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October 23, 1930 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-23

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PAGE WO ____ * 1711. II nr I c t1 liAIN lUIA 1L Yv'Lr i?'~r'AN -. l .

W!GHT SEES NEEOS"CO
AS NEW t DUjSTRY.
Predicts Increasing PopularityI
of Hunting Will Bring
New Farm Revenue.
TELLS OF CONSERVATION
Shows How Farmers Can Raise'
Game Birds to Add i
to Supply.

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"If small game hunting continues
to increase in popularity, it will be
but a few years before the sports-
men of this nation will number ap-
proximately 10,000,000, and at the
present cost a $204,000,000 industry
will soon be developed," said Prof.
H. M. Wight, of the School of For-
estry and Conservation, yesterd-T.
in his radio address on "Game as a
Farm Crop."
Source of Income.
Just as new varieties of fruit.
vegetables, and pure bred stock
have provided a source of increased
revenue to farmers with foresight,
so will the management of game forA
the pleasure of the big legion of
Sportsmen provide an additiona
revenue for those who demonstrate

OLEY CANE' WILL MAKE DEBUT
AS T ROPHY FOR STU MP S AK E RSIIIL
TOf DISCUSS TAXES,
Members of Timber Industries
to Meet Here for Round
Table Discussion.
SECRETARY WILL SPEAK
Forty timber owners and others
connected with the forest indus-
tries will meet Friday and Satur-
day at the School of Forestry and
Conservation in an informal round-
table discussion of forest taxation,
Dean S.' T. Dana stated yesterday.
4 The group is composed largely of
nen from the upper peninsula.
They will be served a luncheon
Saturday noon at the Union at'
which time Shirley W. Smith, sec-,
1etary and vice president of the
University, will speak. The con-
ventions have been held every year
since the formation of the forestry
school, Dean Dana added.
"We will consider the possibilityI
of improving present methods by
modifying the present Pearson act
which provides for the taxation of
commercial sorest preserves, or by
determining the value of forest
property under a modification of
the general property tax," he de-
clared.
"The whole thing resolves itself
into whether the situation can be
met best by the so called yield tax
on forest products when cut, or by
getting more accurate valuations
under the present system. Under
the latter system it might be p or
ible to adapt the system used for
valueing mine properties to for-

GUM SALE SLUMP PREDICTED AS
TAR CHEWING BECOMES MANIFEST

Unless the Buildings and Grounds
boys soon complete their job of
patching the roofs of University andj
Mason halls, the sale of chewing
gum in Ann Arbor may fall off
appreciably, it was learned yester-
day.
The situation is like this: The B.
and G. boys are using great quanti-
ties of liquid asphalt for the pur-
pose of repairing the leaky roofs.
The solid asphalt, awaiting its con-
version to liquid, is contained in
large barrels that have been placed
in the corner of the University hall
parking place. There it is easily
accessible to all those who have a
tar-chewing penchent.
Officer Albert Thomas, in charge
of the University hall parking
glace, has noticed a few people
hovering mysteriously around the
tar barrels and then just as mys-
teriously begin chewing. Perhaps it
was chewing gum and again it
'MICHIGAN PAMS'
ACTIVE IN BOSTON
Alumni Club Chiefly Concerned
With Childhood Problems.
Probably the most unique alum-
ni organization of the University is
the "Better Papas and Mamas
club" which has become known
since it was first organized \ last
year as the "Michigan Pams."
The club originated last spring
when a group of Michigan gradu-
ates who reside in Boston, Mass.,
sought to seek a common bond
strong enough to hold them to-
gether, and upon realizing they
were primarily interested in child
education decided to organize dis-
cussion groups for studying the
problems of childhood.
After several sessions the group
felt justified in appealing to the
University for assistance, and ask-
ed that a member of the Univer-
sity faculty be senthto talk with
the members on the subject of
child psychology.
Margaret Wylie, then of the fac-
ulty here and now at Cornell Uni-
versity, was sent to Boston where
she conducted aseries of meetings.
Topics under consideration were
the underlying principles of child
guidance such as the aims and
goals in the intellectual, social,
moral, and spiritual education of
the child; methods recognized as
of assistance in child guidance, and
I contributions of modern psychology
to the task of parenthood.
The club is still active and if
present plans materialize a member
of the faculty will be sent to Bos-
I ton this year to'speak before mem-
bers of the organization.

