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May 16, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-16

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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........ U .P.. IL ... Lh
SCHDOL'S HISTORY
TOLD IN BULTIN
Founded To Render Serviced
for The State;' Building
Erected in 1908.
NAME CHANGED IN 1927
Curricula Altered During Years;
First Session Required
Six Months.
By Stanley Arnheim, '34

Michigan's dental school was the
first to become part of a state uni-
versity and the second to become
part of any university, according to
the school's bulletin.
Known until 1927 as the College
of Dental Surgery, it was then
changed to the School of Dentistry
in conformity with the policy of the
University which designates as
schools those of its units which re-
quire for admission at least two
years of college work.
Founded for Service.
Contrary to the traditions of the
time as set down by physicians and
educators, the School of Dentistry
was established at the University,,
indicative of the "policy of . this
University to render service to the
State."
The first location of the school
was on the north side of campus in
a house formerly occupied by a
professor. It has made three moves
since then, the last to the present
location. As the school increased
in enrollment it moved to larger
quarters on the south side, then
back again to the north side, and
in 1908 "into a new building de-
signed and constructed to furnish
such necessary facilities as did not
already exist in the University." In
1923 the demand for education in
this line was so great further ex-1
pansion was undertaken.
Curriculum Took One Year.
Lectures and technical and clin-
ical instruction covering two six-
month periods comprised the first
curriculum. This was extended to
two sessions of nine months each
in 1884 and in 1889 it was length-'
ened to three nine-month sessions.
A' four-year curriculum, inaugurat-
ed -in 1901, was discontinued two
years later because- other dental=
schools -and the dental profession
did not support the movement. The
four-year curriculum was revised
and adopted in 1917.
Changes in many of the courses
have been made since that date,
the curriculum extended to five
years in 1921. Many courses, neces-
sary for graduation from the dent-
al school, are not 'offered by that
institution, but must be gained in
.other schools of the University,
thus giving the students greater re-
lationships.

PRESIDENT OF SENATE DEFEATS
BRI AND FOR FRENCH PRESIDENCY
"1
Paul DAssociated Proe Photo
P Doumer, shown above, president of the French senate, was
elected thirteenth presid~ent of his country, over Aristide Briand, foreign
miister and pre-elcction favorite. Briand resigned his post after being7
Pal~ou es ow^b ve rsdet o t eFe ch snte a

ARHMY PLANES FLY
TO DAYTON FIELD
Foulois Directs Maneuvers; Bad
Weather Delays Ships From
Eastern Appalachians.
FAIRFIELD, DAYTON, O., May
15.-(AP)-Hundreds of army air-
planes hopped off from fields with-
in a radius of 300 miles of this
army air corps center early today
for concentration for the annual
army maneuvers.
The more than 670 ships reached
scattered stations throughout the
middle west Thursday night and
took off today at designated times
in order that there would be no
confusion in their arriving at
Wright Field and Fairfield.
Upwards of sixty lanes arrived
here Thursday and the remainder
were to ground here not later than
noon Saturday.
Bad weather east of the Appa-
lachian mountains held up some
ships, but Brig. Gen. Benjamin
Foulois in charge of the maneu-
vers, said he would be satisfied if
all arrived by noon Saturday.
Despite the fact that 672 planes
have been on the move from the
four corners of the country for the
past several days, reports of acci-
dents have been few. Four ships
were down in various parts of the
country Thursday. One nosed over
at South Euclid, near Cleveland,
and broke a, propellor.
A transport plane was down near
Waco, Tex., with a broken oil line,
another came down with a con-
necting rod burned out at Argyle,
Tex., and a fourth landed at Scott
IField, Ill. No one was hurt in forc-
ed landing, although all the lanes
carried passengers.
SELFRIDGE FIELD, Mt. Clemens,
May 15.-(1P)-With Maj. Gerald E.
:Brower in command, 82 planes of
the First Pursuit group, stationed
at Selfridge Field took off in form-
ation flight at 7:20 a. m. today for
Dayton, O., where they will join
other contingents of the army air
farce in the annual air maneuvers.
Chicago Criminologists
Form Crime Academy
CHICAGO, May 15.-(p)-The
Chicago Academy of Criminology,
d ips d t n rciron

