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October 28, 1930 - Image 2

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The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-28

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PAGE TWO

THE MICHIGAN

JbILY

TUESDAY, OCTOZF2 > P30

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METHODIST PASTOR
AT BIGGER
RELGIUSTENETS~
Forecasts World-wide Credo in
Address at Convocation
Services.
NEW ERA PREDICTED
Advises Discipline, Guidance for
Natural Strength as Key
to Happiness.
There is a great need for a relig-
ion big enough and broad enough
to embrace all existing creeds,
races and nationalities, stated Dr.
Louis C. Wright, pastor of the Ep-.
worth-Euclid Methodist church of
Cleveland, who Sunday night open-
ed the series of convocations in
Hill auditorium, sponsored by the
Student Christian association and
the churches of Ann Arbor.
The religious impulse, said Dr.
Wright, is as natural an instinct in
the newborn child as the desire to
eat, and it is logical that people
whose physical and mental make-
up, whose desires, hopes, and am-
bitions are all alike, should wor-
ship God in the same way. He con-
tinued on this point by saying that
he thought the present apparent
breakdown of the forms of religion.
marked the spring-time of a new
era, whose chief tenants would be
thoe few religious principles that
in all ages have guided men for-
ward to a better life.
Defines Abundant Life.
In discussing "Consecrated
Strength," Dr. Wright said that
most of the best features of relig-
ion that were being put forward to-
day pointed to themorenabundant
life. In defining the more abun-
dant life the speaker cautioned his
hearers not to confuse a present
day tendency to let life run away
with us or to give in to life's strong-
est and loudest impulses with what
he defined as the more abundant
life. Our strength must be diciplin-
ed and guided if we are to live our
mortal existence in happiness.
Condemns Dissipation.
Like the power of electricity that
flows smoothly in a high tension
power line to light and cheer the
homes of a community, so our
strength should be disciplined to
guide us our lives in an intelligent
active existence, rather than be
spent in thoughtless dissipation
that wrecks a life like the uncon-
trolled power of a. lightning flash
that shatters and ruins, Dr. Wright
concluded.
MAN, WIFE TAKEN
ON JOINTCHARGE
(B Associated Press)
GRAND RAPIDS, Oct. 27.-Lyle
Branch, a candy salesman who said
his home is in Jackson and admit-
ted he is the husband of a woman
in custody here who gave her name
as Mrs. Irene Harvey, was in jail
here today facing joint charges of
forgery with his wife. Branch was
brought here from Kalamazoo,
where he was arrested at the re-
quest of Grand Rapids police.
Doctor's Thesis Printed
s $ook byStephenson
Prof. Wendell H. Stephenson, of
the American and southern history
department at the Louisiana State
university and a graduate of this

University, has recently published
a book under the title of "The Po-
litical Career of, General James H.
Lane." This monograph was pre-
pared as a doctor's thesis for his
degree from Michigan.
The book explains Lane's transi-
tion from Indiana conservatism to
Kansas radicalism, and reveals him
as a leader of the "intense radical
loyalty" of the United States dur-
ing the Civil war.
Lecture to be Given
Tonight on Theosophy
E. Norman Pearson of Detroit,
president of the Michigan Theo-
sophical federation, will give the
first of three lectures sponsored by
the Ann Arbor Theosophical society
at 8 o'clock tonight in the Women's
League.
Pearson is a well-known speaker
in the field of theosophy, and two
weeks ago was guest at a reception
at the League.

Lo

uisiana 's 01
May GiveW

Id 'Feudal Castle' CapitTol [ R 1 SIN6
Vay to Skyscraper of MaleEDIt
V f

ayn o Sing" Hee
on -Co m Union Series

(BY Associated Pross)
BATON ROUGE, La., Oct. 27.-1
Louisiana is about to swap off a
feudal castle for a $5,000,000 24-
story skyscraper state ho'use.
The change proposed by Gov.
Huey P. Long already has been ap-
proved by the legislature and will
go before the electorate for ratifi-
cation November 4 as one item of
the governor's $135,000,0C0 public
improvement program.
If the plan is approved, the old
capitol wi'll relinquish the center of
the state's political stage a f t e r
nearly 100 years of colorful history,
giving place to the proposed marblQ
tower, for which plans and specifi-
cations already have been drav.
The old capitol, built in 1847 alhn
lines of a Norman castle, with d
tinct touches of Moorish influence
long since has been outgrown by thc,
departments of state, which h- ie
been forced to find quarters in oth_
er buildings.
For years the state house .ras
been a center of controversy be-
tween lovers of the antique and the
more modern-minded, who agrec
with a satiric view that it "is im-
pressively a handsome structure,
needing only the addition of a stick
of dynamite to make it perfect."
Of wrought iron, stone and fili-
gree, the old building long has been
recognized as a leading example of
medieval architecture in the United
States.
When it was dedicated in 1849
Louisiana's lawmakers sat through
their deliberations in its high-'
vaulted chambers by candle light,
the record showing that it was not,
until 1857 that a "modern gas light-;
ing plant" was installed.
It was here that the legislature
cast its vote of secession from the
Union.
During the Civil war it was seized

