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May 20, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-20

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

CAN DAIEY'

ost
4vver ;

Aid to

K Student

EYESTRAIN
Emory W. Sink, IV. D.

ffi

That

amed for
recent
trying to
e path tor
of Labor IAsociated Press oto
rkers and George A. Hastings,
y general Prominent New York specialist,
ould be a who was appointed administrative
t reached aid to President Hoover recently.
try in the He will be connected with child"
President health work and development of
social agencies.
day there
L of that
age levels
He added
ould be aT
.nd would
and more T IC S H N I

Will Consider Further Revision
of Its Constitution at
Early Meeting.

Good eyesight is a priceless pos-
session. Of the five special senses-
hearing, seeing, feeling, tasting,
and smelling-that of sight is the
most important, for probably nine-
tenths of one's knowledge reaches
the brain though this sense.
One often remarks that seeming-
ly more people are obliged to wear
glasses than formerly and that
quite likely the eye is becoming
more defective as civilization ad-
vances. However, when one consid-
ers the demands made upon the
eye by close application and con-
tinued use in the several trades,
professions, and school work, he
learns that many young people
wear glasses not for the reason of
improving the sight, but for the
purpose of relieving the eye Wsmcles'
of strain imposed by daily routine,
work.
Many students, although they
have apparently normal vision, ex-
perience considerable eyestrain fol-
lowing close application to, their
studies. The symptoms of eyestrain
are redness and watering of the
eyes, blurring of the print, drowsi-
ness, fatigue, headache, and even'
sore lids and styes. Properly fitted
glasses as advised by a physician
usually relieve these symptoms, not
by curing the eye condition but by,
compensating for the musculaL ef-
fort used in prolonged study. With-
out such care the student may tire
easily, feel sleepy, have a tendency
to lose interest, fail to concentrate
fully, and even develop headache
which prevents further use of the
eyes.
Thire are several conditions
which are associated with the de-
velopment of eyestrain, such as
p olonged use of the eyes, faulty
printing, faulty lighting, glare,
squint, 'diseases, and defects in the
focusing mechanism of the eyes.
Faulty illumination and glare arnd
very common causes of eyestrain
among students. Direct illumina-
tion causes considerable strain. The I
most important feature essential
for good lighting is to guard thea
position of the light, so that it does
not shine directly into the eyes, or,
is not reflected from. the printed
page into the eyes, as glare. Por
general purposes, 'the best position
for the light is somewhat above
KETS iIRE ERVAIO E
KUEBLER TRAVEL BUREAU
B1 L UPON $T."ANN ARBORt, M -ICH t gPHON( 6
AEj'S O E N' RAE IN ,URAN4E AG NC Y.

Heti __ FLOTO DISTRIBUTE
Health "
and behind the reader's head.
Defects in the focusing mechan- jAviator Will Fly Over Country
ism of the eye are responsible for to Scatter Copies of
eyestrain and defective vision.r-n
When the -defect is slight there Propaganda.
may be no apparent loss in vision, Planning to attract attention to
since the focusing muscles are able an exhibit of war relics to be held
to compensate, but after prolonged in the Armory beginning May 25,
use, fatigue follows. If the defect Leonard Flo, of the Ann Arbor air-
is very marked, the muscles cannot port, will fly over Washtenaw coun-
compensate, and often there is lit- ty and scatter from a plane exact
tle eyestrain although there may be copies of a piece of war propogan-
considerable loss in visual acuity. da that German aviators scattered'
In many cases temporary relief is over the Allied trenches during the
obtained through resting the eyes World war.
by closing the lids or looking off at Accompanyig Flo will be Adolph
a distance or minto a darkened room Schneeberger, World War veteran,
for a few minutes.. .owho will assist in distributing the'
Many defects m the focusing circulars, which are to be thrown;
mechanism are compensated by from the plane as it swoops down
wearig properly fitted 1e n s e s, in duplication of the feat of Ger-!
which perform the work of making man aviators at the time of the dis-
a suitable focus. In cases of eye-the original handbill.
strain, glasses usually relieve the Collecting war souvenirs from
condition merely by compensation various private collections includ-
without apparent improvement ininthsofMyrHWrtNw
visual acuity. Glasses as a rule do ing those of Mayor H. Wirt New
not cure the eye defect, but they kirk, the American Legion, harry
usually prevent the condition from Arora V er' Wuil, whi is
becoming more severe, Arbor Veterans council, which is
Accidents to the eyest are not sponsoringthe exhibit, has been
infrequent among students. Foreign able to gather together a quantity
bodies in the eyes, such as small of weapons and other relis 1
,emery dust or particles of, steel, every description.
emey daustor rtiles opteels' The exhibit includes the battle
may cause serious complications, flag of "Mad Anthony" Wayne, heroeyar
Acid burns in the eye are not rare, la of hed Reoltony" way, which
Exposures to intense light have oc- of the Revolutionary war, which
curred. In all these ,cases, suitable has been brought from Toledo un-
glasses or goggles should be worn der special escort for the occasion.
to prevent injuries to the eyes.
One should give special consider- Pearson Gives Speech
ation to the care of the eyesight, on Statistics Science
for upon it much of one's success ___
in later life depends. Dr. Eagon S. Pearson, senior lec-
turer in applied statistics of the
Pharmacists to Hold I biometric Laboratories of the Uni-
, versity of London, spoke on "Statis-
Recognition Banquet I tics on Research" yesterday after-
noon in the Natural Science audi-
Recognition of students who have torium.
attained high scholarship in the Dr. Eagon stressed p'articularly
pharmacy school will be made to- - applications of statistics to prac-
night at 8:30 o'clock at the an- tical problems, emphasizing the fact
nual all-pharmacy banquet inhthat statistical problems should be
Lnu treated with mathematics rather
League. than as mathematics.
Three awards will be given to out- He pointed out that it was fre-
standing students in pharmacy, quently far more important to have
Prof. Clifford C. Glover, secretary an adequate knowledge of the field
of the College of Parmacy, said directly concerned with the observ-
of heColeg ofPl~arac, sided data than the mathematical
yesterday. formula employed. The combina-
Dr. W. B. Hinsdale will be the tion of the two he characterized as!
principal speaker. the ideal situation.