_ --

hodiiays Radio ]Porm
(Eastern Standard Time)
In a coast-to-coast network of and "The River and Me." In addi-
Columbia stations, Ted Husing will tion, Ruth Roye, musical comedy
bring to the eager racing enthusi- and vaudeville headliner, will be
asts a word-picture of the Ken- heard on the program with Miss
tucky Derby, this afternoonat 5:45 Markoff, singing "Ten Cents a
o'clock. On the National Broad- Dance" and "Roll on Mississippi."
casting lanes through s t a t i o n s
WGY, WTAM, and WENR, at the Lovers of the peculiar rhythm of
same time, Clem McCarthy, aided Spanish music will find a welcome
by Graham McNamee, will describe program in that of Los Conquista-
the transcribing events. Micro- dores an orchestra from Spain
phones will be set up in the track, which plays music of a type seldom
the paddock, and in the grand- ( heard on this side of the Atlantic.
stand to give the radio listeners I Coming from Spain only recently
some idea of the excitement and and making a hit in New York,
bustle of the world famous Ken- they were signed to appear on the
Lucky Derby. radio for the first time last Satur-

OKLAHI

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"The Baggage Coach Ahead,"
"Granny," "Whippoorwill," a n d
"T "o n T 1-- -, +.4 ..;1 I- su

Ehisie Schultzehnheim" will be the
songs featured by "Smiling Ed" Mc-
Connell' on his half-hour of old
songs tonight at 8 o'clock, over sta-
tions WXYZ, WKBW, WABC. He
will select several other tunes to
make up a program of true Ameri-
can folk songs.
Broadcasting twice a week, star-
ring in motion pictures, and mak-.
ing records hasn't satisfied Rudyt
Vallee. He is now rehearsing to ap-
pear in a lead role in the coming
George White's "Scandals," which
will open in New York in about a
month.
"Now You're in My Arms," a new1
fox-trot number by Morton Dow-
ney, will be sung by Lanny Ross,
"the Troubador of the Moon," to-
night at 11 o'clock. Other numbers
are "Song of the Hills" and "Reach-
ing for the Moon." The orchestra
accompanying the Troubador will
play for its part of the program
"Venetian Serenade" by Luzzatti.
Among the notables who will be
heard on the air next week, is Mar-
lene Dietrich, German actress, who
proved a sensation in the American
motion pictures, "Morocco," and
"Dishonored." Dorothea James,
musical comedy star, will sing.sev-
eral of the hitsrof the day in the
Vitality Personalities program on
the Columbia chain. Gypsy Markoff
will bring her piano-accordian to
the mike when she appears Thurs-
day, also on the Columbia channels.
Her numbers will be "Play Gypsy"
TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of machines.
Our equipment, and per-
s o n n el are considered
among the best in the State. The result
of twenty years' careful building.

day night. They come over stations
WGAR and WREN at 10:45 o'clock.
4:00-Peter Van Steeden and his orchestra--
WLW, WJZ
4:25-'-Baseball scores-WJR
5:00-Kentucky Derby-WFBL, WOKo
5:15-Saxophone quartet--WJZ
5:30-Smith Bellew and his orchestra-KWK,
WREN, WJZ
5:45-Description of Kentucky Derby-WGY,
WTAM, WENR
Lowell Thomas--WJZ, KDKA, WLW
6:30-Ted Lewis.and his Musical Clowns-
WWJ, WTAM, WGY
Armand Veosey and his Ritz Carlton
orchestra-WEAN, WLBW BWBCM
6:35-Final baseball scores-WJR
7:00-Webster Program featuring Webber
and Fields-WWJ, WTAM, WGY
7:30--"Silver Flute," wandering Gypsy -
WWJ, WGY, WEAF
7:45-Mary Charles with Nat Brusiloff-
WLBW, WFBM, WABC,
8:00--Harbor Lights, "The Grey Ghost"-
WJZ; WGAR
Erno Rae directing symphony orches-
tra-WWJ, WTAM, WLW
"Smiling Ed McConnell" - WXYZ,'
WKBWV, WABC
5:30-Attorney General William Mitchell -
WLBW, WEAN, WOKO
9:00-B. A.'Rolfe anl his orchestra-WWJ,
WTAM, WGY:
H ank- Simmons' Show Boat, "Oliver
Twist"-WFBL, WLBW, WEAN
"Cuckoo" burlesque skit-WJR, WGAR
9:45-Tony Cabooch-WXYZ. WBBM. WABC
10:0r-Slumber Music-WJZ, WGAR
Troubador of the Moon, Lanny Ross--
WEAF
Bert Lown and his Biltmore orchestra
-WLBW, WBCM, WABC
1O:30-Paul Tremaine and his orchestra--
WABC, WLBW, WBCM
10:45-Little Jack Little-WWJ, WTAM, WGY
Los Conquistadores-WREN, WGAR
11:00-Paul Whiteman and his orchestra--
WREN, WGAR, KYW
Jack Denny and his Montreal orchestra
-WEAN, WFBM, WABC
JackAlbin and his orchestra-WTAM,
WGY, WEAF
11:30-Charlie Agnew and his orchestra-
WGAR, WREN, KWK'
12:00-Ambassadors-WOW
Nighthawk Frolic-WDAF
12:30-R.K.O. St. Louis Theatre-KWK
12:45-Dance orchestra from Graystone ball-
roo m-WJ R
1:00-Dance orchestra-KOA
Midnight Merry-makers-KWK
Dance music-KFWB till 3 o'clock
WASHED, SCREENED
SAND-GRAVEL
ALL SIZES,
KILLINS GRAVEL CO.
CALL
7075, 7112 OR 21014

