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June 06, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-06-06

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THE MICHIGAN DA-IY

:

I

IlbAL HbUflL
LL IN SECOND
INI UNIERSITY

11

Today's Radio Programs
(Ea..tern Standard Time)

INH NIXCjSGOES Ok STEADILY11

jMusical Organizations Complete Active Year,
Filling Out-of-Town and Local Engagements

FRAhTEMITIES
HOUSES TO Al

By Jerry Rosenthal

i

III

Pu 'II

Many Will Not Enter Until Last
Minute, Says Shaw; Number
Reaches Forty.
PLAN EXTRA FEATURES
Zhemistry Lectures to Be Given;
Ruthven Will Entertain
at Reception.
Enrollment for the second an-
Lual Alumni University to be held
une 23 to 27 Ias reached 40 ac-
ording to an announcement by
Vilfred B. Shaw, director of alum-
i relations.I
Many requests have been receiv-'
d for information from those who
ave not enrolled, and it is expect-
d that many will not enroll until
he last minute, so that the total"
.umber of students in the Alumni
rniversity will probably be consid-
rably larger than 40.
Irlaran, Toms Will Attend.
Among those who have signified
heir intention of attending the
essio~t are United States Repre-
entative Byron B. Harlan, of Ohio,
nd Judge Robert M. Toms, of the
etroit circuit court.I
Most of those who have already
nrolled for the alumni courses are
romen. The men usually wait un-
.1 the last minute to sign up, the
irector said. Shaw ascribes this
> the fact that the men are un-
ble to tell, because of business
easons, whether they will be able
> come.
Many graduates of other univer- i
.ties have written to the bureau.
f alumni relations asking wheth-
r they will be permitted to attend,
his session which is intended pri-
iarily for Michigan graduates.
Courses of Wide Interest.
The Alumni University is to con-
st of, courses of general interest
iven by prominent members of
he faculty. Among the outside
eatures planned for these attend.-
ig are a reception at the homne of
resident Alexander G. Ruthven,
nd a tea at the home of Mr. and
[rs. Shaw.
During the period of the Alumni
niversity, there will be a series of
ctures on chemical engineering
ponsored by the University and
he Society for the promotion of
ngineering Education. On June
8 and 19 there will be a sympos-
im on the heart for the benefit
f the alumni of the medical
chool.

In an international broadcast
from Paris, the reception of Amer-
ica's delegation of dry mayors will
be heard over Station WJZ at 10:45
o'clock in the morning. The recep-
tion is by the International Colonial
and. Overseas Possession exposition
which is now taking place in
France.
V. R. Jacobs, Goodyear dirigible)
expert, will talk to the radio audi-
ence on the past histo y of the
dirigible and will also tell what his
ideas on the future of the dirigible
will be. The speech will come
through the N. B. C. station, WEAF,
at 5:45 o'clock tonight.
Tachaikowsky's "Fourth Move-
ment from Symiphony, No. 4," "The
Flight of the Bumble Bee," "Para-
phrase in Melody in F," and "Para-
phrase on Black Eyes and Two Gui-
tars," will comprise the program of
the General Electric half - hour
coming over Stations WWJ; WLS,
and WTAM at 8 o'clock. Erno Ra-
pee will direct the concert orches-
tra.
With clear reception the outlook
for tonight, everybody should en-
joy the dance programs which have
been arranged for tonight. Nation-
-al Broadcasting company has Paul;
Whiteman, B. A. Rolfe, Ted Lewis,
Tal Henry, the Continentals, Rudy;
'Vallee, the Dominp orchestra, Don
Azpiazu, and Charlie Agnew to
choose from for dancing. Those
who like tango music will find
N. B. C.'s Los Conquistadores one
of the best in that-line. Jack Denny
and Will Osborne are Columbia's
outstanding dance bands.
In the line of entertainment not,
musical, there is the Cuckoo pro-
gram with Raymond Knight on
the N. B. C. chain and Hank Sim-
mon's Show Boat on the Columbia
chain, both coming at 9 o'clock.
However, neither are absolutely de-
void of music. Both programs usu-
ally have a large portion of instru-
mental novelties and songs.
10:45-Reception of mayors in Paris-WJZ
5:00-Don Bigelow andyhis orchestra-WOKO,
WXYZ. KMOX
5:30-Tal Henry and his orchestra-WREN,
WJZ
5:45-V. R. Jacobs, dirigible expert-WEAF
6:00-Kate Smith and her Swanee music-
WOKO, WFBL, WLBW
6:15-St. Moritz orchestra-WEAN, WOKO,
WBBM
6:30-TED LEWIS and his Musical Clowns-
WWJ, WTAM, WGY
6:35-Final baseball scores-WJR
6:45-Morton Downey and Anthony Wons-
WXYZ, WOKO, WFBL
7:00-Beauteous Ba lad s-WWJ, WTAM, WGY
Rudy Vallee and his orchestra-WJR,
WLSW J
7:15-HENRY BUR8IG with Nat Brusiloff's
orchestra-KMOX, WEAN, WBBM
7:30-Silver Flute-WWJ, WGY, WDAF
Pop Concrt-WJZ, WLS, KOKA
8:00-ERNO RAPEE directing concert orches-
tra-WWJ, WTAM, WLS
$:30-Domino orchstra-WJR, WLW, KYW

