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October 12, 1930 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1930-10-12

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SUNDAY, OCTOBER 12, 1930
SORORITIES CLOSE R
WITHUNIQUELY)
Ocean Liner Used as Motif at
Kappa Alpha Theta
Dinner.
MANY ALUMNAE RETURN
Kappa Alpha Theta entertained
rushees at a dinner of unusual ap-
pointment on Wednesday night.
The dining room was decorated to
represent the deck of an ocean lin-
er. The flags of every nation were
around and across the room, and
lifebelts with SS Kappa Alpha
Theta inscribed on them were
hung on the walls. A large boat
formed the centerpiece for the
table, and favors similar to those
given at dinners on shipboard,
carried out the general theme. A-
mong the Kappa Alpha Theta
Alumnae who returned for the for-
mal dinner on Friday, and for
Pledges Sunday, were Margaret
Pollock, Marian and Marguerite
Widman, Alice Wolfs and Gertrude
Holton.
Alpha Phi gave a Founders' Day
luncheon on - Saturday at the
League. The Alumnae from De-
troit, the western Michigan alum-
nae group from Grand Rapids, and
the members of the Beta Beta
chapter of Alpha Phi at East Lans-
ing were guests at the luncheon.
Afterwards the whole party went
to the football game.
Among the Alumnae of Alpha
Omicron Pi who returned for
Pledge Sunday, were Betty Hemen-
ger of Algonac, Helen Maynard,
Frances Sackett, Ruth Kimberly,
Mary Roach, and Marian Reish, all
of Detroit.
Small china dogs marked the
placed of rushees at a dinner given
by the Gamma Phi Beta house.
The centerpiece of the table was
a large china dog with a light in
the center. A Japanese tea and
dinner were given on another day
and a style show was given at each
of the formal dinners of the sor-
ority. A number of alumnae who
have returned for the week-end
are Miss Laura Joslyn, Detroit; Miss
Helen Bush, Detroit; Misses Helen
and Ruth Kumerow, Detroit; Miss
Katherine Eyman, Marion, Ohio;
Miss Esther Way, Saginaw; and
Miss Marcelline Welte, Owosso.
k Alumnae being entertained at the
Alpha Chi Omega house are Mrs.
Paul Kraus, Detroit; Miss Elizabeth
Shillson, Detroit; Miss Edna Mae
Jennings, Miss Anne Hardy, De-
troit; Mrs. Maynard Newton, Ann
Arbor; Mrs. Howard McClusky, Ann
Arbor. Miss Lou Babcock, a past
national vice-president of Alpha
Chi Omega and Miss Aota Allen
Loud, a past national president, are
also guests at the house this week-
end. The chaperone, Mrs. Winifred
Ferrin, will pour at the tea given
for new pledges, this afternoon.
Collegiate Sorosis have several
former members at the house for
today. Among those present are
Miss Dorothy Leland, Detroit; Miss
Teresa Carrow, Detroit; Mrs. H.
Bullock, Detroit; Miss Emily Fran-
ces, Lapierre; and Miss Margaret
Keegan, Fort Wayne.

'THE MICHICAN

DAILY

lanxIMP F IV E

v I MCIANPGEFV

USH ING WEEK
APOINTEDPARIES
NOTICE
Intramural hockey managers
are to meet at 4 o'clock Monday
afternoon at Barbour Gymna-
sium. All sororities are requested
to send their athletic manager
to this meeting.
Attractive Rooms
Require Ingenuity,
Survey Indicates
Ingenuity is the keynote of most
attractive rooms. That co-eds real-
ize thiss tact is evident from reports
of several local furniture and paint
stores. Unpainted furniture such as
bookshelves, wooden book-ends and
jardinieres are gayly lacquered
green, or perhaps orange with black
trimming. These three colors are
very popular. Next year these same
pieces will be re-enameled Chinese*
red or perhaps old gold, stated one'
dealer.J
Tilt-top tables and magazine
racks are frequently called for, and
are decorated with paper transfers,
or with the newer wood carvings
which can be nailed or glued in
place. Practice and care enable the
girls to achieve remarkably profes-
sional effects. One store sold more
than a carload of unpainted furni-
ture to college girls last year.
Bright pillows, smartly-gowned
French dolls, cats with wide Che-
shire grins, or impudent gingham
dogs add frivolous touches. Many
girls buy potted ivy, ferns, or cacti
plants to add charm to their rooms.
Candles, favorite pictures, whether
etchings, water colors, placques, or
in an art student's own drawings
give individualistic touches.
India prints are used variously as
wall - hanging, table scarves, or
draped over chair backs. Lamp-
shades over mirror lights and table
lamps soften what would otherwise
be plain electric light glare.
When the football season is over
and women have more leisure to be
filled, the room of the girl across
the hall which seemed so far un-
changed from last year will then be
cleverly converted into a very dif-
ferent place by the use of a few
pints of paint, several yards of
cloth, rearranged furniture-a new
rose elephant, so to speak, instead
of the present white elephant on
one's hands.
UNIVERSITY OF WEST VIR-
GINIA - Arrangements have been
made by officials of the University
of West Virginia for an annual in-
ternational debate, which is to be
held here November 4. A debater
from Glasgow university and one
from St. Andrew's university will
constitute the foreign team.
NORTH CAROLINA STATE COL-
LEGE -A four-day school for jani-
tors was recently conducted here.
Among the courses given were:
Furnace Firing, 1, 2; Brush Push-
ing, 1, 2; Sweeping, 1, 2, and 31, 32.