°''
,,,

II ANN ARBOR NEW:

T'
i;
a,
IJ
S
l
4'.
It
1, 1

WILL OPEN BIDS
ON WATER WORKS
Bids for the $325,000 Ann Arbor
water works bonds will be opened
at 10 o'clock Monday morning, city
clerk Fred Perry announced yes-
terday. The bonds will be issued
June 1, he said, according to pres-
ent plans.
The money obtained by this
means will be used, it has been dg-
cided tentatively, for the construc-
tion of a reservoir costing about
$125,000, with $145,000 for trunk,
line mains, $45,000 for dead-end
mains, and the remainder for en-
gineering fees, contingent expen-
ses, and incidentals.

I

City Bodies to Meet Five Arrested, L
Two city bodies will meet in the' Arrested yesterday near
City hall tonight. The Board of C. railroad tracks for beinj
Public Works will convene to elect and disorderly, five men v
a new president, while the Com- en a chance to leave tow:
mon council will hold a commit- before charges are prefer
tee of the whole session.
The public works election is ne--Pastor Dead in C
cessitated by the expiration of the
term of Titus W. Hutzel, incum-
bent. The council will consider Rev. L. H. Stevens and
eliminating fees on back taxes paid Clack, of Clinton, are dea
before July 1. the car in which they were
Ing home from Petersbu
Two Injured, in Crash Monday night was struck b
. ___bash freight train near Bri
In a collision Monday at the cor- Stevens, who was pastor
ner of Forest and Geddes Mrs. E. CltodistwaEpisc pal
A. Current, Farmland, Indiana, re-aClcon awasrklleri
ceived severe bruises about the and Clack, a rural mail car
mouth and a possible back injury yesterday morning in St.
when her car tipped over. Frank hospital.
McLaughlin sustained a badly CORNELL UNIVERSI'Y-
bruised wrist while Mrs. Ed Mc- women recently entertainec
Laughlin, and Hazel Kreil who students from Elmira, S
were riding in the car received Rochester, and Smith colle
minor injuries. Margaret Current~ "play day" consitig of
was the driver of the car in whichI letic proram
TYPEWRITER t _ .-

e

Mrs. Current was riding.
injuries were treated. a tl
verstiy hospital.
-The cars of Fred Harvey,
and J. Murphy, 9 Nichols P
were slightly damaged whe:
vey backed into the curt
turning his car around.
Loses Valuable Ri
Three rings, one of whic
valued at $300, were stolen
the home of Dr. H. Gordor
204, 200 N. State. Police h
clues as to the identity of th
gular or. the manner in whi
obtained the rings.

piations Dy hisI
e attributed to

isinesses. The larger Further revision of the constitu-
e not reduced but are tion of the Oratorical association
eirly well" to insist- and discussion of the financial pol-
level be maintained, icy will be considered at a meeting
to be held either Thursday or Fri-
y had not been told day, Lawrence E. Hartwig, '31,
t the statement o president of the association, said
ration of Labor that yesterday.
be justified in strik- The proposed revision of the con-
I wage cuts. Nor did stitution is the result of a reorgan-
he announcement by ization of the association, foremost
ouncil of the federa- of which is the selection of officers
ain bankers and in- by the merit system and elimina-
re planning general tion of an all-campus election in
making the choices.
Selection of a majority of speak'-
ses Reported. er§ forthe 1931-32 lecture series
e had heard uncon- will be made within a few weeks,
of general wage de- Hartwig said. The lecturers will
igh major railroads be chosen by the lecture course
hey contemplated no committee.I
yges. Applications from students for
abinet member was the position of president, vice pres-
statement, Fred C. ident, and secretary of the asso-
g chairman of the ciation will be received by the
aergency committee speech department until 4 o'clock
lent, held Green's Tuesday afternoon, May 26. Any
t presage widespread student who is interested in public
'es. He did predict,' speaking may become a candidate
Donal labor disturb- for any one of the positions, Hart-
pression continued. wig said.

.r
a
l

_..

REPAIRING
All makes of machines.
Our equipment and per-
So n n el are considered
among the best in the State. The resuli
of twenty years' careful building.
0. D. MORRIL L
314 South State St. Phone 6615
P EBBLES
KILLINS GRAVEL
COMPANY
Telephone 7112

. _
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t .i

Technical Illk

COMF
ILLUS'I
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PLETE DRAF
SERVICE
Specializing in

FRATERNITY JEWELRY PARTY FA
* AR CADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY
JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcade

VORS

I1

TECHNICAL
TECHNICAL
Dial 22194

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