MORR OW, S M SON
IN ST!lFF FIG H T
New Poic Ii e Removes
NEWAEK .J. >. 27.The
contest for United Sas senator
in New Jersey has robbed this
year's campaign o the usua] apa-
thy of an off-year.

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Coloeatura, Descavred as Wr
Is New to America.
LAS OPERATIC STAR
jMadame Ciare ClafiBert will pre-
sent the second Choral Union con-
cert at n:13 o'c ock Friday night in I
Hill auditorium.
Maiame Clairbert, who, until a
short time ago was Iown only as
"Ma darl C.loratur," made her
jirst appearan e at the Theatre do
Ia Monnaic of Brusels. For six
ycars sh sang at Erussels, Aix-les-
aims, Lyons, Bucharest and Riga.
While im Brusels she was invited
by the king ana queen to sing at
the 11-ding of the crown prince.1
Her Americ n debut took place this
fall, whn she sang in "La Tra-
Wl? mt 105an rani .
91 firsm 210n2 for wlounded 50!-9
OC1ers m thi'1 froat E te scuts
and Watu ehose CK 1he imetI
as ner' a(Wflm?)'s. YSho wilU alsc
DC accomp~amed by Eugone LiOn,
flutist.
_ iktS for C1ie seris,; as well as
;kets Ir mdiv dual X co rrt , ma7
be ootainedl at the ollnwes of the
i3choi OIL Music.

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Dwight XV- NMo;'r beeane a
candidate us a t: months ago
snd the nation tok notice, He was
a fresh figure in the game of poli-
tics which now has him pitted a-
gain st Alexander Simpson, and Miss
Thelma Parl:inson, Democrats, and
against the nominees of the Pro-
hibtion, Communist and Socialist
Simpson is a candidate for the
full senatorial term of six years,
Miss Parkinson for the unexpired
tera of Walter E. Edge and Mor-
row for both. Miss Par:inson went
from Smith college into politics.
For the most par ,'.-ew Jersey
has turned its eyes and ears to-
ward two men, heard both of them
renounce prohibition, one of them
laud President Hoover, the other
bitterly asail him.
Moriow answers no charges. He
does not mention his advaries
Neither does he erize the issues
they rais. He L~e no specific
requests for votes for himS lf; he
asks only that the pope exercise
their franchise.
MONROE LUNCH
Corner Monroe in(d Oakland
Your Neighborhood Restaurant
Dinner 40c and 50c

Madame Clare Clairbert,

Louisiana's aged capitol (right) may give way to a $5,000, 00 24-story
skyscraper (left) if voters of the state approve pbins already passei by
the legislature.
and used as a garrison for Union youthful Emperor Ma milian of
soldiers. Fire swept through it twice Mexico, but wlhich failed to ar rive
during the war years, but it was re- before the fall of his empire.
built in 1889. Some of these were still in ux e
Later the executive offices were when Governor Long took office two
equipped with furnishings original- years ago. He had them moved to
ly shipped from Europe to the the state museum.

Wlhat -
Teatre's.
Majestic -"Wht A Widow" with
1' !i,% inn T' 4 rt" Tne '

Distguished coloratura soorano'
who 11 be heard in the Choral
Union concert series in Hill audi-
trium Friday night.
U'N1N REGISTERS
L LIA RD PLAYERS
Annual Tournament to Include
One and Three Rail Games.
Registration for participation in
the annual all-campus billiard and
pool tournaments, under the direc- i
tion of the house-committee of the
Union, will be continued in the bil-
liard room of the Union until Sat-
urday at noon.
Separate contests in straight-rail 1
and three-rail billiards and pool
will be conducted. One person may
enter all the tournaments if he
desires. As in previous years, the
winner in each contest will be pre-
sented with a silver loving cup,
while the runner-up will receive five
dollars in trade in the Union bil-
liard room.
Pairings for opponents will be
made immediately after the close
of registration on Saturday. Persons
who wish to enter these tourna-
ments should register immediately.