'

Governor Charges Violation
Anti-Trusf Laws; Firms
May Be Ousted.
OKLAHOMA CITY, May 15.-
- Nine Oklahoma public ut
companies faced possible ouster
confiscation of their properties
alleged violation of the state a
trust laws today.
Gov. W. H. Murray, in annot
ing plans for state action aga
the companies, predicted the u
mate result would be a fair gas :
and that it would be obtai
"several years quicker" than ur
present proceedings before the st
corporation commission.
Leon S. Hirsh, attorney who
peared against tlie Oklahoma Na
ural Gas corporation, one of
nine named by Murray in a r
hearing this week, was appoir
by the governor to file the suit;
state courts.
The companies against Wh
Murray directed Hirsh to file
are the Oklahoma Natural, Qu
ton Natural Gas corporation, Sot
western Natural Gas corporat
Muskogee Natural Gas, Inc., 'I
Okan Oil corporation, Oklaho
Natural Building Co., Tri-Uti
corporation, American Natural C
corporation and the Ozark Holc
Co.
Murray asserted "certain corp
ations" 'have violated state laws
creation of a monopoly, by 1
maintenance of unlawful rates;a
charges, and otherwise, "which a
have subjected such corporation
the cancelation and forfeiture
their licenses and charters a
right to do business in the si
and further subjected them to c
tain penalties, charges and for
tures to the state."
Record-Breaking
Values on
Distinctive New

caeieateci

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What's Going on

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THEATRES
Michigan-Lawrence Tibbet in
"The Prodigal" with Esther Ral-
ston, Roland Young, and Cliff Ed-
wards.
Majestic-"Young Sinners" with
Dorothy Jordan, Thomas Meighan,
and Hardie Albright.
Wuerth-Eddie Quillan in "Night
Work," and George Marion in "Man
To Man."
DANCES
Union-Don Loomis and his or-
chestra.
League-Del Delbridge and his
orchestra from 4 to 6 o'clock, and
Reuel Kenyon's League band in the
evening,
SPORTS
Tennis-Chicago versus Michigan
at 2 o'clock, Ferry field.
Golf--Detroit City college golf
team meets Michigan on the Uni-
versity course.

FASCIST LEADERS
STRIKE TQSCANINI
American Orchestra L e a d e r
Refuses to .Play Italian.
National Anthem.

