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October 16, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-16

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1930

'THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

PAGE LFIVE

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pp

_ _

CHAIRMAN CHOOSES
GROUP TO ACT AS
HOUSE COMMITTEE
Eleven Girls Appointed to Help
Supervise League Houses
and Sororities.
EXPLAIN HONOR SYSTEM
Signing Out Slips of All Houses
to be Examined Each Month
by Committee.
Appointments to the house or-
ganizations committee of the Wo-
men's League have been made by
Albertina Maslen, '31, who heads
organization activities. The entire
committee includes Geraldine Gro-
ver, '32, Betty Healy, '32, Mary Ann
Joslyn, '31, Esther Kirby, '32, Alice
Niederstadt, .'32, Betty Stein, '33,
Doris Swaim, '31, Harriet Townsh-
end, '32, Martha Wheeler, '33, Jessie
Winchell, '31, and Jane Yearnd, '31.
The committee supervises the
organization of each league house,
and keeps in touch with them
throughout the year. There are 39
league houses, 21 sororities, and 9
dormitories on the campus. Of
these each member of the commit-
tee is assigned four league houses
and two sororities.
Organizers to Talk to Residents.
House organizers talk to the resi-
dents of each house to impress
upon them the responsibility im-
posed by self-government, and the
necessity of realizing their part in
the honor system that prevails on
the campus. The league house or
sorority president is the direct
representative of each person in
the house to the League organiza-
tion and they are through her
responsible to the League.
Organization committee members
also tell their houses about League
parties, and explain to them the
point system and the activities they
may take part in.
All technical errors in regard to
signing out slips are referred to
the organizers. This is the first year
sororities have been on the house
organization list. They are not
organized by the committee but
their signing out slips and other
matters on which league rulings
hold are supervised by the commit-
tee.
Office Hours Arranged.
Miss Maslen will be in the League
offices every afternoon from 3 to
4 o'clock. This is the only time she
will hear League house complaints
or other business they wish to refer
to her. She will keep a complete
list of women's activities, and will
be able to tell from this list what
h o u r s volunteer librarians can
work.
EXECUTIVE BOARD
DFW. A. A. TO MEET
Every member of the executive
board of the Woman's Athletic As-
sociation is asked by Helen Do-
mine, '31, president of W. A. A., to
be present at the meeting to be
held at 6 o'clock tonight in the Wo-
men's Athletic building. This will
be a supper ;meeting, and is the
second meeting of the year.
PURDUE UNIVERSITY-Under a
n e w arrangement, the Student
council will have charge of issuing
automobile permits. This was for-
merly a function of the University.

AVIATRIX ESTABLISHES NEW EAST-
WEST TRANS-CONTINENTAL RECORD

VOICE PROFESSOR
SAYS COLLEGE IS
ASSET TO MUSICIAN
"So many musicians seem to feel
that there is no need of a college
ducation in their work," declared
'vrs. Laura Littlefield new pro-
fessor of voice in the School of
Music. "But I think a college edu-
cation is necessary for those whose
work is connected in any way with
mnusic. It provides the culture and
background so important to sing-
rs. Every bit of time spent in col-
ege makes one all the more able
to put into one's work that quality
yo necessary for good music-per-
feet understanding."
Mrs. Littlefield,. who is herself a
;raduate of Radcliffe college, and
who studied under Jean Reszlee,
the great tenor of the Metropolitan
opera Company, is qualified to
nake the above statement. While
here she took not only music
:ourses but also all the languages
,he could. Consequently she is able
to put into the songs she sings in
oreign languages much that is
otally missing in the work of many
>thers. She is a non-sorority woman
as there is no sororities in Rad-
cliffe, but is an honorary member
of Mu Phi, musical sorority.
The career of Mrs. Littlefield has
been an interesting and excellent
one. She came to the University
of Michigan from the East. During
the last two years she has been in
New York, doing concert singing.
Before that she was in Boston,
where she sang as soloist with the
Boston Symphony Orchestra.
She is a Victor artist for educa-
tional records. Some of the records
she has made are "Lorelei" in two
forms-one a simple form and on
the reverse side a more complicated
form, which shows the difference
to thewschool children. Also, she
has made folk song records anI
even little songs for children in
the primary departments. For 10
years she was a soloist at the Old
South Church in Boston, the min-
ister being Dr. George Gordon, who
is well known in Ann Arbor, from
the lectures he has given here.
"It is a great asset to the Uni-
versity of Michigan," concluded
Mrs. Littlefield, "that a degree in
music is offered. Very few other
colleges have this remarkable and
necessary advantage in their music
schools."
STODDARD
BEAUTY SHOP
Permanent Waves
$8 with six months service
Done by operators with 9
years experience.
We use Rainwater exclu-
sively.
317 South State St.
Phone 2-1212