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WATL NG
L E RCH EN &
H AY ES

REPRODUCTIONS OF FAMOUS WORKS
MADE POSSIBLE BY CARNEGIE GIFT

Photographic Prints Exhibited'
in Fine Arts Reading Room;
French 4rt Featured.
Started as a part of~the general
expansion of the fine arts depart-
ment and made possible by the
Carnegie corporation gift of $100,--
000 in 1929, the fine arts reading
room of the University already has
a wide range of reproductions of
art of all schools as well as 10,000
photographic prints at present
mounted and classified.
The library is in charge of Helen
Hall, curator, and Esabel Hubbard, I
assistant curator.
Photographs form the main body
of the library, and are intended to
furnish students of the arts with
examples of the characteristics of
art in all periods and schools.
Architecture, sculpture, and pait-
ins, prehistoric tc contemporary,
are to be found by the interested
student.
They are classified for reference
by the same system used at the
Metropolitan museum in New York
and the Fogg museum in Boston.
The books on art number 200, and
leading American, European, and
Oriental periodicals are taken.
Among the special collections
started is that of 30 original etch-
ings and engravings including ex-
amples of Ausburg and Nuremberg
bibles, and works by Corot, Whis-
tler, Millet, Goya, Meryon, and
Haden. Seven Japanese woodblocks
have also been acquired, six are
modern while one is old.
A feature of the library is the
collection of colored prints of mod-
ern French artists; the school ofI
the nineteenth century being rep-
resented by Van Gogh, Cezanne,
Sisley, Renoir, Degas and others.
Thirty-five examples of textiles,
velvets, brocades and embroidered
pieces from China, Persia, Italy,
France and Mexico form the{
nucleus of a projected assemblage
of this nature, while a complete set
of the color prints of the Metro-
politan museum will supplement
the photographic material forr
study. A complete set of Library
of Congress cards is available to,
persons engaged in bibliography
compilation or research.
Lawyers Club to HoldI
First Informal Dance
The Lawyers' club will hold its
first informal dance of the year
Friday, Nov. 7, it was announced
yesterday by Leo J. Conway, '31L.
chairman of the dance committee.

RADIO TODAY
Dr. Roy D. Arn, of the surgery
department, will tell what treat-
ment is advisable in case of
burns and the danger that exists
in such injuries, during his radio
address from the University
studio this afternoon.
Piano solos byRaymond Morin
will punctuate the program.
The play production class of
the University will present an
original sit, Thursday after-
noon, written by Elizabeth W.
Smith, Grad.
The play, which was formerly
announced for Friday night, is
entitled "Wives-in-law", and was
one of the prize-winning plays
in the University contest last
year.

i I
Men Engaged in Traffic Control
Organize at Safety Congress;I
Plan Original Research. I
At tne recent safety congress
held at Pittsburgh, the Institute ofE
Traffic Engineers was organized by
I men engaged in traffic control
work and Ernest P. Goodrich, con-
sulting engineer of New YorlF, and
1 graduate of the University, was
elected president.
Dr. Miller McClintock, director of
the Erskine Bureau of Traffic Re-
search at Harvard, was elected
vice-president, and Hawley Simp-I
son, research engineer of the Amrr-
I ican Electrical Railvay association

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wu Te Sea Wolf" with
uSC late i lton 511Ps.
Gyn:.zatin.
-- u'v omres club - Book
Shelf and stage sections. at 2:'45
o'clock this afterioon, meeting at
the home of Mrs. 0. s. Duff endack,
2107 Devonshire road.
Adrlphi--Tiouse of Representa-
tives meeting at 7:30 o'clock tonight
in room 42Jp3, Angell hail.
Unde:gi-aduate Mathematical club
-Meeting at 3 o'clock tonight in
room 3011, Angell hall.
s r Con entwn

Members

New York Stock Exchange
Detroit Stock Exchange
New York Curb (Associate)
Dealers in
Invesiment
Securities
Accounts Carried
for Clients
Mezzanine Floor
FIRST NATIONAL
BANK BLDG.
Phones: 23221-23222

