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May 28, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-28

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

E MCHICGAN DAILY

rie ;WhenwAewspaper'
Ihes Near 'Ccago During Tests

FOR, CITY OBES
n A ~ ~~~~ rt 4 4f~t Ki

SURVEY OF AMERICA
NOW ON EXHIB
Amerwcan Art Institutc Chooses;
L. Mumford as Observer I
for Its Displa-y.

IT AT ALU

I

Seven Acres Plcdged W er Mic.Mcn
Out of Work May Grow At present Lhere arc on exhibi-
tion at Alumni Memorial hall two
Ccops for Own Use. groups of pictures. One, the "Sur-
-- -vey of American Art from Chase
Discussing the prOposed tiMei- to the Present," sponsored by the
ployrnent g irdeus yesterday, Mayor College Art Association, contains
H. Wirt Newkirk said that he hoped work by a number of that period's'
this form of city la or 1ould great- finest painters. Among th older
ly alleviate unemployment condi- artists in the group are such names
tions in Ann Arbor. as Ralph Blakelock, William Chase,
iThomas Eakins, Childe Hassam
The city at present has seven Winslow Homer, George Inness, and
acres of land pledged for this pur-I George Lukes.
pose. City employcs will plow this T h e younger artists include
land and buy seeds for such vege- 'Charles Burchfield, Edward Hopper,
tables as potatoes and turnips; Morris Kantor, Bernard Karfiol,
T.%JĀ±. L '1 L .L.T-T I Jr i Li PJ 3 ntJ Fn-~J

gene Speicher, Maurice Sterne, and
Max Weber. The prices of the sal-
able paintings range all the way to
$6,500.
The gallery also includes several
other pictures other than the reg-
ular exhibit. One of them, "A New
England Landscape," by Niles Spen-
cer, received honorable mention in
the last Carnegie International ex-
hibition. Another, a landscape by
Henry McFee, won a prize three
years ago at the Corcoran Gallery.
A second landscape by him, one by
Allen Tucker, and a portrait by
Luks, complete the group.
Lecturers Announced
in Oratorical Series
(Continued ,frorn Page One)

then the land will be portioned out
to men who need work the most,
and they will cultivate it.
The men, working unter the su-
pervision of a practical farmer, will
receive 30 cents an hour for their
labor and will be free to quit when-
w ever they obtain a better job. The
mayor hopes that 100 men may be
k .: x> v. . .. ,.a ..:., .employed in this manner.
yrv yL c ao Daily;News, from The Associated Pressj The produce from the land will
The wreckage of tie C hicago Daily News' speciagly.built ses Zane "Bluestreak' is shown above, after be kept in a cold storage warehouse
it crashed in a speed and endurance test Iear ar6M, Ellyn, M. The lane's crew of four men were all killed, during the winter and given out toy
dyin insantl. 1those who arb in need of it. Since
three dying instantly. apples promise to be cheap this

L'.JII YyCL'(Fj1y 'rl. VaiI1llIll rUM, r,11-

a

e ARCHAEOLOG Y RESEARC INSTITUTE
BECOME$ NEW ADM IN! rS 4TIVE UNIF
1 Committee Dates Back to 1924; tion of his research. The commit-
P IDurpose Is to Supervise,, tee now becomes an institute.
Wrirk in Near East. \ "Michigan's new institute; is sim-
ply organized. Its members, are the
e D Frank E. Robbins informs ksPresident, the deans of the gradu-
r rn . oate school and the College of Liter-
of a new administrative unit aid- ature, Science, and the Arts, the
thorized at the April gathering of librarian, the assistant to the Pres-
n the Regents. The University of ident, and a number of the senior
Michigan Institute of Archaeologi-, professors in Greek, Latin, ancient
e cal Research now takes its place history, and oriental languages and
e with the other adrinistrative com- literatures. It has a director, Prof.
mittees and officers who direct the Campbell Bonner, and an executive
various phases of the institution. 'secretary, Dr. Frank E. Robbins,
"Only in its present form,". ays who with Prof. Benjamin D. Meritt
Dr. Robbins, is this organization compose the executive committee.
new. The late Prof. Francis Kel! Its function is to supervise both
sey instigated it in 1920, influenced the field work in the Near East and
by a post war visit to the Near the allied researches in humanis-
East. Shortly afterwards, the gen- tic subjects which have been oc-
erosity of the financial support his casioned by the former.
e project received and the vast space' "The'excavations at Pisidian An-
for cperations by the locality, af- tioch, at Carthage at Karanis in
e forded persuaded him to create an, Egypt, and at Opis-Seleucia in
advisory body at home, hence, the, Mesopotamia have been publicly
organization in 1924 of the com-- reported, but the painstaking/study
mittee on Near East research. Three of papyrus letters and documents,
years later, Professor Kelsey died, of woods, of textiles, of glass, of
f and the committee assumed direc- pottery, of coins-in short, of all
_ i 1- v~a~i~ir~ienia r~tii~a~ hs~~sr4,

