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May 21, 1931 - Image 1

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-21

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7 ED

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EDITED AND MANAGED BY STUDENTS OF THE UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN

v

EIGHT PAGES

ANN ARBOR, MICHIGAN, THURSDAY, MAY 21, 1931

PRICE FIV7

( EJENGINEERING QUADRANGLE IS SCENE
L , OF ANNUAL SIGMA RHO TAU DEBATE

----r- -.-PRICE F__V

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'irU
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.I

e Public

'HUBER TO PRESIDE\(
AT THIRD TRIENNIAL
President of Alumni Association
Board to Head Cleveland
Gathering Friday.
ROBINSON MAKES VISIT
Mrs. Garrett Deikema, Widow of
Ambassador to Holland,
Plans to Attend.

V

d air-
rplane
.d the
actur-

Scene of the annual outdoor stump debate of Sigma Rho Tau, Engi-
neering forensic society, held yesterday afternoon in the Engineering
quadrangle. Students taking part in the debate are shown above, argu-
ing the merits of the "Honor System," present method of giving exam-
inations in the Engineering college.'

ic'." These
ni B. Stout,
addressing
al society
the Union.
Clem in the
is not pri-
ng princi-
leasing the
desire for

SHONOR PLAN TOPI
OF STUMP DEBATE
Sigma Rho Tau Meets in Annual
Outdoor Contest; Will Face
Ypsi Normal Tonight.

nice ad-
possi-
but the
a -thing

- I

the fu-
automo-
of rich
ohtamis

Sigma Rho Tau, engineering for-
ensic society, last night held its
annual outdoor Stump debate in
the Engineering quadrangle. The
subject was the "Honor System." In
the no-decision contest, the af-
firmative was upheld by Eric Som-
mers, '34E, J. R. McNitt, '33E, J., M.
Comar, '33E, G. L. Strehl, '31E, and
'Leo H. Brown, '31E. Those men on
the negative team were B. D.

Ruth Nichols to Hop
Atlantic Within Week
JERSEY CITY, N. J., May 20.-(P)
-Ruth Nichols will take .off on her,
solo flight across the Atlantic with-
in a week, Col. Clarence D. Cham-
berlin, her aeronautical adviser
said today.
Miss Nichols will take off from
Droyer's Point Air Field, Jersey City,
and leave the American continent
9,t Harbor Grace, Newfoundland.
She expects to fly to Croydon Field,
England, or beyond.
FOUN PtNsER CAMP
Rescue Party Discovers Remains

Dr. G. Carl Huber, president of
the board of directors of the Alum-
ni association and dean of the
Graduate school, will preside at the
third Triennial alumni meeting to
be held Friday and Saturday of this
week, in Cleveland.
Among the prominent alumnae
delegates at the meeting will be
Mrs. Garrett J. Diekema, widow of.
the late ambassador to Holland,
and Regent Esther M. Cram.
Seattle Secretary Here.'
The secretary of the Alumni club
of Seattle, M. J. Robinson, '04, is
in Ann Arbor for a few days on
his way to the meeting inCleve-
land. Seattle has one of the larg-
est University of )dichigan clubs.
The delegate/from Joliet, Ill., to
the meeting is planning to arrive
by plane, and the Detroit delega-
tion of 20 men are planningat
present to charter a plane to carry
them down to the Triennial.
Murfin Will Attend.
Among the other prominent
alumni who will be present at the
meeting are Regent James O. Mur-
fin, Elmer 3. Ottaway and " Mason
P. Rumney, formerpresidents of
the Alumni association, Emory J.
Hyde, junior vice president of the
Retail Credit company, Judge Har-
vey E. Ake, of Canton, O., and Den-
nis P. Quinlan, assistant to the
chief co-ordinator of the federal
co-ordination service.
Among the delegates from Ann
.Arbor.are Dr. Huber, Dean John R.
Effinger, of the literary school,
Dean Henry M. Bates, of the Law
school, Dean Herbert C. Sadler, of
the engineering school, Wilfred B.
Shaw, director of alumni relations,
and T. Hawley Tapping, general
secretary of the Alumni association.