SIXYTOENTER
IN TENNISTOURNEY1
Close Competition and Rivalry
Predicted for Winning of
Championship.
PAIRINGS POSTED TODAY
Sixty two women have entered
the tennis tournament to be play-
ed off this fall. This is the largest
number that has ever signed up
for competition and it is expected
that there will be keen rivalry for
the women's tennis championship.
The pairings will be posted on
the bulletin board at the Women's
Field House. Those who have
signed up are asked to take note
of whom they are competing a-
gainst and play off the match be-
fore Monday night. It will be
counted as a default if the players
have not gotten in touch with one
another and played off the match
before Monday.
In a recent analysis of the un-
employment situation in Detroit,
it was found that of the 79,127
registered unemployed, only 3,565
were women. Whether this is be-
cause women are cheaper labor or
because they are more competent
has not yet been determined by the
research committee.
Fall Modes,
Suedes
Black and Brown
Pumps and Straps
Satin-Kid
Pumps
Straps
and Ties
WHITE MOIRE
PUMPS TINTED TO
MATCH YOUR
FORMAL
'6.5O
HASPA S
hoot Shoppe
523 East Liberty
Michigan Theater Building

__

You will find Hats that are different
-and every Hat fitted to she head
McKINSEY HAT SHOP
227 South State Street

Associtcd Press Photo
Laura Ingalls,
who holds the world's record for 714 consecutive barrel rolls, is shown
greeting the crowd at Glendale, Calif., after setting a new east-west
trans-continental flying record for women. After having her motor
overhauled she started back over the trail in pursuit of a new west-
east record.

ALUMNAE COUNCIL
ELECTS OFCR
Mrs. W. O. Houston of Jackson
Elected Vice-Chairman by
Board of Directors.
BOARD MET LAST WEEK
Election of new officers to fill
vacancies was the main business;
of the Board of Directors of the
Alumiae Council at a meeting held
last week at the home of Mrs. W.f
D. Henderson, '04, in Ann Arbor.'
Mrs. William O. Houston '02-04, of
Jackson was elected vice-chairman
to fill the place left vacant by the
death of Miss Marion L. McKay,
'99.
Marguerite Chapin, '20, of Detroit,
will become' executive secretary of
the Board on November 1. Miss
Chapin will assume all the work of
the Alumnae Council, with the ex-
ception of the League fund. Mrs.
Henderson will remainin charge
of this fund until such time as it
is closed.
Mrs. Donald Hedrick, '25, of De-
troit, was elected to the Board in
place of Miss Chapin, while Mrs.
Louis Henry Fead, '15, was elected
to the Board to fill the vacancy
left by Mrs. Houston.
The remaining officers of the
Board remain the same. Mrs.
Charles W. Gore, '15, of Benton
Harbor, chairman, Sarah Whedon,
'01, of Ann Arbor, secretary, and
Mrs. Edson Sunderland '01, of Ann
Arbor, treasurer.

PRESIDENT NAMES
COMMITTEE HEADS
Eleanor Cooke Names Chairman
Committees of League.
for Social and Library
OFFICES IN EFFECT NOW
Jeannie Roberts, '32, has been
appointed social chairman of the
Women's League by Eleanor Cooke,
'31, president of the League; Fran-
ces Jennings, '31, was chosen to
head the library committee.
Miss Roberts replaces Barbara
Stratton, '31, who has until this
date acted as social chairman. Miss
Jennings' office was held until now
by Jane Yearnd, '31.
The social committee plans and
directs all the social functions of
the League. This includes teas,
bidge parties, and other such en-
tertainments the League gives for
all its members.
SOCIETY INSTALLS
NEW PATRONESSES
Xi chapter of Delta Omicron, na-
tional honorary musical sorority,
held an installation of the follow-
ing patronesses on Tuesday, Octo-
ber 14, at the home of Mrs. Alex-
ander G. Ruthven: Mrs. W. New-
comb, Mrs. Theo. Klingman, Mrs.
Alexander Dow, Mrs. C. Johnston,
Regent Esther Marsh Cram, Mrs.
P. Buckley, Mrs. A. Peck, Mrs. B.
l Edwards, Mrs. C. Love, Mrs. Bar-
bara Dewey, and Ms. O. Hunt.

You CanTell he ew Fall H

... . by the trimmings
Let your first hat be black as a black hat will look well with any cos-
tume, anywhere! Smart with bright colored frocks across the dinner
table! Charming with your new afternoon satin! Correct with your
suit or street frock of "inky" woolen! Let your first Fall hat be black
and you can go anywhere with the assurance of being well hatted.

I,
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