Professor A. B. Moehlman, of the politics.
school of education, is attending a0
meeting of the National Council on The closest he came to this for-
School House Construction at Hot bidden subject was at the banquet
Springs, Ark. Professor Moehlman meeting of the Acacia Lodge of Ma-
Is a member of this group and plans sons, in their lodge hall at Ker-
to stay for the entire length of thechvlaeuanCdiacbu-
meeting which will last for a week.cheval avenue and Cadillac boule-
yard, where he mentioned crime
Two Postal Officials and grand juries.
Injured by Mail Bomb "The grand jury," Mr. Brucker
said, "is a necessary thing in the
(BY Associated Press> great centers of population and
RANGOON, Burma, Oct. 22.-Two they should be called periodically
native postal officials were injured without waiting for conditions to
here today when a bomb exploded get so bad that there is a demand
while they were opening a mail for one. The grand jury brings the
bag. The bomb was wrapped in a government closer to the people. It
parcel believed sent from Bombay. begets public confidence."
-v- -_-

might have been tar. At any rate,
Officer Thomas said that several
students have confided to him that
they have always borne a distinct
yen for masticating the asphalt.
"Good for the teeth; good for the
digestion," they told him.
"What's mere," Officer Thomas
remarked, "two professors have
confessed that they used to chew
tar when they were boys."
At that, perhaps the situation
isnt unduly alarming.
School Building Meet
Attended Ny oeilan

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RADIO TODAY
Dr. S. A. Graham, of the eco-.
n1omic zoology department, will
direct his address over the Uni-
versity radio program tomorrow
primarily to fruit growers and

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those interested in farm crops. Mortimer E. Cooley, dean emeritu
He will speak on the subject, and Architecture (right), and Herbert
"What Insects Do to Trees." Engineering and Architecture are sho
The Midnite Sons quartet will ho Tau, national engineers' debatin
present the musical program. his left hand a cane made from the p
ng the campus in 1887, ,which he will p:
interest assorn i this work, society, local chapter of Sigma Rho Ta
The investigations carried on by forth be known as the "Cooley cane."
the University to determine meth-
ods by which the annual increase of COOLEY WILL GIVE Ih
gamemay be increased have had TO STUMP SPEA
marked success, Professor Wight If T M P A
said. This investigation, he pointed I
out, has already reached a point To Award Stick to Most Active w
whee a few of the especially im- 1Se r ndg
poartant ways by which game birds i Man of Senior Standing t
th
Wiaybe increased has been found. in This Society. M
Can Maintain Supply.
"The three primary requirements Few trophies on the campus have fe
for all wild life are food, shelter, so rich a background 'of history a.
Professor Wight, "an area must adtaiina h aeodcn y
either naturally provide or be made soon to be presented to the Stump p
to provide these through out the speakers society by Mortimer E. Cc
year, if a good supply of game ani- Cooley, dean emeritus of the Col- e
mal s is to be maintained." leges of Engineering and Architec- P
Under a system partially outlined, ture, according to a statement p'
Professor Wight pointed to the fact made yesterday by Prof. Robert D. Of
that through its application, the Brackett of the engineering Eng- in
farmer can turn his game birds in- lish department, who is in charge se
to a farm crop, the net yield will of the society's activities.
Je, as with other commodities, in Not many who have seen the sp
direct proportion to the effort and severely plain, beautifully turned pr
intelligent attention invested. walking stick in the hands of the S
dean have realized that it ,datesb
EXPERT BERA TES from the-very earliest period of our st
campus history, when a picket m
bRUG FIEND CURE fence with a gate in it composed of th
posts in stagger formation protect- ca
Edmunds Says Pasteur Methods ed the campus from meandering hi
Will Not Help Addicts. bovine. T
Tradition has it that this fence hi
"The Pasteur treatment for rabies: :
could not possibly have any cura-
tive effect on drug addicts," de-
clared Dr. C. W. Edmunds, of the I
pharmacology department, of the
Medical school, a member of the
drug addiction committee of theWARNER
National Research council, when
questioned yesterday about the
gueer case of several Egyptian he.-
roin fiends who were recently re-
ported to have simulated dog bite in
order to gain admission to a Cairo
rabies hospital, where they said a
drug addicted friend theirs, who
had actually been bitten, had been
cured of his drug craving.
The United States Daily recently
carried the story of this incident. It
nmentioned that the doctor in charge
of the Cairo anti-rabic institution
noticed a curious frequency of dog .
bIte cases from a particular village
of lower Egypt. Since no parts of . -
the supposedly mad dogs had been
sent to him for investigation, as is
the usual procedure in rabies cases, ,
the doctor became suspicious and } r
questioned one of the patients. He
ftotnd that none of the victims, all
of whom claimed to be hopelessly
addicted to drugs, had ever actually
been bitten by dogs, but merely had BaD s, the r i
caused their village sanitary officer,I
to fIt the jaws of a dead dog with Close to her employ
a steel spring and with this ma- ; standard among
chine to give them the necessary biness woman wh
lacerations to send them to the hos- ionaJly involved
whom segvshr
More than 13,000 4-H club girls she gives her
will compete for the title of Ala- ~d e~hls
bama's healthiest in a contest cos- life is colored and c
ing May 1, 1931. association with thii