MRS. HOYAL H EADS
LEGION AUXILIARYI
Associated Press Photo
Mrs. Wilma Hoyal,
who was elected president of the
women's auxiliary of the American
Legion during the national Con-
vention in Boston. She is a resident
of Douglas, Arizona.
Equal Rights Program
Sets Ten Year Limit
Drama will not mark the new
campaign f o r "Equal Rights";
Maude Younger, legislative chair-
man, for the "equality-with- 10-
years" program said recently.
The time-limit set for writing
into the basic law of the land
"Men and women shall have equal
rights throughout the U n i t e d
States and every place subject to
its jurisdiction," has been set at 10
years, or 1940.
Pamphlets are being published
to use as broadsides in opening
volleys on congressmen. Rights in-
volved include marital, citizenship,
property, jurisdiction over children,
eligibility to office, and contract
rights.

ORIENTAL WOMEN'S'
'CLUB TOGIVE TEA11
Club Established by Mrs. Jordan
for Foreign Students Will
Greet New Members. 1
ENROLLMENT HITS 100,
As a means of welcome and re-
organization for all foreign womenE
on campus, the Oriental Women's'
Club will entertain at an informal
tea this afternoon between four;
and five at the Michigan Leaguej
building. It will be conducted like
a meeting, and all newcomers will
be given an opportunity for mem-
bership. In as much as the enroll-
ment of Oriental women has in-
creased to 100, an increase of half
over the former membership, Miss
Maria Pastrama, secretary-treas-
urer of the Club, expresses hope
for a large gathering.
Oriental Women's C 1 u b was
founded last year by Mrs. Myra B.
Jordan, former adviser of women.
They met three times a week, each
day being devoted to talks from
those representing different na-
tionalities, or to the entertain-
ment of faculty members and other
foreign students. Among their
most useful activities was the es-
tablishment of an information bur-
eau on the first floor of the League
building through which any foreign
woman at Michigan may be locat-
ed.
ALUMNAE BOARD
HOLDSMEETING
Members of the executive board
of the Alumnae council met last
night in the League building with
the president of the organization,
Mrs. Charles W. Gore, '15, of Ben-
ton Harbor, presiding.

DR. E. SCHULTZ, NEW HEALTH SERVICE!
ASSISTANT, PRAISES UNIVERSITY SPIRIT

Dr. Emeth Schutz, new physicianr
in the Health Service, is very en- i
thusiastic about her first few weeksI
in the University. She came here]
from the infirmary in the Univers-
ity of California where she did spe-
cial worK connected with hay fever
and asthma. Here, however, she is
at present practicing general medi-
cine.
"I think the Health Service is a
splendid service to the University
students," stated Dr. Schutz. She
feels that a step forward has been
taken when students are given
such excellent care and protection'
against disease.
However, Dr. Schutz is not en-
thusiastic merely over the medical
side of the University. She says,
"As far as I have seen, in any other
campus, Michigan is the most for-
tunate in having those splendid
buildings the Women's League and
the Michigan Union." She believes
they are a very distinct advantage
to the campus.
Also according to Dr. Schutz this
is one of the most completely
equipped Universities of any she
has ever seen. "Michigan has such
splendidly equipped gymnasiums,
both for men and women. The
athletic buildings are a great asset
also."
"Your campus is lovely," she de-
WOMAN BARRISTER
'WINS DISTINCTION
For the first time a woman is
specializing in international law.
She is Miss Margaret Lambie form-
erly of Chicago and now of Wash-
ington, D. C. Miss Lambie is also
one of the few women allowed to
practice law before the supreme
court of the United States.

clared, "and it is all the prettier
because of the trees." Dr. Schutz
concluded by saying that the col-
lege spirit shown here was very
good, although there has not been
much opportunity to display it yet.
The interne-ship of Dr. Schutz
was spent at the University of
California hospital at San Fran-
cisco, from which she entered the
infirmary where she did further
work.
HARVARD UNIVERSITY-A por-
trait of Herbert Weir Smith, profes-
sor emeritus of Greek literature,
was slashed beyond repair recently
by a mysterious vandal.

MUSICAL SORORITY
IV AMES PATRONESS
Mrs. Wassily Besekirsky w a s
made a patroness of Mu Phi Epsi-
lon, honorary musical sorority a
ceremony held at the home of Mrs.
Guy Maier Wednesday afternoon,
October 8. Mrs. Besekirsky is the
wife of the head of the department
of violin in the school of music,
and has taken up her residence tn
Ann Arbor this fall.
Tea was served after the install-
ation service, at which members
and patronesses were present.

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Your ivew

FLORSHEIM
SHOES
ARE HERE-MOST STYLES $10.00
For Both Men and Women
Campus Booteryv

304 South State Street

* L. - - -- - ~ ---- ---y---.-..-_...

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iamonds, Watches, Clocks, jewelry
High Grade Repair Service
Complete Line of Everything Musical

YOUR MICHIGANENSIAN
PHOTOGRAPH SHOULD BE TAKEN NOW

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THE MATCHLESS BALDWIN LINE OF PIANOS
VICTOR MAJESTIC BRUNSWICK RADIOS
UNEXCELLED MARTIN BAND INSTRUMENTS
Terms to Suit

University MUSIC House
Devoted to Music
William Wade Hinshaw
Cor. Maynard & William Phone 7515

FRATERNITY JEWELRY

I

PARTY FAVORS

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ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcade

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For...
Evening
Hours
Just watch the stag go for
this fragile butterfly when she
dances in this heavenly frock
and-it's only twenty-nine dol-
lars and seventy-five cents.

October
Surprises
THIS is the month of sur-
prises in the fashion world.
New colors, new fabrics-every-
thing moves forward, as a re-
sult of which one would think

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