PAINTED DEMONS
SEIZE CAPTIVES
BY MIGHTY OAK
Listen to this tale of romance,
Tale ,pf Indian wariors bold-
In the early moon of greenleaves
Came they forth the stoics val-
iant;
Forth they romped to paleface
wigwam,
Wigwam once of friend Great
Chief,
Paleface -mighty among his kind;
Came he forth to take their token
Of the warpath they would tread.'
Than to the mighty oak of Tap-
pan \
Dashed the screaming, yelling
redmen;
To the tree of Indian legend ,
When the white man pale and
trembling
Stood around the mighty oak;
Warriors choice of paleface na-
tion,
Choice of tribe to run the'gaunt-
let.
Down the warriors, painted dem-
ons,
Swooped and caught their prey
like 'eagles,
Loud the war cry stirred the still-
ness.
As they seized their hapless cap-
tives,
Forth they bore them to their,
wigwam
There to torture at their pleasure.'I
There they ate around the glow-
ing bonfires,
Heard the words of mighty wis-
dom,
Smoked the pipe of peace and
friendship.

Baseball Team Wins
From Ypsilanti 4-1
Michigan's Varsity baseball
team defeated Ypsilanti yester-
day, 4 to 1, with Kiegler and
Compton on the mound. Coach
Fisher used most of the squad
in the game in an effort to give
them a chance to show their
ability..Michaelis was the oppos-
ing pitcher but',the lefthander
was not so effective as when lie
defeated Western State in a 15
inning game.
George Voigt, foremost Amer-
ican amateur golfer, was elimin-
ated in the fifth round of the-
British Amateur championship
by Syd Roper one up. Voigt had
advanced to the fifth round by
winning from Bernard Darwin in
the morning match. This re-
moves all the foreign threats
from the tourney.
Minnesota defeated the Iowa
baseball team yesterday; 4 to 2,
as Illinois nosed out the Chicago
tennis team, 5 to 4.
(Complete Sports on Pages 6 & 7)
WIMDTNTO PRODUCE

Decision
Blow

Senate Group De
to Return PI
to House.
MEASURE TO

A.

FINANCE COMMITTEE- REFUSES
BRUCKER REQUEST TO REY1 EETDMl'1x U iY

LANSING, May 2
death blow wasp dea
proposals to reduce t
the University of M5
Michigan State colle
mill tax.
The senate finance
which hadabeen ask
Wilber M. Brucker 1
the once-defeated Ca
decided not to report
senate. This action me
versity will receive a
$5,060,000 from the rr
Callaghan bill would
the income to $4,662,00
similarly have limited
lege's income.
The bills were pa
house, but the senate a
to the committee with
'standing that they wo
Governor Brucker \
in a conference with
tives of the committee
to do what they cnul

C

Thus there came to Michigamua;
Prof.- Henry C. Anderson, of the
engineering department, Prof. Rob-
ert A. Campbell, treasurer of the
University, Harry S. Benjamin. '32,
Norman J. Daniels, '32Ed, Hugh R.
Conklin, '32E, Carl S. Forsythe, '32,
William E. Hewitt. '3_ rt nT

Play Prodi
Four

so held at the meet-
Each contestant was
autes in which to re-
aore anecdotes. The

i.,

BERLIN, - May

I Fo
I tion

Arctic
illus-

rigors have claimed anc
trious explorer and. sci.en
Word rebeived heret
the body of Prof. Alfred
er, head of the German
to central Greenland,

to be the bet-
velopment of
ese lines," he
f the greater
aveled, more#
e air-minded-
n general. A
to leave the
welcomes the
hese reasons.
taken in the
op the right
ae individual

held next Wednesday in the Union.
At that time- he will receive the
annual award of the Associated
Technical Societies of Detroit as
well as the musical stein presented,
by the speech society.
The debating teams of the socie-
ty will meet Ypsilanti Normal col-
lege here in room 311 West Engi"-
neering building and at Ypsilanti
in the Little theatre tonight. The
home team will be composed of
Sommers, Strehl, and Jorge J. Ji-
menez, '33E. The subject will be
,"Resolved, that compulsory unem-
ployment insurance should be
adopted."
CREDITCOMPANIES

