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May 23, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-23

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

Sorority

Property

Tax

High,

State

Report

Sh

['GUARDS CALLED TO QUELL RIOTS
IN SPAIN; HALT CHURCH LOOT)
i nl n

ELECTA' T[O OPEN
ORAMATI SEASQON
YURKAPLAYS LEAD

I..

Ht-

ANN ARBOR'

NEWS-BRIEFS FORSTR SC HO L
.TO DEVELOP AftEA

11

City;
t;
ODE

Henderson

Reports Successful

Performance of Actress
in Boston.
REGARDS PLAY HIGHLY
Says Right Way to Get Dramatic
Values Is to Leave Play
'Alone' in Acting.
Complete success for Sophocles'
"Electra" present this week in Jor-
dan hall, Boston, was reported in
a telegram from Robert Henderson,
director of the production, which
will open the Dramatic Season here

and sor-
ed higher
1 the city,
blic utili-
:rt made
commis-
ent of-its
rt reveals,f

JAMES B. PARKER Two Drivers Arrested
DI ES ATHOSPIT AL Karl Litzenberg, 418 N. Division
street, instructor of English in the
Resident Succumbs to Injres University, was arrested for going
of Automobile Accident. 38 miles per hour on Packard street.
Judge Bert E. Fry fined Litzenberg
James B. Parker, 719 Packard $10 and costs of $4.45.
Street, who was critically injured John St. George, 1707 South Boul-
Wednesday night in an automobile evard was arrested for driving 39
acendy gt inich an wombo miles per hour on Packard street.
accident in which a woman who - .
has been identified as Pauline bijeg CoffIe
Thomas of Detroit was killed, died
this morning at the Highland Park Cars driven by Mrs. William W.
hospital, Detroit. Parker failed to Baumgardner, Washtenaw Apart-
recover consciousness after the ments, and Mrs. Herbert Edds, 410
crash which occurred at the corner N. State street, collided today at
the corner of Madison avenue and
of Six Mile road and Northwestern Ashley strete. Neither driver was
highway. hdwre nteUi- _______
Parkery. r.t. hurt, but both cars were damaged.
versity branch of the Ann Arbor
Savings bank fore the past seven Man Dies From Liquor
years; he was a reporter, then a A
book-keeper, and at his death a i After drinking too much liquor,
teller. Mike Lacey, Y.M.C.A., died yester-
He is survived by his wife and day morning in the city jail. Lacey
three-month-old son, his parents, was brought in from 603 N. Fourth
and a sister, Mrs. V. O. Nelson, 927 street in an ambulance.
S. State street.
Funeral services will be held PROF. MU YSKENS
Monday at the Hildinger funeral
home, and the burial will be in
Coldwater.T

Eleven Thousand Pine Seedlings

Planted by Students,
Says Ramsdell.

Martial law was necessary to quell anti-religious riots in Spain when
nhobs burned and looted Catholic institutions. A Spanish guard is shown
here seeking to control the crowds in Madrid when marital law was
declared.
Today's Radio Programs
(Eatern Standard Time)

,

on _as.

s'

erty is
its ac-

commission,
he purpose
n as to the
y in Wash-
vs 'that cor-
Ked at 69.71
value, and
est on the
f~ its actual

d at

ugh few complaints have
ceived by Herbert W. Crip-
y assessor, attempts are be-
le this year to cut valuation
on fraternity and sorority
as other property because
drop in property values.
questioned as -to what as-
t will be made on the five
ties closed last Februaryf
ult of liquor raids, Crippen
t it may be possible to re-
ie assessments. Some of
e said, will probably be un-
pay the assessments.
Arbor Assessment Made.
total assessed valuation in
'bor during 1930 was $53,-
not including University
y which is exempt, Crippen
ssessments are made yearly
basis of two-thirds of act-
nation.
As on assessment may be
from the local board of re-
hich meets in June, to the
x commission, but decisions
boards are seldom reversed,
ted out.
ISURYOUIDI

