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October 16, 1930 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-16

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THTRSDAY, OCTOBER 16, 1930

THE MICHIGAN

D ATLY

................... . ... . ....... ..... . ... ............

x^pedition

Expects

to

ReC02zstruCt

M RIP
IN CP0PEINorEDEN
300 Men Search in Mesoptamian
Area for Archeological
Material.
SEEK CITY OF SELEUCIA
Letter Outlining Work Already
Accomplished Received
by Ruthven.
From the black soil of Mesopo-
tamia, the Biblical cradle of man,
science is slowly, and carefully ex-
cavating for objects which, when
completely uncovered, will be the
basis for the reconstruction of one
of the oldest civilizations the world
has known.
Under a blazing tropical sun, in
the area between the Tigris and
Euphrates, 300 men of the Michi-
gan - Toledo - Cleveland archae-
ological expedition, under the direc-
tion of Prof. Leroy Waterman of
the department of oriental lang-
uages and literatures, are constant-
ly at work uncovering the rem-
nants of an ancient day.
Search for Agora.
A large temple, pottery, terra
cotta figures, household imple-
ments buried by centuries of lava
and shifting sands, have already
been cleared away and the expedi-
tion is now feeling.out the blocksi
adjacent to past diggings, looking
carefully for the Agora or markett
place of the Helenistic city of
Seleucia.t
There have been four cities built i
on this same site. The earliest wasa
the city of Akshak, built in Sumer-~
ian times. Then follow Babylonians
Opis, Seleucia, and a later Roman
city. The city of Seleucia, forthe
uncovering of which work is nowc
going on, was named after one of 1
Alexander's generals, Seleucus. The
market place of this city probably i
will not be uncovered until thet
next level is reached.s
Enlarge Pottery Collection. V
A letter from Professor Water-
man to President Alexander Grant t
Ruthven, outlines the work already
done and that which is planned. e
"The pottery collection is de- t
veloping nicely," the letter states. f
"A wide collection of glazed and s
unglazed glass has been gathered. n
A complete set of scale drawings l1
of this glassware is in the process p
of preparation." t
Among the most interesting of
the finds is a "harpy," a human i
headed bird of bronze, probably .S
used as a perfume bottle by some
distinguished lady. Up to the pre-
sent, only two other of these D
harpies have been found; one is in I
Londor, the other in Berlin.
Then there is an alabaster statu-
ette, "The Black Madonna of theD
Chair," which is eight inches high
and three and one - half inches
broad, wears a head dress of plaster
and sits on a chair of terra cotta.
She is completely draped and traces
of gold bands have been found on
her arms and throat.
Evidence of excellent organiza-
tion and spirit in the expedition is d
given in Professor Waterman's let- i
ter, which says that the staff is C
splendid and that work is going e
along at a good rate. A well for
the staff house has held up opera- c
tions for a short time, but it is ex-tu
pected to be ready for use soon. n

BAND WILL MAKE
OHIO STATE TRI
Many New Maneuvers Planne
for Buckeye Game.
Details for the Varsity band
trip to Columbus for the Ohi
State game have been complete
Robert A. Campbell, treasurer o
the University and sponsor of th
band, announced yesterday.
The band will leave Ann Arb
on the special train Friday nigh
and will arrive in Columbus Satur
day morning.
The formations which the ban
will go through the afternoon a
the game are the most cxtnsiv
undertaken so far this season. Th
word "OHIO" will be spelled ou
first from a marching formatio
and will change into a "MICH
and face the Michigan stands. A
block "O" and a block "M" are als
planned. Eighty-eight men wil
make the trip.
ON HEALITHSERICE
Unprecedented Amount of Work
Accomplished During
Summer Session.
Health Service cared for more
students and treated more cases
in its hospital during the Summer
Session than in any similar period
in its history, according to Dr
Warren E. Forsythe, director of
the service.
September was the busiest month
the service has ever known. This
ncrease of cases was not due to
any epidemic or like cause; colds
and minor ailments were respon-
sible, he said.
"This illustrates what we call the
construction phase of health serv-
ce work," said Dr. Forsythe.
'More and more people are look-
ng to their -general health and
aking measures to maintain it, in-
tead of coming for treatment only
when seriously ill. This tendency
;eems to be slowly becoming na-
ion-wide."
Only 1,808 men students took the
xamination this year, in contrast
o the 2,102 of last year. The dif-
erence in the number of women
tudents' examinations was not so
narked with 907 this year and 941
ast year. The decreases made
)ossible an enlargened and more
horough scope of examinations.
The following figures show the
ncrease of patients of the Health
Service:
Summer Session
1929 1930
)ispensary ..........3413 5062
nfirmary ............1400 2600
Hospital.............1192 1405
September Service
dispensary ........... 926 1406
:nfirmary............. 22 27
Will Use 'Lie Machine'
on Cheating Students
(ly Asociatcd Press)
CHICAGO, Oct. 15. - The "lie
letector" machine is going to make
t unpleasant for University of
hicago students who cheat in
xaminations.
Dr. J. A. Larsen, research psy-
hiatrist, announced today he would
se cheating students in his experi-
ments with the machine.

