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This collection, digitized in collaboration with the Michigan Daily and the Board for Student Publications, contains materials that are protected by copyright law. Access to these materials is provided for non-profit educational and research purposes. If you use an item from this collection, it is your responsibility to consider the work's copyright status and obtain any required permission.

May 21, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-21

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

rTHE MICHICAN DAILY

ty

Judiciary

to

Take

Over

Disciplinary

I

1I
1 _,

HOPE TOSPAN ATLANTIC IN F'LIGHT
FROM UNITED STATES TO DENMARK

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lit

iTr

i1rf,'

EN?

Is

and

regula-
on the1
the fu-
Ittee of
instead
s or to

.1-

Associated Presa Photo

enforce-

ers Otto Hillig, 55 (left), and Holger Hoiriis, 29 (right), plan an attempt
or, to span the Atlantic in a flight from Harbor Grace, Newfoundland to
he Copenhagen, Denmark. They will fly from New York to Harbor Grace,
on and when weather is favorable will follow the) route shown in the map
of with a possible stop in England.
.ja _ It

Of GENtRAL''
P RECQVERED

will enforce rushing,
,nd initiating rules, as
termine the scholastic
o be met by the general
. It will impose penalties
ure to meet such stand-

of the committee
less altered byethe
ee on Student Af-
n of the council at
he Senate Commit-
Affairs feels that
adiciary committee
:elayed, it may call
consideration and
committee of fur=
npt to keep the
i direct contact
ciary committee
lize the work of
i office has been
third floor of the
s will work here

Army Engineers Direct Workof
Cutting Through Debris;
Woman Rescued.
TOURS, France, May 20.-(RP)-
Police and volunteers directed by
Army engineers today recovered
the body of Gen. Robert H. Dunlap,
U. S. M. C., from the Tuins of a barn'
adjoining the chateau of Cimqmars,
where he was buried under a land-
slide Tuesday.
They also brought out the body
of Denis Briant, a farmer on the
estate, and rescued Mme. Briant,
alive blut badly injured.
Mme. Briant's leg was amputated
by a surgeon who had remained at
the place all night in the hope that
all the three might still be living
when the debris was cleared away.
She is in critical condition.
The woman had taken refuge in
a Stone Age cave over which the
barn was built. There was air there
and when the rescuers heard her
cries early this morning they man-
aged to run in a tube through
which they fed her some milk.
It appeared that the General and
Briant had been crushed to death
as they rushed into the barn to
save the woman when the land-
slide came,
Audubon Organization
to Meet at Bay City

What's,
Going
an
THEATRES
Majestic-Fay Wray and Victor
Varconi in "Captain Thunder."
Michigan - Duncan Renaldo and
Edwina Booth in "Trader Horn."
Wuerth - Harry Langdon and
Ben Lyon in "A Soldier's Play-
thing."
LECTURES
University - "Great Japan," by
Prof. Glenn T. Trewartha, of the
department of geography of the
University of Wisconsin, 8 o'clock,
Natural Science auditorium.
All - Campus Forum - ."Herbert
Hoover and His Administration" by
Dr. Paul M. Cuncannon, professor
of political science, 4:15 o'clock,
room D, Alumni Memorial hall.
GENERAL
Poetry Recital-Michigan Inter-
pretative ,Arts society will give pro-
gram of interpretations of poetry,
at 7:30 o'clock, room 302, Mason
hall.
Legion's Poppy Sale
to Be Held.Saturday,