In, connection with the observ-
ance t h r o u g h o u t the British
Commonwealth of Nations of the
n a t i on a1 holiday dedicated to
Queen Victoria and to the additions
made to the empire during her
reign, Prime Minister Ransay Mac-
Donald will broadcast from London.
Owing to the changes which are
expected to be made in the consti-
tution of the British empire, Mac-
Donald is expected to take advant-
age of the occasion fortakstatement
of his government's imperial policy.
Originating in London, the broad-
cast' will come over the Columbia
channels at 2:45 this aftenoon
over stations WXYZ, WFBL, and
W&R.
Henry Burbig, pioneer radio com-
edian, will return to the air tonight
at 7:15 o'clock over stations WEAN,
WFBL, and WGR. In his'new series,
Burbig will be assisted by Nat Bru-
siloff and his orchestra. Burbig's
presentations will last fifteen min-
utes. Although chiefly in Jewish
dialect, they include variations and
new ideas in connection with his
burlesque of the old fables.
A special performance of the old
classic, "Damon and Pythias," will
be given aboard Hank Simmon's
Show Boat "Maybelle" and broad-
cast to the listeners over stations
WXYZ, WEAN, and WFBL at 9
o'clock tonight. Hank Simmons
takes the role of Damon, while De
Witt Schuyler is the Pythias of the
play.
Jovial Ted Lewis and his Musical
Clowns tonight will be heard on the
radio playing some of the most
popular singable tunes of the day.
"The Land of Jazz," "Sister Kate,"
"Silver Moon," and "Bluin' the
SCHWAB PREDICTS-
BUSINESS RETURN
Says End of Liquidation Good
Sign of Improvement.
NEW YORK, M a y 22.--(I)-
Charles M. Schwab told the Ameri-
can Iron & Steel institute today
that there was reason to believe
liquidation was about over. Mr.
Schwab, chairman of the Bethle-
hem Steel corporation, is president
of the institute, which held its
semi-annual meeting here.
"There has been so much talk
aboutathe future that we have lost
sight of the extent to which the
deflation has gone," he said, point-
ing to the long /decline in commod-
ity, security, wholesale and retail
prices.
"There are many signs of stirring
in our economic life. The very fact
that we have faced this situation
and adjusted ourselves to it is a
preliminary to the better times, to
the favorable upward reaction. We
want to keep pulling for the shore.
We must not lose headway by rest-
ing on our oars, but we can be
cheered by the knowledge that the
tide is coming in."
One of the most encouraging
facts, he said, was that the coun-
try had met this depression "with
much less fear, less distress and
with much more organized intelli-
gence than in any previous period
of hard times."
BRIGHT .SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 11:00 to 2:00
EGGS, BACON,_TOAST

Blues" will be clowned through in
typical Ted Lewis style over sta-
tions WWJ, WTAM, IWGY at 6:30
o'clock.
Beauteous Ballads will be heard
for the first time tonight. This pro-
gram of burlesque of the songs of
the gay and wild 90's can be heard
from stations WEAF, WGY, and
WLS at 7 o'clock tonight.
2:45-Ramsay MacDonald speech from London
k -WXYZ. WFBL. WGR
5:00-Ted Husinros sport slants - WXYZ,
VVLBW, WBBM
5:30-Smith Ballew and his orchestra-WJZ,
S WBAL, WREN
6:00-Morton Downey with Nat Brusiloff-
WABO. WGR, WLBW
6:30-Armand Veesey and his orchestra-
WXYZ, WEAN, WGR'
Ted Lewis and his Mlusical clowns--
WWJ, WGY, WTAM
6:35-Final baseball scores-WJR
6:45--KREMLIN ART QUINTET --WGAR,
WJZ, WREN
7:00--Burlesque on the songs of the gay 90's
-WEAF, WLS, WGY
7:15-HENRY BURBIG, comedian--WFBL,
WEAN, WGR
7:30-Silver Flute-WWJ, WGY, WEAF
7:45-MARY CHARLES with Nat Brusiloff-
WFBL, WBCM, WKBW
8:00-Harbor Lights-WJZ, WGAR
Symphony orchestra, Erno Rapee -
WWJ, WTAM, WLW
5:30-Domino orchestra-WJR, WLW, KDKA
Secretary of Treasury Andrew W. Mel-
lon-WXYZ, WFBL, WEAN
9:00-B. A ROLFE and his orchestra-WWJ,
WTAM, WGN
CUcKOO program - WJR, WREN,
WGAR
HANK SIMMONS' Show Boat-WXYZ,
WFBL, WEAN
9:45-Tony Cabooch, One Man Radio Show-
WXYZ, WEAN, WKBW
10:00-Troubador of the Moon, Lanny Ross-
WTIC, WGY, WRC
BERT LOWN and his Biltmore orches-
tra-WXYZ, WFBL, WLBW
10:30-WILL OSBORNE and his orchestra-
WXYZ, WFBL
11:00-Jack Albin and his orchestra-WTAM,
WKY, WEAF
PAUL WHITEMAN and his orchestra-
WXYZ, WFBL, WFBM
11:30-Charlie Agnew and his orchestra-WJ'Z,
WGAR, WREN
12:00-Ambassadors--WOW
The Doodesockers-WLW
12:30-R.K.O. St.sLouis theatre-KWK
1:00--Dance orchestra-KOA-
} Midnight Merry-makers-KWK
What's Going on
THEATRER
Lydia Mendelssohn - "The Blue
Anchor" by Richard Humphreys.
Michigan-Duncan Renaldo and
Edwina Booth in "Trader Horn."
Majestir - Robert Montgomery,
Dorothy Jordan, Clif tEdwards, Ho-
bart Bosworth in "Shipmates."
Wuerth-Harry Langdon and Ben
Lyon in "A Soldier's Plaything."
Varsity Band to Give
Three More Concerts