CH EiSTRY STAFF secretary and treasurer. Mr. Simp-
T TF son also is a graduate of the Uni-
PLAN GOLF DINNER versity and was formerly traffic
engineer of Detroit.
Plan Basebali and Tennis Games The purpose of the institute is
IWeathet Permits. "to advance the art and science of
I atraffic engineering, to foster traffic
engineering education, to stimulate
Open to the. graduate group I eeandt pooe h
staff of the chemical engineering professional improvement of its
department, a subscription dinner membsio emoraemercouss
will be held at 6:30 o'clock tomor- between men of mutual interests in
row at the Huron Hills Golf club. it btwfenengmadtests in
has been announced by Prof. Edwin traffic engineering and to stablisha
M. ake o th cemialengineer- a central point of referonce and
M. Baker of the chemicalenier- union for its members."j
ing department, chairman of the
committee making anigements Four technical committees werej
for the affair. established at the fi-st meeting, on
If the weather is favorable, plans college curricula, terminology and
are being made for a golf tourna- nomenclature, research and evolu
ment between the graduates and tion of the art.
staff. Tennis courts will be availa-
ble, and an indoor baseball game is--
scheduled -to be played. However, BRIGHT SPOT
i'f there is unfavorable weather, all 802 PACKARD STREET
afternoon events will be cancelled. TODAY. 5:30 ro 7:00
Wives of graudates ave been in- LAMB CHOPS, MINT JELLY
vited to come as guests of the staff. SAUSAGE AND EGGS

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The 1931 convention of the Mich-
igan Schoolmasters' club will be
held April 30 and May 1 in Ann
Arbor, L. P. Jocelyn, secretary of
the club, announced yesterday. Ap-i
proxime"t-y 3,000 teachers will at-
tend the convention, he said.
The theme of the convention, it
was announced, will be on questions
pertinent to secondary school edu-
cation.
Hinsdcde to Address
o-/ R volutio
Ilsk'se 'S
Dr. W B. nTidale, professor--
emeritus of the theory and uractice
of medicine and cust:odian of thef
University museum o archaeology
will address the Washrenaw chapter
of the Sons of American Revolution
at 8 o'clock ttonigtht at the Union.
Dr. Hinsdale, who is a past presi-1
dent of the society, will speak on
"The Archeology of i_-ihigan."

I v9u may not be
A MAN OF LETTERS
yet many a letter the college man
must write-business letters,
home letters, letters of a distinctly
personal and private nature ..
Letters written on Old Hampshire
Stationery are sure of a hearing.
The paper is rich, crisp, substan-
tal-it has both class and quality.
Hampshi re P per Co., FineStrtionery Depar!mvt
South Hadley Falls, Mass.

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Y""7 'IY1 Y °"' ''v T9~~!""I T" LA S T D A Y
Gloria Swanson
WEDNESDAY
i THURSDAY-FRIDAY

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TOD AY\

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Shows at
2:00, 3:40
7:00, 9:00

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Community Fund Drive
Announced Over Radio
Details of the Ann Arbor com-
munity Fund campaign are being
announced this week by Prof. Waldo'
Abbot, director of University broad-
casting, over Station WJR from the
local studio.

CORN BREAD
ROAST LOIN PORK
APPLE SAUCE
ROAST BEEF
NEW ENGLAND BOILED
DINNER
FRIED, BOILED OR MASHED
POTATOES y
HEAD LETTUCESSALAD
35c
WE DELIVER

I

JACK LONDON'S STORY
THE SE A WOLF"
WITH
MILTON SILLS
COMING WEDNESDAY
VAN & SCHENK
w oh BESSIE LOVE and BENNY RUBIN
THEY LEARNED ABOUT WOMEN"
Hear them s ng; HowL! at their clowning! Enjoy this lively romance of
baseball and the stage!

Joseph M. Schenck
'LU dWOX'
ased one ookSensation by
HERBERT BRENON
PRODUCTION
Winifred WestoverN
Ben Lyon-William Collier,Jr.
Edna Murphy

6h.m m

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41 t AGNA LL
(Also Published as the "Practical Standard")
Answers aMilli n uestifons Wit In the
-g of Humian Knowiedge
rplHE latest and largest abridged first: 1,325 pages; 2,500illustrations;
T Dictionary, based upon the 12,000 lines of synonymic treat-
world-famous Fuik & Wagnalls men's; 6,000 antonyms; 1,900 ir-
New (Unabridged) Standard which eign phrases.
cost more than M,500,000 to M, M authoriative-being the joint
produce. labor of 400 eminent scholars and
Spells, pronounces and defines experts in leading universities and
140.000 terms, including the latest- national institutions.ThisDictionary
,;l irn one alphabetical order, the is the "court of last resort" wher-"
common meaning of a word given ever the English language is spoken.

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One More Performance
MOLNAR'S

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SATURDAY

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