sponsor of chamberM
music, to participate in the annual
festivals held in Pittsfield, Mass.
These festivals are attended by
critics of the entire world and have
introduced many Chamber Music
groups to the world. The Gordon
String Quartet won their usual
success and many important en-
gagements followed. Its popularity
increased to such an extent that
last year Jacques Gordon resigned
his position with the Chicago Sym-
phony in order to devote all of his
energies t o w a r d s popularizing
chamber music.
Not only does the excellent quali-
ty of the playing attract concert-
goers, but also the interesting pro-
grams which invariably include
novelties in addition to the classics
of the repertoire. It has given first
American performances of many
well-known modern compositions
and during the present season it is
offering some by Frederick Stock,
Alexander Glazounow, and Beck.
All of the other quartet members
have won recognition in their res-
pective fields as well as in the
quartet. Joseph Vieland, who has
been at the head of the viola sec-
tion of the Chicago Symphony for
the past six years, was first asso-
at the Imperial Conservatory in
ciated with Mr. Gordon in school
Vienna. Edwin Eidler, second vio-
linist, was educated in Berlin and
has played with the Cincinnati
Symphony orchestra and the Lenox

String Quartet. Nahoum Benditzky,
cellist, isea nativeofiRussia, but
has appeared in Paris and other
European cities before coming to
America in 1921.
Y -1

CALENDAR
Oct. 28, Nov. 1.
Tuesday.
2:30-A n n Arbor Women's
Club, League ball room.
8:00-Athena literary society,
League building.
8:00-Girls of Catholic Chap-
el, League building.-
Wednesday.
3:30-Sigma Alpha Iota tea,
Grand Rapids room, League
building.
4:00-H o c k e y games: Chi
Omega vs. Alpha Epsilon Phi,
Jordan Hall vs. Martha Cook,
and Mosher Hall vs. Gamma Phi
Beta, Palmer field.
5:00-Hockey games: Kappa
Delta vs. Alpha Phi, Alpha Omi-
cron Pi vs. Kappa Kappa Gam-
ma, Pi Beta Phi vs. Sigma Kap-
pa, Palmer field.
7:15-Delta Omicron, League
building.
7:15-S i g m a Alpha Iota,
League building.
Friday.
1:00-Luncheon for Methodist
women, League building.
3:00-Meeting of Pan-Hellenic
ball committee, " Lounge, League
building.
4:00-Sophomore C a b a r e t
com ittee, League, building.
5: 00-W y v e r n, Kalamazoo
room, League building.
Saturday.
7:45-Mu Phi Epsilon, Grand
Rapids room, League building.
8:00-Beta Kappa Rho, League
cave.

Moll, '31, Norma Bock
Josephine Timberlake,
Woodbury, '33, and H
nings, '34.
Mrs. Eiche, a patron
dramatic sorority, presi
informal reception and
per that was served afte
ing. Other patronesses
Spokes, and Mary Kent-
nant, '27, 28. Hanna L
president of the organ
the pledging ceremony,
Betty McDowell, '32, a
Johnson, '33. Corsages
to all the pledges by th
ganization.
Complete L

elman, '33, "Juvenile Courts are now trying a
'32, Eileen to take the court element away and d
arriet Jen- substitute an informal hearing be-V
tween the probation officer (whos
is in most cases a psychologist and
less of the the child," continued Miss Yearnd.
ided at the "Family case work has many open-
buffet sup- ings now, but emphasis must be
rthetplsup- placed temporarily on relief, though
r the pledg-it tends to be mechanical and to
were Mrs.-y lose sight of the human side. An
-Miller Ten- appeal to service through relief will
Lennon, '32, have to be accepted as long as our
.ization led present economic conditions last.
assisted by These people must be fed and
nd Frances clothed before we attempt to deal
were sent with theoretical improvements."
e active or- Representatives Were Selected.
Schools and universities which
Ane of Everything Musical
E MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE Op PIANOS

as soon
dential
the deg
sor her

VERY FEW

THINGS

Bring the lasting happi-
ness df a good portrait.
SENIORS, should have
their Ensian pictures at

the earliest

convenient

(LA ir

TH

VICTOR, MAJESTIC, BRUNSWICK A ADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit

time.
0 Ito
332 South State Street

UNIVERSITY
MUSIC HOUSE
William Wade Hinshaw
Devoted to Music
Cor. Maynard & William
Phone 7515

Phone 5031

HOT Wbw

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MONROE LUNCH
Corner Monroe and Oakland
Your Neighborhood Restaurant

I

JERSEY
FROCKS

Dinner

40c and

50c

Are

a

Mosher Jordanites!
Patronize Your Neighborhood Druggist
We Specialize in
FOUNTAIN SERVICE
SANDWICHES
TOILE'T REQUISITES
PRESCRIPTIONS
Prompt Delivery at all hours
Ann Street Dru o.
1117 East Ann St.PPhone 7850-9189

DECIDEDLY
POPULAR
Because tht new Jacket and
other new style effects are so
very, very smart . .
Because Jerseys are so prac-
tical for Campus, Sports and
Street wear . . .
Because they add a dashi of
color and smartness to the Fall
wardrobe . .
Because they were ostensibly
designed for the chic young
miss .. . .
Select several now at
Kline's where they're
featured at only
$4 98

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Milli1'nery Special
TODAY ONLY
Today only we are holding a special
sale of Fall millinery. Here is a wide
selection of the season's best hats-
nearly all felts, in black and all the most
popular shades. Hats that regularly sell
as high as $7.50 are for today only-
1%2L0

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K-

Di Mattia
340 SOUTH STATE
(over "Parrot")
PERMANENTS
MARCELLING

I

Sizes Style sketched is one of the many
14 to 20 smart Jersey Frocks at
$498
U U HAMPOINGB Is

SHAMPOOING

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