next week.
Henderson's telegram stateu that
Blanche Yurka received an ovation1
as she played the lead before a
capacity house.
"My idea of the right way to get
dramatic values in the acting of a
play, and in directing it," Miss
Yurka said in an interview recent-
ly, "is to leave it alone. The great-
er the play, the more easily it will
carry itself."
Classic Plays "Perfect."
"I feel," she continued, "that the
great classic 'plays are so nearly
perfect, so strongly characterized,
and so subtle that we should deal
with them reverently and simply in
putting them on the stage. We1
should merely strive in a humble
way to do just what the play indi-
cates. That is what we are trying
so keenly to do in the "Electra."
"A great play," she went on, "is
never finished for-the actor or the
director. Every performance reveals
something new in it, as to acting
possibilities. That is one of the
reasons why I am so certain that
the Greek masterpieces are thrill-
ing theatrical performances, for
one never exhausts one's part. Of
them all-with the possible excep-r
tion of 'Oedipus Rex' - I regard
'Electra' as the best."
In discussing the methods of the
modern theatre, Miss Yurka de-
clared that " great technique is
needed to provide for the kind of
acting that the public demands."-
"Above all," she said, "an actor'
should never go past the point
where an audience refuses to be-
lieve him."
Was Inspired by Bernhardt.
"It has always been one of my
most cherished wishes to play the
role of the passionate Electra," Miss
Yurka stated. "For the last five
years I have studied the part which
attracted Bernhardt, Eleonora Duse;
Margaret Anglin, and Sybil Thorn-
"Of all the inspirations that have
illumined my work," she continued,
"I count foremost the last perform-
ances -in America of the Duse. I
saw her in three consecutive plays,
and for the firs. time in my life.
From the last of them I went forth
to wander the streets like someone
dazed, for hours upon hours."
"The story of Electra' is sim-
plicity itself as Sophocles wrote it,"
Miss Yurka concluded. "More im-
portantly, it is as real today as it
was 2000 years ago-all the emo-
tions move 1A today as profoundly
and deeply as in the times of the,
Greeks."

RIGHTMIRE SCRE
OHIO STATE RIOT
University -President Declares
Youthful Judgment to Be
Cause of Trouble.
COLUMBUS, 0., May 22. -(P)-
Taking cognizance of recent agita-
tions on the campus, President G.
W. Rightmire of Ohio State univer-
sity issued a statement today in
the official university bulletin in
which he said "the state of the uni-
versity relations has not been so
critical for a quarter of a century."
Referring to the recent mass
meeting of students agitating a
strike over compulsory military
training, the president said the
meeting was "born of half-knowl-
edge, adolescent judgment, lack of
experience, and somewhat influ-
enced by a body of writers who see
little good in our present day civil-
ization."
He continued: "The university
throughout 60 years of existence
has been remarkably free from ill-
considered or socially destructive
agitation with which the world out-
side has at times been disturbed.
The university has been a whole-
some, socially constructive and
sound educational force in the life
of the state, and almost without
exception the students have been
diligent in their work and have
taken a sane and well-considered
view of the world and their place
in it.
"Recently, however, certain stu-
dents have come forward as critics
of 'the university regulations and
procedures, and have freely attack-
ed university policies.
.. U:ER

P'rof. John . iuys en s, oi pnone
tics in the speech department, said
yesterday that he would teach this
summer in the speech department
at the University of Southern Cal-

t

In accordance with his last wish,
Robert Cree, an ardent angler of
Folkestone, England, was buried
recently in the English Channel.

ifornia at Los Angeles.
Professor Muyskens will teach
three courses, in phonetics, in
speech improvem4, and in speech
pathology. The enrollment in these
courses is, Professor Muyskens said,
already large and many more are
expected to join them.E
Last summer Professor Muyskens
taught these three subjects at the
University of Wisconsin and in the
summer of 1932 he plans to give
lectures before the National Asso-
ciation of Teachers of Speech in
Detroit.
YALE UNIVERSITY - Graduate
students here have been warned
not to use the grain alcohol in the
laboratories for beverage purposes.

Wajg esti
. Now
:00, 3:40, 7:00, 9:00 P.M.
Shove off on this
Cruise of
Laughs, Romance
and 1001 thrills!