as the battle ground for many a
a.ss rush with the sophomores on
e inside trying to keep the fresh-
en from getting onto the campus.
In 1887 or thereabouts the old
nce was taken down and carried
vay to some "limbo of the lost"
the building and grounds de-
artment. At this time Dean
ooley was a professor in mechical
agineering. Someone in his de-
artment with an eye for values
ocured a few of the choice bits
the fence and t°.rned them out
to canes, one of which was pre-
nted to Dean Cooley.
At the Tung Oil banquet last
ring Dean Cooley determined to
esent this cane to the Stump
peakers society. The cane is to
presented to a man of senior
anding who has accomplished the
ost noteworthy achievement in
e organization. This member will
rry the Cooley cane throughout
s senior year and at the next
ung Oil banquet will present it to
s successor.

Dr. T. Luther Purdom, of the
bureau of appointments and occu-
pational research, will speak to the
Kiwanis club of Flint today on the{
subject, "Present-day problems in
personnel work."
Tomorrow Dr. Purdom will ad-
dress a sectional meeting of teach-
ers at the Toledo state school for
teachers on "Personnel work and
its relation to education.,,
These speeches are a part of a
series of talks which Dr. Purdom
will deliver from time to time in
different cites of Mchigan.C

us of the Colleges of Engineering gests," he concluded.
C. Sadler, dean of the Colleges of These conventions were first
wn at the stone stump of Sigma started to enable forestry students
g society. Dean Cooley holds in and teachers to obtain a more prac-
pickets of the old fence surround- tical knowledge of practical condi-
resent soon to the Stump Speakers tions in the field than could be ob-
%u. This walking stick will hence- tained through academic methods.
Kiwanis Club of Flint
ISTORIC CANE Hear Purdom Today

COMING FRIDAY-SATURDAY
Double Feature Program

Call 6300 this Afternoon

GEORGE O'BRIAN
in
"ROUGH ROMANCE"
Would you keep your mouth shut
if you saw a daring Northern
gunman kill a man?

LAST
TIMES
TODAY

F1

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NOW PLAYING
A drama with music-
Greatest in stage or screen
history!
Entirely in Color
with
ALEXANDER GRAY
BERNICE CLAIRE
Noah Beery
Alice Gentle
EXTRA
Sound Novelty
"Today and Yesterday"
Talking Comedy
Other Subjects

I -

Choral

ALICE WHITE-JACK MULHALL
INT

H ILL
AUDITORIUM
Single Tickets-
$1, $1.50, $2, $2.50
Season Tickets-
$6, $8, $10, $12
at School of Music

MADALR

4

Distinguished Belgian Soprano in
Uni0on onCerc

ecretary comes so
er-she has set a
men. The young
o may not he emo-
with the man to
working hours-
that her personal
omplicated by her
s man. See and
hat has started a
sies

Other Choral Union

Nov. 7 Alexander Brailowsky,
Pianist.
Nov. 20 Don Cossack Russian

Russian

BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD STREET
5:30 to 7:00
LIVER AND BACON

E

#boas trovers

Male

Nov.
Dec.
Jan.

1~

pp

with I
.......- . ow- .' -,a Ar AA--l rr .. a Wir i*

Chorus.
Serge Jarofl, Conductor.

SATURDAY

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