2
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f

BOLOGNA, Italy, Ma
Arturo Toscanini, who
in the face Thursday
he refused to play the
tional anthem at a con
his way to Milan tot
been ordered to leave B
Fascist official.
When the conductor
the stage door of the
group of Fascists reque
play the anthem bec
Ciano, under-secretary
istry of the interior an(
law of Premier Mussoli
ter, was in the audienc
Toscanini refused, as
before, on the ground th
position is not "good n
delegation demanded t
consider, and when he
one of them struck him
him to return to his he

y 1.-{} -

night when
Fascist na-o
.crt, was on r

r

, etsuine to provide a multipea
ay, having proach to the problem of crime in
ologna by a all its aspects, was organized
Thursday night.
arrived at The sciences of neurology, psy-
theater a chiatry, psychology, sociology, path-
sted that he ology, toxicology were represented
ause Count at the first meeting, as well as the
in the min- law, crime detection and prison ad-
d father-in- ministration.
ini's daugh- Dr.' Edwin H. Sutherland of the
e. department of sociology, University
he has done of Chicago, was elected president,
Lat the com- and board, of directors was a ros-
nusic." The ter of leaders in criminological sci-
that he re- ences. It is the hope of its foun-
would not ders to make the academy the au-
and forced thoritative body on this subject in
otel. the midwest.

I

Fraternity
Jewelry
BURR
PATTERSON'S
Spring Sale
20% to 50 %.
Discount
603 Church Street

0. D. MORRILL'
South State St. Phone 6615

314

GENERAL
Hill Auditorium--Ruth
violinist, in the afternoon,
presentation of "Boris" at

Breton,
and the
night.

FES, Fl
T.

u

S OE-%i

ai":: .
}
tty . ,... '.; .

I

iliam a de W nshaw

Berkshire Hotel,
21 East 52nd Street,
New York.

T

BOO T 1tY
l educt .o s

Charles A. Sink, President School of Music,
Ann Arbor, Michigan.
My dear Mr. Sink:-

-N NALL -

Sport Shoes, Street an resShoes
WE MUST GREATLY REDUCE STOCK BEFORE COLLEGE CLOSES

$11.00 to $12.00
FLORSHEIMS.
Now
$9.69 & $8.89

$10.00 and $10.50
FLORSHEIMS
Now
$8.69 & $7.89

SELZ AND PACKARD SHOES
$7.00, $8.00, $9.00 and $10.00 Values
Cut to
$589, $6.49 and $7.89'

I have just received your announcement of this year's May Festival,
and I want to congratulate you again, as I do every year, on the wonderful
program you are to present to the good people of Ann Arbor. Every time
I think of your May Festival and your concert programs, I think, anew,
what a marvelous opportunity you give to Ann Arbor music lovers to
hear the very finest music that is available anywhere in the world. How any
resident of Ann Arbor could allow himself to miss a single one of your
programs has always been a mystery to me. It would cost not less than
$6o.oo for one season ticket to each of your Festival programs if- given in
New York, besides all the expense of taxis, railroads, buses, etc., and many
hours of time getting to and from the programs. But you offer the people
of Ann Arbor all these fine programs right at their- doors,,.so to speak, and
for a single fee for the whole six programs that is less than the fee for a
single program anywhere else in America. In fact, there is no other place
where such a Festival could be head at all. To hear all these fine artists
in any city would require a whole season of waiting between concerts.
Your array of artists this year surpasses, if possible, any array you
have offered in the .past, and your programs are exceptionally interesting.
The artists are all, or nearly all, so well known to Ann Arbor that there
is little to be said that would be new about them for every one of them
is an outstanding artist.
You are in great luck to be able to present Mme. Lily Pons, whose
singing has created a positive furor at the Metropolitan Opera House this
season, where it costs $12.00 to hear her in a single performance. No other
coloratura soprano has made such a sensation at the Metropolitan since
Patti and Melba adorned that stage. Her singing alone will be worth the
price of your whole season ticket. So, also, will be the playing of Paderew-
ski. This will most likely be the last opportunity to hear this great pianist
in America. Anyone in Ann Arbor who has not heard him, and who fails
to hear him this time, well, he will always have the lonely feeling that he
has missed something that belongs in his life's experiences; and everyone
who hear him will receive a musical baptism that will enrich his whole
existence. I could go on writing about the other artists on your list, for
every one richly deserve my high commendation, but space does not permit.
I often wonder, however, whether the good people of Ann Arbor appreciate

FLORSHEIMS for WOMEN
$10.50 to $12.00 Values
Cut to
$8.69 and $9.69

NEW SPRING STYLES FOR WOMEN
Formerly $7 to $10 SPECIAL!
Now 200 Pairs
589 -689789 Cut to

THEY ARE BUYING 2 AND 3 PAIRS AT THESE LOW PRICES

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