I
.
f
t'
7
"
y)
!'
Z
Y

Eleven thousand pine seedlings
were planted last week on the Uni-
versity biological station grounds,
according to Prof. W. F. Ramsdell
who has just returned from the
station at Douglas ake.
In view of this, Dr. George R. La-
Rue, director of the biological sta-
tion, announced that the forestry
school is now co-operating in de-
veloping a considerable portion of
the wild land area of the station
into a model forestuproperty for
general scientific study purposes.
Professor Ramsdell is in charge of
such work with members of the
forestry faculty, and he is collabor-
ating with Dr. LaRue and his staff.
Much of the University's 3,500
acres at the station is typical of
the logged-off, burned-over terri-
tory of upper Michigan, and a large
part of the native seedling growth
has been killed by fires during the
last 15 years. Here it is that arti-
ficial reforestation is planned.

. /
e
r ><:,,;
s 4; x ..

LTicEgan
LAST TIM4ES TODAY

I1

I

A
ROMANCE
OF SAVAGE
PASSIONS!
AVISTA
OF 1000
NEW
JUNGLE'
THRILLS!

1 E

4

a
tip:;

eclares Congress Should
to Adjust a Steadier
Flow of Income.
:NGTON, -May 22.-(IP)-
adjust governmental ex-
o receipts is puzzling the
secretary Mills is convinc-'
ome changes are necessary,
Iso thinks the $984,268,517
iat existed Tuesday is not
asis for consideration of,

The
,whole
country's
raving
about it!

.{

Ey,

Dorof
in T
Dorot
tary of
brary,m
wide co
the Roy

repared a speech outlining
ws for the National Associa-
Mutual Savings Banks con-.
Thursday, and since he was
stant 'Secretary Ballantine
le address. At the same time,
ternal revenue bureau an-
d its collections for the .first
nths of the 1931 fiscal year
60,346,408 less than the cor-
ling period a year earlier.
are faced with a large def-
e said. 'Does this mean that
have been reduced too far
t the taxes that have been
d do not constitute a suffi-
well-balanced system to pro-
1 even flow of revenue from
year?"
ig other things, he found
'ith the fact that two-thirdsf
government's revenue comes!
acome taxes, which fluctuate
'with business peaks and de-
ns.
should so adjust out tax!
that year in and year out
vill be no great variation be-
receipts and expenditures
comparatively small deficit
tr will be offset by a compar-
smmr,11l sirrn1irc th nvt

Three concerts will be given in a prize
the next two weeks by the Varsity portabl
band, it was announced yesterday Pen sh
by Robert A. Campbell, treasurer local rE
of the University, and sponsor of pany.
the organization. Miss t
Next Tuesday night, the band one of
will play for the annual Lantern more t
night proglam on Palmer field and new tyr
on the following night, the organ-
ization will give one of its spring Symj
concerts on the campus. On June
3, it will make its final appearance
until Commencement when it plays
for another spring concert in front The
of the library. chestra
On Tuesday night, June 16, the of the
band will begin its rehearsals for ium as
the Commencement week programs on the
and will end the season when it series,1
plays for the annual ceremonies rector
on Ferry field. nouncet
* rr-=~=--t a Zt~A r r~. - - . - --___-_

thy Chipman Wins
ypewriter Contest
hy J. Chipman, '19, secre-
the William L. Clements li-
was a winner in a nation-
ntest recently completed by
yal Typewriter company. As
Miss Chipman received a
e typewriter through Rider's
op, 302 South State street,
epresentatives of the com-
Chipman's entry was judged
the 20 best letters among
than 500,000 describing a
pe of free-shift typewriter.
phony Orchestra
to Present Concert
University Symphony or-
will give its final concert
year June 7 in Hill auditor-
one of the regular programs
School of Music concert
Prof. David M. Mattern, di-
of the organization, an-
d yesterday.
,ii

The biggest
thriller
in years!

Never a
romance
like it!

-

I

I

LAST TIMES TODAY

f

't

.1

THE BIG GUN OF
WAR COMEDIESI.
WARN E RlOS' Mtrs

'i

II

II;AM

w ----

A_

11

'I Among the Best and at
Reasonable Prices

Bombshells of laugh-
ter! Explosions of joy!
A sweeping barrage of
howls and screams!3
Wik
Harry Langdon
and
BEN LYON

PUTUMS

ROBERT
MONTGOMERY
with
ERNEST TORRENCE
DOROTHY JORDAN
HOBART BOSWORTH
CLIFF EDWARDS
EXTRA ADDED

I1

Hai the New
Star-.

FREEMAN'S,

_ip

ip

,I

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