P
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CROWD GATHERS ON FRENCH HILLSIDE TO' SEE

SOLDIERS CARRY

AWAY

EBRIS OF DIRIGIBLE

Above is snown the crowd watching workmen and soldiers as they cleared away the remaining skeleton of
giant British dirigibIe, A1-101, after it had crashed and burned on a hiiiside near Beauvais, Prance. The huge
air hip was on a flight to India. Forty-eight of its craw of 54 were killed.

University Radio Today.
Dr. H. M. Bishop, of the med-
ical school, will discuss "Cuts
and Bruises" in a tall addressed
to vnu1Yn0' rnrvvlp n ndV h+i ir

EARNING AVE AGE OF WOMEN $1548,
BUSINESS STUDIES BULLETIN SHOWS
Business women earn an average pacity than those receiving a sal-

mothers during the University income of $1548 annualy, as shown
. radio program at 2 o'clock this by statistics given in the current
f afternoon. The Midnite Sons bulletin of the Michigan Business
quartet will present a popular Studies, entitled "Earnings of Wom-
musical program following the en in Business and Professions."
address. Among the findings which were
compiled by Prof. Margaret Elliott
and Dr. Grace E. Manson, of the
Reserve Officer Count Michigan Bureau of Business Re-
search, are, that if allowances are
Nears Figure of 1929 made for differences in age and ex-
perience, single women are the
Total enrollment in the Reserve highest paid group of women in
. r Tbusiness, and married women have
Officers Training Corps, exclusive the lowest earnings.
of the Varsity R. O. T. C. band, is Work on collecting the data for
389, Maj. Basil D. Edwards an- this issue began in 1926 and was
nounced yesterday. completed this fall. More than 46,-
This figure ' is practically the 000 questionnaires were mailed to
members of the National Federation
same as last year's enrollment with of Business and 1Professional Wom-
the exception that this year there en's club, 14,760 of whom responded.
are 25 more in the advanced The statistics conpiled show that
course. i women who are working for them-
selves average a greater earning ca-
,11Iii lii! I11141111111I111111109@ii111111111111011111@0 itiIitu IuuI I III!! ii 1111i111
Announcing Our New Lines of
3 =Martin
Gibson Guitars and
Banjos
In order to guarantee to our patrons only the
- utmost value in instruments of all kinds, The University
Music House this year is handling only one make of
each kind of instrument-the one which we sincerly
believe to be the best in its field.
_ Martin Band Instruments are :noted for rJiir :on
superiority and the smoothness of their action. They
are equally adaptable for the beginner -nd for the
finished player.
Gibson string instruments have in them the spirit
of the master craftsman. They are designed to be -
always ahead of their field by several years, and the
reputation which Gibson Instruments bear shows the
success at this aim.
A Complete Line of Instruments Now in
Stock.
See Our Dislay

ary; earnings increase during the
first twenty years, remain about
the same for the next ten, and then
drop off sharply; average income
for the entire group is $1548, while
the independent worker averages
$2043.
In every profession and business,
earnings increased perceptibly in
proportion to the amount of edu-
cation received, though a decided
tendency on the part of those edu-.
cated to choose the less remunera-
tive professions, (teaching, clerical,
social service), was noted.
DICTIONARY OR CHEMICAL
EQUATIONS
Contains twelve thousand completed and
bala iw ul heical equations, classifiad and
arvanugaed for a aady reference. . It is no moire
iiH>ul t to find a desired equation in this
hook than it is to find a word in the Standard
Dictionary.
GEORGE WAHR-Bookstore
Jos North ]\laim Street

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11F

TH

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HAUNTED

'

A

T VE R N
TEA ROOM ON-CmON.T
"'Distinctively Different"

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LUNCHEON-TEAS-DINNERS

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Every Day in the Week
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DELICIOUS FOODS
REAL HOME-COOKING

71

4I

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