Present.
y, '31E, toast-
et, introduced
vening. In ad-
John S. Wor-
,tion engineer-
e on "Co-ordi-
," and Prof. E.
ronautical de-
t talk for the
f the society,
last night, in-1
rs, '31E, presi-}
mmons, '33E,
d Palmer, '32E,
an E. Knapp,
s of the Glid-
are Elgin O.
rt; Harold H.
Lary; Norman
rer; and Ben-
flight man-

today that
L. Wegen-
expedition
had been

found by a rescue party dispelled
the last lingering hopes that he
would be found alive.I
Missing since Nov. 1 when hel
started out with only a native.
companion for his base on the
western edge of the Greenland ice
cap-a journey of about 250 miles
-Dr. Wegener's body was found 93
miles from his central camp at Ei -
mitte, his starting point.
The Sociey nor the Relief of
German. Science received a radio-
gram stating that Wegener's body
was found by the relief expedition
buried in the snow directly beneath
a pair of skis which previously had
been discovered.
Relief was expressed that he had
not frozen to death but had died
of heart trouble since thxe body was.
wrapped in furs and personal be-
longings had been removed, pre-
sumably by his comrade, Rasmus.
Prof. Alfred Wegener headed a
German expedition into Greenland
last year and had' not been heard
from since November, when he
started with one Eskimo and one;
sled from his base camp for the,
west coast.
Last week, the relief expedition
found the sled and the explorer's
skis. Hope for his safety then was
abandoned.
Wegener's companions, Profs.
Georgi, Loewe and Sorge, were
found by the relief expedition on
the central ice cap where the party
maintained its station.

;l

d r.1
_r

Hutzel; Candidate Is
Unopposed.

late Bulleins
(BV Assoc'*afd ?rcss)
Vdncsday, May 20, 1931.
(SON- Michigan State pris-°
i a new record populationj
7 Wednesday and, with only
ant cells, officials were won-
what to do with 76 prison-
aiting admittance from quar-

REHBERG SELECTED0
WORKS BOARD-HEAD0
Body Elects Successor to Titus

Would Provide Financial Relief
for European Farmers;
Delegates Assent.
GENEVA, May 20.--P()-A scheme
designed to relieve distress of Eu-
ropean farmers, involving organ-
ization of an international agricul-I
tural-ciedit company which would,
lend money to needy growers and
take as security mortgages on their
farm property, was approved to-
night by the pan-European com-
mission.
j Hailed as the "first child" of the
commission's labors for the eco-
nomic reconstruction of Europe,
the project received the support of
a majority of representatives !of
European members of the 'League'
of Nations, but the voice of Rus-
sia was lifted in dissent.
Under the proposal, 'an interna-
tional credit company would be
launched with paid-in capital of
$5,000,000, and it would be author-
ized to borrow $50,000,000 in the
open market.
The plan will be embodied in -a
draft convention to be presented
to the council of the League of Na-
tions for approval and then opened
for signature.
By it the commission hopes to
decrease operating expenses, whichl

Succeeding Titus F. Hutzel, Er-
nest Rehberg was elected president
of the Board of Public Works last
night. No other names were brought
forward to oppose Rehberg.
Meeting as a committee of the'
whole, the Common council decid-
ed that it is impossible to do away
with the extra assessments on late
taxes this year since it is contrary
to the city charter, and the matter
was dropped. This movement to-
wards the elimination of fines on
late taxes is in keeping with a state
policy which originated on account
of the present business depression.
The suggestion that wages of the
members of the water commission
be reduced was informally voted
down when it was shown that the
present commission is efficient be-
cause two competent engineers are
employed on it; and that these mien
and consequently the efficiency
might be lost if wages were lowered.

.j. oc , c , ivan u. Smitn,
'32Ed, John A. Tompkins, '32, Rich-
ard L. Tobin, '32, and Howard T.
Worden, '32.
Soviet Union Approves
Quota Plan for Wheat
LONDON, May 20.-(AP)-The Rus-
sian delegation to the world wheat
conference today indicated that the
Soviet Union would favor a "quota
plan" of Poland and the Danube
countries as a solution of the world
wheat problem, rather than the
proposal of Samuel R. McKelvie, of
the American contingent, for re-
striction of acreage.
Exposition of the Russian posi-I
tion created a minor impasse in
the conference.
The Americans have repeatedly
voiced opposition to any quota plan
or international export restrictions,
on the ground it would be against
sound marketing polciies. Observers
do not believe this attitude will be{
changed.
Proposed Revision Will Place
Selections on Merit Plan;
Applications Few.
Rejection or approval of changes
proposed in the revision of the
constitution of the Oratorical asso-
ciation will be made at a meeting
at 4:15 o'clock this afternoon, Law-,
rence E. Hartwig, '31, president, said
last night..
At the same time, the financial
tpolicyof the association will be dis-
cussed, Hartwig said. It is not
known just what steps will be taken
at today's meeting.
The proposed revised constitu-
tion is the result of a reorganization
of the association, a step which
eliminates the selection of officers:
by all-campus elections and puts,
the choice of president, vice-presi-
dent, and secretary on the merit
plan.
As a result of the small number
of applications which have been
received hy the sneech denartment s