BROKHAT MAKE
PLEA FOR NATIONL
FARIM BAN4KCHI
Believes System Would Assist
in Bringing Agriculture
Out of Depression.
HITS FEDERAL RESERVE
Says Board in Control of Land
and, Credit Banks Should
Be Abolished.
WASHINGTON, May 20.-(Al)-
Describing the federal land and in-
tdrmediate credit banks as "in the
control of Wall Street representa-
tives," Senator Brookhart, Republi-
can, Iowa, suggested today that
farmers be allowed to establish a
banking system of their own.
Such a move, he said in an ad-
dress over the National Broadcast-
ing system, would lay the founda-
tion fqr success of efforts to bring
agriculture out of the depression,
"an established institution since
1920."
The board which now controls
the federal land and intermediate
credit banks, Brookhart asserted,
should be abolished and the insti-
tutions turned over to the farm
board. Then the latter should be
authorized to develop a complete
co-operative banking system, he
added.
Blocked by Present Laws.
"When this is organized and de-
veloped, it would supplement the
nye essity for government money
and enable the farmers to finance
their own co-oper tive proposi-
tions," Brookhart sai.
"At present they have no permis-
sion even to organize such a system
under either the laws of the states
or the United States. The big fi-
nancial interests have watched
these laws and kept all such au-
thority from them."
He blamed the federal reserve
board for having done "more to
bring about the agricultural depres-
sion than all other causes com-
bined," and said if the farm board
"does not want to be abolished" it
should back legislation for an "effi-
cient and nation-wide co-operative
banking system."
Urges Act's Amendment.:
The simplest way to establish the
system, he said, would be "to amend
the immediate credit act and
change that bahk into a nation-
al co-operative reserve bank with
all the poers of the federal re-
serve bank, including the power to
issue co-operative reserve notes as
currency upon the same security as
the federal reserve bank itself.."
"As our banking system is now
controlled," Brook hart contended,
"even the surplus cedits and de-
posits of the farmers themselves
are sent away to New York to be
loaned to brokers in stock gambling
at a low rate of interest, as low as
1 per cent, while farmers must pay
from 6 to 12 per cent for loans to
produce the food of life itself."
British Royalty Holds
Court for 400 Women
LONDON, May 20.-(A)- More
than 400 women, including 11 Amer-
icans, last night were presented to
King George and Queen Mary in
the first court of the season. The
Americans included Mrs. Ralph H.
Booth, wife of the American envoy
to Denmark, of Detroit.
Their Majesties sat on their great

golden throne in the ballroomi of
Buckingham Palace. Great crowds
assembled outside the palace to get
a glimpse of . the debutantes and
matrons as they lined up in glisten-
ing limousines some hours ahead of
time.

Col. Edwin George One Donor;
Bears, Foxes, Snakes
in Collection.

Gifts of two philanthropists, ones
an anonymous donor, the other
Colonel Edwin S. George, have giv-
er: the University museums two
1o n g - advocated's tupplemntary
units.?
The gift of the anonymous donor1
was a sufficient amount of money'
to make possible the construction
of "the first two units of a small
zoo for the exhibition of Michigan
manfmals and reptiles on the mus-
eums grounds," laccording to the
annual report of that body. Colonel
George's gift was a 1,200-acre re-
serve.
The zoo was erected early in the
fall and was "constructed to service
adequately -the outdoor runs for
the animals." Animals now housed
in the zoo are two black bears, one
red fox, one wildcat, one badger,
two skunks, four raccoons, and two
porcupines. They are all natives of
the state, most of ther the present
of the Michigan state department.
of conservation.
Recently constructed and put in-
to service is the turtle and snake
pen, erected along-side of the zoo.
Turtles contained in this pen are
blanding, spotted, pond, woods,
snapper, musk, soft shell, map, and
box. Blue racers, hog-nose, water,
garter, ribbon, milk and fox snakes
are also housed there.
The presentation was made in
order to give the crippled children
at the hospital an opportunity to.
watch the live animals.
The other gift was a reserve, sit-
uated 20 miles northwest of Ann
Arbor, byaColonel George. The re-
serve was Colonel George's own
tract, "with morainal knob and ba-
sin topography, presenting a splen-
did series of habitats varying from
tamarack bogs to oak and hickory
ridges." Six miles of game-tight
fence surround it, enclosing also
four houses.
Colonel George has maintained
on the tract deer and antelope un-

der natural conditions, and they
have prospered, it says. "Trails

More Than 50 Applications Are
gefused; Taylor Is Head
of Committee.
More than 50 applications for
tickets to the Senior ball, to be held
on Friday night, May 29, in the
Union, have been refused follow-
ing the completion of the sale of
the 250 available tickets on Tues-
day, it has been announced.
Students to serve on the general
ball committee were announced
yesterday by Vinal O. Taylor, '31,
chairman. They are Jean M. Bos-
well, '31, secretary, Albert J. Klick,
'31, treasurer, J. Palmer "Crawford,
'31, music, 'Millard B. Deutsch, '31,
tickets, Keith F. Bennett, '31, pro-
grams, Charles W. Cory, '31, invi-
tations, Robert W. Scoville, '31E,
publicity, George J. Weyl, '31E,
floor, Robert M. Young, '31E, dec-
orations.
The following comprise the ticketl
committee: John L. Keyes, '31M,
James M. Keenan, '31D, Julia Con-
lin, '31A, Benjamin A. Patch, '31
Bus. Ad., Katherine Wilcox, '31?,
Peter M. Scott, '31; Dorothy Meade,
'31Ed, and Ragnhild Moe, '31SM.
Hoover Hopes to Cut
Federal Expenditures

BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
COLD ROAST VEAL OR
HAMBURGER WITH
DUCHESS POTATO S OR
BUTTERED RI E
TOMATO & LETTUCE SALAD
JELLO
COFFEE,MILK
30c
5:30 to 7:30
SOUP
BAKED. STUFFED HEART
HAMBURGER STEAK, CHILI
SAUCE
ROAST PORK, DRESSING
LAMB PATTIES, MINT JELLY
ROAST BEEF
MASHED OR OVEN FRIED
POTATOES
STRING BEANS OR COTTAGE
CHEESE
35c
MICHIGAN

GIFTS TO MUSEUM MAKE POSSIBLE
SMALL ZOO AND ANIMAL RESERVE

have been laid out to make the re-
serve readily available and everyk
effort has been made to conserve
the natural conditions," the report
declares.
According to his letter to the Re-
gents, the gift was made in order
that students "may here find ma-
terial for observation and satisfy
and develop the love of God's out-
of-doors." The tract is known as
the Edwin S. George reserve.
T IKTS FRBALL,

PHARMACY SCHOOL
HONORSSCHOLAHS
Outstanding Students and Prize
Winners Recognized at
Banquet.
Students who, during the last
year, attained high scholarship and
who won special awards were hon-
ored at a recognition banquet of
the College of Pharmacy, held last
night in the League.
Three awards to outstanding stu-
dents were made by Dean Edward
H. Kraus. Florence Hartsuff, '34P,
of Ann Arbor, was given the Rho
Chi prize for having attained the
highest scholarship in the fresh-
man class. Robert D. Swisher, '31P,
of Ann Arbor, was awarded tho
Lehn and Fink medal, while the
Charles R. Eckler prize fo profi-
ciency in pharmacognosy was won
by Yo Chok ,Wong, '32P, of Canton,
China.
At the same time, Dean Kraus
announced that Anton C. Sibilsky,
'31P, and Harvey M. Wecleu, '31P,
will be initiated into Rho Chi, hone
orary scholarship society in phar-
macy.
Dr. W. B. Hinsdale, for many
years dean of the homeopathic
hospital here and who now is in
charge of' Michigan archaeology,
was the principal speaker.

Alumni Notes

I

ring recognition
'nity must obtain
ie judiciary comn-
senting its peti-
te Committee on

William W. Campbell, '86, director
of the Lick observatory and former
president of the University of Cali-
fornia, was elected president of the
National Academy of Sciences at a
session held recently in Washing-
ton.
Dean Henry M. Bates, '90, of the
Law school, was the principal
speaker at the annual banquet of
the University of Michigan club of
South Bend, held on May 1. More
than 70 Michigan alumni were
present.
A group of faculty members and
alumni have been invited to visit
the Ford trade school and points of
interest in the factory on June 9.
George H. Sisler, '15E, who is now
playing with the Rochester Red
Wings of Rochester, N.Y., was pre-
sented with a bouquet of flowers by
President Brainard M. Wilson, '22,
of the Rochester Alumni club at
the opening game of the season.
TODAY

WASHINGTON, May 20. -(1)-1
Through his economy program,
President Hoover hopes to cut gov-
ernment expenditures to such an
extent that a tax increase will be
unnecessary.
By paring down the outlays of
the various government depart-
ments he expects to save from $125,-
000,000 to $150,000,000 next year
with other reductions in succeed-
ing years.
Debating Organization
Names Levy President
Delta Sigma Rho, honorary de-
bating society, elected its officers
for next year at its meeting Tues-
day night. Nathan Levy, '31, was
elected president. The other offi-
cers elected were Victor Rabino-
witz, '31, vice president, and Doro-
thy Daniels, '32, secretary.
NOW PLAYING I