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What's Going on
THEATRES
Lydia Mendessohn-"The Fath-
er," preceded by dances by Martha
Graham, at 3:15 o'clock. "Electra"
with Blanche Yurka and Martha
Graham at 8:15 o'clock.
Michigar--Irene Dunne, Lowell
S$herman, Mae Murray, Norman
Kerry, and Ivan Lebedeff in "Bach-
elor Apartments."
Majestic-Charles Farrel and Elis-
sa Landi in "Body and Soul," and
Johnny Burke in "His Price."
Wuerth-Slim Summerville and
Harry Langdon in "See America
Thirst," and Betty Compson in
"The Lady Refuses."
GENERAL

winter, the mayor wants t store
up a suply of them and use t c in
welf are work.
McNaught Syndicate
Operator Addresses
Journalism Meeting
V. V. McNitt, owner of the Mc-
Naught newspaper syndicate, talk-
ed to members of the departizient
of Journalism at 9 o'clock Monday-
morning.
Mr. McNitt discussed the qualifi-
cations of the managing editor and
business manager of the small town
daily newspaper. He stated that be-
sides good training in Journalism
at a good school, the ability to
make friends among the towns-
people was essential. He expressed
the opinion that the newspaper
man who exploited only his paper
was of no use in a town of 15 to 20
thousand inhabitants.
Mr. McNitt came from his New
York offices in the Times building
to consider securing a managing
editor and business* editor for a
small daily he is planning t6 estab-
lish in the East.

Greek Students Form
Hellenic Organization'
Hellenic society is a newly or-
ganized Greek fraternity for the
fostering of "sincere friendship+
among the Greek students of the
University," announced Gregory G.
Florldis, '31M, the winner of the
declamation contest in Greek poe-
try.
t The Hellenic society was organ-
ized in the fall of 1928 and was
r'ecognized by the University in the
spring of 1930. Membership Is open
only to students of Hellenic de-
scent after they present a satisfac-
tory scholastic record.
There are 13 members at present.
The officers are Alexander N. Davis,,
'32, president; Thomas N. Vassil,
'34E, vice-president; and Basil D.
Anagnoste, '32, secretary-treasurer.
Canadian -Pacific -Ship

In the event a decision can be
reached on the time, they will be
Rafael Sabatini, Spanish writer,
and gorillas, and will illlustrate
their lecture with motion pictures.
The fourth date which has been
definitely decided will bring John
B. Kennedy, widely known journal-
ist, here on Jan. 27. As associate
editor of Collier's Weekly, Kennedy
has charge of a weekly radio pro-
gram, "Collier's Hour."
author of "Scaramouche," "Captain
Blood," and "Sea Hawk," and
George W. Wickersham, chairman
of President Hoover's law enforce-
ment commission. The degree of
LL.D. was conferred on Wicker-
sham by the University in 1927.
Although the number of lecturers
remains the same as in last year's
series, but smaller than in previous
years, the speakers are of a much
higher calibre, Moser said. This, he
explaihed, was in keeping with the
policy adopted by' the association
approving a smaller number of
speakers but selecting only those
who were outstanding.

l
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}
T
r
r
a

Is Inspected by Wales
SOUTHAMPTON, England, May
27.-(/P)-The Prince of Wales flew
here today from London to inspect
the new Canadian Pacific liner, the
Empress of Britain befoire she sailed
for Canada on her maiden voyage.
He has taken a keen interest in the
construction of the vessel inasmuch
as he launched her at Glasgow last
June.

F
F
4a
t
.
1'
L
U

TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of machine
Our equipment and pe
s o n n e l are considere
among the best in the
of twenty years' careft
0. D. MO]
314 South State St.