Windt announced yesterday.-These
are: "Swamp M u d" by Harold
Courlander, '31; "Gin Joint" by
Hobert Skidmore, '32; "The Well"
by Richard Humphreys, '31; and
"The Blue Anchor" by the same au-{
thor.
' The first three, all one-act plays,
will be. presented together tomor-
row night at the new Laboratory
theatre; "Blue Anchor," which isJ
a short. five-act drama, will be giv-
en Saturday night.
"Swamp Mud" is an expression-
istic play of Negro life. "Gin Joint"
is a technical extravaganza with a
cabaret setting. "The Well" is a
mediaeval f a r c e treating on -a
faithless wife, and "The Blue An-
chor" deals with Revolutionary war
happenings in the manner of the
modern comedy.
Final decision on the award-win-!
ning plays will be render Saturday
night. The judges: are Thomas H.
Dickinson, author and critic; Paul
Osborn, playwright, who is noted
for "The Vinegar Tree"; and Dan-
iel L. Quirk, president of the Drama
League of America.

UNIVERSITY PAPER HITS AT FACULTY
INTERFERING IN OUTSIDE ACTIVITIES.

After the twc
which students a
the ,yearbooks, all
will be sold, he 'h
havebeen lost,d
obtained at the c
building.
BATONK
IN NEW YI

Record Crowd Hears
Historic Senior Sing,
One of the largest crowds ever to
attend a "Senior Sing"' was present
last night at Hill auditorium. It is
estimated that the attendence was
more than 3,000.'
The "Midnite Sons' quartet was
unable to take part in the programl
due to the absence of one of its
members. The varsity band was
present, however, and played the'
overture and the marches. The glee
club added to the program by sing-:
ing several selections.
Student Hit by Auto
Conined to Infirmary
Myron Gerson, '34L, today was
confined to the Health Service in-
firmary due to injuries received in i
an accident which took place on'
S. State street Wednesday after-
noon.
Gerson was struck by a car driven
south on State -street by Lloyd
Lebice, 1711 Abbot street. Although.
X-rays failed to show any injuries,
Gerson will be kept at the'infirm-
i, ru fn, nhzaf. inn

I
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Famous Ca
to End
Melai

NEW YORK, May 20.
Barton, ironical caric
himself to death in t
apartment early today
hind him a 500-word 4
ing of melancholia ,
over failure to apprec
Monterey, his former
Barton called Miss IV
the wife of' Eugene
playwright, "the on;
ever loved."
"Everyone who ha,
and who hears of this
different hypothesis tc
plain why I did it," v
"Practically all the h
be dramatic and comp
,"Since early childb
suffered from melane
for the 'past five year
to show definite sympi
ia-hdepressive-insanity.
from house to housE
country to country in
effort to escape myse
"In particular my re:
ter over my failure t
my beautiful lost and
the oiily woman I eve
whom I respect and e
all the rest of the hum-
is the one person w11
saved .me had I been
did her best. I do h
will understand what
was and forgive me a
"MNnne +hinn is r.

North Carolina "Tar Heel' Also
Conducts Investigation of
Drinking on Campus.
(Special to The Daily)
CHAPEL HILL, N. 'C., May 20.-
Two lengthy articles in the Daily
Tar Heel, University of North Caro-
lina publication, one entitled "John
Barleycorn Is Supreme at North
Carolina University," and the other
called "Carolina No Longer Light of
Liberalism For South," made their
appearance in the current issue,
aronine cnnsiderahl enmnent.

"All in all," it read, "drinking on
the campus is more spontaneous'
than habitual. The student at tboe
university may be described as hav-
ing no desire to drink continually,
but every desire to drink on festive
occasions."
In the second article, the news-
paper attacked the administration
of the Universityin the interest of
"student control of student activi-
ties." The principal centers of this
attack were the "cut" system,,the
athletic council. the sudents' en-*

-Dale Teed, 15-year-I
Sheriff and Mrs. Guy
d Wednesday in Little-
hen he attempted to
e from a capsized sail-
other boys in the sail-
,a p~

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