THROUGH SAVAGE
AFRICA
To the rescue of Nina, V
Goddess of the Blacks. Wil
mals impede their progress.r
ard and hyena in death gra

Sellers Will Be Stationed"
State Street Section.

in

e j
f th

ary The Michigan- Audobon society'
es- will hold its twenty-seventh annual
ent meeting on June 5 and 6, at Bay
nts, City, Mich.

of studer
and a ft

ac-

,Leu1lar
ight dur-
neeting of
led at any
mts or by

Included in the program will be
lectures and talks by various mem-
bers of the bird society, motion
pictures, hikes, and luncheons.
Local representatives in charge'
of the progra'm are Geneva Smithe,
recruit director, Prof. Harry W.j
Hann, of the Zoology department,
and Prof. T. L. Hankinson, of the
University museums.
Judge Fry Fines Two
on Misconduct Charge

The American Legion combined
with the local American Legion
auxiliary will hold its annual poppy
sale Saturday. The money raised
will be used entirely for welfare
work among needy veterans, and
Legionnaires will do all the work,
including the actual selling of the'
poppies.
The poppies are made by army
veterans at the hospital located at
Camp. Custer and are then pur-
chased by the Legion at four cents
each. From making and selling
poppies, the -veterans earn a small
amount of money for their own use.
Authorities have ordered 12,000
for sale next Saturday in Ann Ar-
bor. Last year, 8,000 were ordered
and at 3 o'clock in the afternoon
the supply was exhausted.
Poppy sellers will be stationed on
State street and throughout the
locality of the campus. The head-
quarters for the campaign is locat-
ed at 113 South Main street.

THE WILD "JUJU"
Drums of "Juju" witchcraft set
tribe in blood-lust frenzy. The
escape. Boat almost upset when
wounded alligator attacls it.

N

s

Tamale
Hart-
breaker',,,
He loved to fight-
and fought to love.
WARNER BROS.
Present

awards th
journalism
rof. JohnI
ism depar
rofesso
Prdav -

he
m,
T.,

.t- Pleading guilty to charges of be-
r ing drunk and disorderly yester-
day, .Louis Elfring, 553 S. Fourth
w street, was fined $10 and costs and
ig city fees amounting to $8.20 by
ss Judge Bert E. Fry. Arraigned on
a the same charges, Frank Hewitt,
to R. F. D. 6, likewise paid a fine of
$10 and costs.

CRUELEST WOMAN IN.
AFRICA
Beautiful white girl raised by c
nibals. She rules black tribe w
bestial cruelty. Arrival cif wh
men. The escape with White G
dess!

U'

* QUALITY.
Sporting Goods a
our stock before you
f the lines we car

your old clothes to 115 East Ann Street

QQUALITY. S
R 0
ok over
re some
Equip-
Croquet
Pitching

11

good price. Times are hard,

THE BIG GUN O
WAR COMEDIES I
.WARN ER0S~f.redt

sell your old

t right prices. Lo
buy. Following a
ry.

fAY WRAY
VICTOR VARCONI
CHARLES JUOILS
NATALIE
MOORHEAO

I

.. --i -4

D. MORDSKY

Fishing Tackle, Golf and Tennis
merit, Base Balls, Bats, and Gloves,t
Sets priced from $2.00 to $4.50. P
Shoes, set of 4 at $1.50 per set.

Bombshells of laugh-
ter! Explosions of joyI
A sweeping barrage of
howls and screamsi

Reduced Fares
lcoration Day,
e-way fare for round trip
S within the States of Illinois, Indiana, Ohio,
lso to Buffalo, N. Y., Niagara Falls, N. Y., ,
T1nsv o K:vm- St nic M- rh..grl .tnn

I

JUNGLE WAR
Never before seen on any screen!
The battle of the lions! Man
against beast. The oluningr lion
speared with pointed stick runs
amiick!

f'

Golf Balls, 3 for $1.00, 40c,,50c and 75c
each. Tennis Balls 25c, 40c and 50c each.
Tennis Racquets 75c up to $7.50. A Special
Golf Set including 4 Chrome Irons, Driver
and Bag, 56.75.
When in need of Hardware
See Fischer's.

wilk
Harry Langdon
and
BEN LYON

:fh $axLdest
Rio Grade

ADDED

WHITE M
'Nina learns to
frs..t les.nn:.s

i am

iI l

,11

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