na ~
judi- ClassPresidents Name,
that Honor Guard Students
n as a (Continued from Page One)
reven- Baily, Robert Finch, Adrian Vers-
diction poor, George Bowers, David Line-
tmmit- baugh, Mark Harrington and Wayne
action Brownell.
uIscon Representatives from the educa-
tion school are f Howard Auer, Wil-
t mayliam Benz, Clarence Biedenweg,
Qpe of Ralph Coombs, Leo Draveling, Nyol
at the Hayes, Thomas Justice, Robert Mor-
nay be gan, Ralph Mueller, Thomas Prouse,
h the Alfred Steinke, James Smith, Ed-
.linary ward Tolan, Leonard Walle, Philip
conse- Wargelin, and Ralph Wills.
rly all Robert Woonacott and Henry A.
ch ac- Mullen were the ones chosen from
s been the phafmacy school.
house Men chosen from the dental
y out- school are: Carl A. Anderson, Reed
giving O.Dingman, Verne C. Piazza, Max'
trol. Potashnik, J. Gordon McLeese, and
Leigh H. Simpson.
parties The business administration rep-
e fault resentatives are: Richard Chapman
h the and Edgar E. Mapes. Forestry and
due to conservation, John Meier, James
g par- Seward. Music school, Kenneth Ball,
sibility, and Earl Burnett.
en ati, - - - -- - - -
TI fra3-l
at this
d.
n, the,
; until
es are
sibility ,T
at' WATCH
'3well R EPAI RI NG

-u inu objectsroug
to light by the field operations is
not so conspicuous. Yet all these
things are going on, ;and from timue"
to time the resultsĀ° are published
in books and articles. Here and,
there gaps in our knowledge of how
civilized men lived, at the time of
Christ and in the centuries just be-
fore and after are being filled in,
and new chapters added in the
story of mankind."
UNIVERSITY OF INDIANA-The
land of the university has been
engaged to play at the Indiana
state fair which will take place in
September. All members of the
baid will be paid for time they will
pla at the fair, thus giving them
an opportunity to earn some money
for their expenses.

G eo lo gi c al and Geographical
Journal Club Lecture-"The Geo-
morphology of Middle Brazil" by
Dr. P. James, 8:00 o'clock, room
4056, Natural Science building.
Recitadi-Students of James Ham-
ilton of the voice faculty of the
School of Music will give a pro-
gram at 8:15 o'clock, at the Music
school.
Answers to Automobile
Questions Are Varied
EVANSTON, Ill., May 27.-(P)-
There was an expression of pain
on the face of Frank Kremly of
the bureau of accident prevention
Tuesday.
The cause was the answer given
by one of more than 300 women
who took a written examination on
the theory of automobile driving,
which is expected to qualify ther
as either front or back seat drivers.
"What are the major parts of the
ignition system?" was the question.
"The choke, the speedometer,
heat, dil guage, gas guage, lights,
starter, accelerator, clutch and the
brake," was one answer.

BRiGHT SPOT,
802 PACKARDI ST.
TODAY 11:30 to 1:30
PORK CHOP, MASHED
POTATOES
COL MEAT WITH
COTTAGE CHEESE
APPLE, CELERY, NUT SALAD
COFFEE, MILK
30c
5:30 to 7:30
LIVER AND BACON
HAMBURGER STEAK
FRIED ONIONS
LAMB CHOPS
ROAST PORK, DRESSING
ROAST BEEF, MUSHROOM
SAUCE
MASHED OR AU GRATIN
POTATOES
CUCUMBER SALAD OR PEAS
35c
- --

117 N. First S

Clip this for Future
Number Reference
"The Movin Number"

ELSIFOR CARTAGE CO.
LOCAL and LONG DISTANCE
t. Ercellent Service I
Eiperienced Men
Reasonable Rates
Storage Service

17 N. First

STARTING -
TODAY

2:00-3:40
7:00-9:00

SLIM SUMMERVILLE AND
HARRY LANGDON
"SEE AMERICA THIRST"
EXTRA FEATURE
ETTY CObPSON
in
"THE LADY REFUSES"

AMERICA'S MOST BEAUTIFUL FOOTWEAR
NEW ARRIVALS

NOW 2:00, 3:40, 7:00, 9.00

I

11

AWAIT YOU FOR

*1

Decoration Day
IN
LINENS
TROPICAL CLOTH
WHITE KID
$3.85 to $4.85

1j, at. the
fraterni-
f; because
to what
ossible to

HALLERYS
St~e Strteelersq~

]The E.F. Mills Co.
118 SOUTH MAIN STREET

pother-Hit for the Girl whose Sa
Ion the Heart of the World-

situation

A "Wgr.p"

of a Pump

this Time

It's Laugh - Packed

AS

Pumps arc very fashionabie and nouce more so
than the "Wisp." One of the most delightful
features of the Wisp is its splendid fit, so neces-
sary if a Pump is to be a success. This Pump does
really fit, everywhere, and the style you like in
it now will stay in because it is built in. A true.

with
the ever popular
CHARLES FARRELL
and his new leading lady, the
gorgeous- continental star
ELISSA LANDI
Directed by
Alfred Santel
ADDED
Johnny Burke in,

N'
(:

car
the
roar
wn..
the

ray . ..

. .

WISP

mance with a Wa
IRENE I

I

l fi:T T (1U R ft h-kgrdc its scIne anti a I~ce 1111

- tow- Z --WA"

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