Broadcasts Tonight

Early Modern, Middle English
Dictionaries Progress
Under Faculty.
Work on the two dictionaries
that are being edited on the cam-
pus by facultytmen is progressing,
it was said yesterday.
"The Early Modern English Dic-
tionary" which has been under way
for over two years under the su-
pervision of Professors Charles C.
Fries, Morris P. Tilley, and Here-
j ard T. Price, all of the English
l department, has reached the stage
in its growth, where there are
I enough word quotation ,cards to be-
gin some of the actual editing, and
it is hoped, Professor Fries an-
nounced, that by October, 1931, a
real attack can be made upon the
immense vocabulary to be treated
in the dictionary.
The dictionary is to contain over
100,000 words and will be the larg-
est of its kind ever made. Never
before has there been such an ex-
tensive study of the words of the
period between 1450 and 1725.
There have been a few small dic-
tionaries of the period, Professor
Fries said, but this is the first time
that such a large task as this has
been undertaken.
An unusual amount of volunteer
aid in reading for words has made
possible the great advance of the
dictionary during the last two
year, The editors have received
contributions from more than 357
separate readers, representing 197
different colleges and universities.
The work of "The Middle English
Dictionary" is still in the early
stages of collection of materials
since it has been under way for
only eight months. The editors of
this dictionary, which will cover
the period from about 1050 to the
middle of the fifteenth century, are
Professors Samuel Moore and San-
ford B. Meech, both of the English
department. Professor Moore is at
present in Europe collecting ma-
terial for the dictionary. The fil-
ing and organizing of the slips :s
being done in Ann Arbor.

Michigan's musical societies have
completed one of the most active
years in the various organizations'
histories, a resume of the past year
discloses. Numerous out-of-town
engagements as well as local con-
certs were thefeatures of the sea-
son.
The Varsity band, the most col-
orful and busiest of the organiza-
tions, engaged in a highly meri-
torious season, it is shown by re-
ports from Robert A. Campbell,
treasurer of the University and
sponsor of the band and Nicholas
D. Falcone, director. During the
football season, the outfit number-
ed well overt100 and took two trips
to Ohio State university and Har-
vard.
The concert band, composed of
75 men, gave numerous concerts
in Ann Arbor and appeared twice
on programs in Detroit. During
the winter it played for basketball
and hockey games and in the last
few months gave several campus
concerts and featured numerous
University activities.
The Men's Glee club, under the
directorship of Arthur Hackett and
David Mattern, also enjoyed a suc-
cessful year. It also appeared on
a number of out-of-town programs
and with the band and Girl's Glee
club rendered numbers on the an-
nual Christmas and Easter con-
certs. The formation of a fresh-
man organization was a develop-
ment which featured the season.
For the first time in several
years, the University Symphony
orchestra under the direction of
STEADY WORK
Automobile insurance sales ex-
perience desirable. Drawing ac.
count and commissions. High
class proposition. You can make
$1,000 during vacation and pre-
pare for permanent place in or-
ganization.
See W. Ellis Peterson
Manager Insurance Division
BROOKS-NEWTON, Inc.
Brooks Bldg., Ann Arbor

David Mattern achieved a promin-
ence in University circles hitherto
unenjoyed. It appeared on six out-
of-town programs and several Ann
Arbor concerts and will make its
final appearance Sunday afternoon
in Hill auditorium.
A season marked by steady im-
provement was noted by the Girls'
Glee club, a report shows. Under
the direction of Nora Crane Hunt,
the organization boosted its mem-
bership to a total of 75 and gave
several concerts in Ann Arbor. It
also appeared onr the Christmas
and Easter concerts.
To Publish Last Issue
of Journalist une 9e
The tenth and last issue of the
Michigan Journalist will be printed
June 9 by 'the Ann Arbor Daily
News, it was announced yesterday.
According to the faculty of the
journalism department, members
of which direct the publication of
the Journalist, this will be the first
semester that students have pro-
duced so many editions.
The ninth issue was finished
Wednesday, and was printed at the
offices of the Coldwater Reporter.
Ruth Kitchel, '29, a former jour-
nalism student here, is associate
editor and publisher of the Repor-
ter.

Accomodations Furnished for
Reunion Crowd Expected
at Commencement.
Many of the classes returning to
the campus for Commencement
week-end will stay in fraternity
houses, according to an announce-
ment yesterday at the Alumni as-
sociation office
The graduates will take posses-
sion of the horises on Friday, June
19, and will leave on Sunday. It is
hoped that'next year it will be pos-
sible to obtain the use of part of
Mosher-Jordan halls for the re-
turning women graduates and the
wives of the reuniting men.
The classes which will use this
service and the houses at which
they will stay, are as follows:
1881 literary, Dr. Benjamin L.
D'Ooge, secretary, Zeta Psi house;
1911 literary, J. Fred Lawton, see-
retary, Sigma Chi 'house, Haven-
Angell group under Luther Coiant,
'63-'64, Alpha Delta Phi house;
1915 and 1916 law, Clark C. Couter,
1915 secretary, and William E. Es--
sery, 1916 secretary, Delta Upsilon
house; and 1891 law, Harry D. Jew-
ell, secretary, probably at the Al-
pha Rho Chi house.

Waiter F. Brown,

Postmaster general, who will be 1
heard in a broadcast of the Nation-
al Radio Forum from Washington,
D. C., over station WXYZ, WOKO,
and WEAN at 8:30 o'clock tonight.
POSTMASTER GENERAL WALTER F.
BROWN-WXYZ, WOKO, WEAN
9:00-B: A. ROLFE and his dance orchestra
-WWJ, WTAM, WGY
Cuckoo--WJR, WGAR. WREN
HANK SIMMONS'FSHOW BOAT -
WXYZ, KMOX, WFBL
9:45-Tony Cabooch, One-Man Radio Show-
WXYZ, KMCX, WBBM
10:00-Jack Denny and his orchestra-WXYZ,
KMOX, WFBL
Trrnaador of the Moon-WEAF, WRC,
WGY
10:15-BERT LOWN and his orchestra-
WABC, WORC
Tal Henry and his orchestra-WWJ,
WTAM, WGY
10:30-DON AZPI71I ,nd hi Havana Casino
orchestra-WGAR, WREN
10:45-LOS CONQUISTADORES, dance band--
WJZ, WGAR, WREN
Will Osborne an his orchestra-WXYZ,
WLBW, WFBL
11:00-PAUL WHITEMAN and his orchestra-..
WREN, WGAR, KYW
Jack Denny and hisworchestra-WXYZ,
WOCO, WEAN
The Continentals-WTAM, WRC, WEAF
11:30-Charlie Agnew and his orchestra-WJR,
KYW, KWK
12:00-Hotel Roosevelt orchestra-WABC
12:30--Ray Welch and his orchestra-WABC
WASHED, SCREENED
SAND-GRAVEL
ALL SIZES
KILLINS GRAVEL CO.
CALL:
7075, 7112 OR 21014

I 0 'Ai

JUST ARRIVED.

i

Colored

SHIRTS

Made of the finest Handkerchief cloth~
OWAL DKATZ

FAMILY CAMP

Ideal Vacation for two weeks. August 24th to Sept.
7th inclusive. Golf, Swimming, Canoeing, Sailing, Tennis,
Fishing, Camping trips, etc. Location, Muskoka Lakes dis-
trict, Ontario, Cajnada, Price for two weeks, $30.00 for
Adult; $20.00 for children.
Counselors for . children. Under direct supervision of
Matt Mani, Camp Director.
For further information address, Matt Mann, Athletic Dept., Univ. of Mich.
.1 ~ ~ --~ - ________-

Any tie in store
$1.00

814 South State Street

- ,. _ _ _

u - - ---I,- - - .

To the

1931

GRAUATING

CLASSES

We wish to extend our congratulations to those graduating.

These few last

days mark the conclusion of your personal contact with the University, and from
now on you will be distant from here.
However, there still remains a medium for you to keep in contact with your

Alma Mater.

This is the Michigan Daily and in

its columns you will find the

latest in campus news, the sport dope, and world news.
Keep in contact with the University andbecome a reader of the MIC-IGAN

DAILY. No matter where you will be the DAILY

can reach

you. Place your

subscription now before leaving this summer and you will relive your UnTiversity
life day by day, reading the columns of your University paper.
0 el.d w

Foreign Subscriptions -$4.50

Call 21214 and place your order or call at the Press Building.

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