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February 24, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-02-24

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

w"TVAnAV. rrRR TTAR.V 24. 10.11

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ACTIVITY OF WOMEAIN WELOME!
IN RELIGIOUS WEEK
PROE IMPORTAN

Five Out of Nine on Committee
for Faculty Relations
Are Women.
CAUSE NEEDS SUPPORT
Committee for Student Contact
Includes Six Women in
Membership.
"Women have done as much in
each group of committees as men
have done," declared Miss Ellen
Gammack yesterday, in speaking of
Religious Emphasis Week, which
started yesterday and will continue
until March 1.
Miss Gammack's statement is
given proof in that five out of the
nine members on the committee
for faculty relations are women.
Roberta Reed, Lois Peoples, Geral-
dine Grover, Gertrude Cook, and
Katherine McMurray are serving on
this committee.
On the committee for student
contact six of the representatives
are women: Helen Cheever, Kather-
ine Wilcox, Ruth French, Kather-
ine Van Zoren, Bertha Howard, and
Jane Yearnd. This committee serves
as a connecting link between those
in charge of Religious Emphasis
Week and the students. Women in
each sorority house and dormitory
were appointed to inform the other
women in the group concerning the
proposed plans and to ask for their
cooperation.
Miss Gamack feels that it is not
too much to ask of an undergrad-
uate woman, who came to the Uni-
versity of Michigan to gain knowl-
edge and experience in every line,
to take one week from her four
years in which to study something
which concerns everyone. "It would
be a good idea," continued Miss
Gammack, "to ask everyone to
make a list of the things she did,
during the week andthen see just
how many of them were more im-
portant to her than a study of her
religion. I am afraid the result
would be rather disappointing."

}.t i 1

it

Sntramural
I... NEWS

II

Queen Victoria of Spain,
Who was rceted with an en-
husiastic welcome by the suppor-
ers of the monarchy when she re-
,urned to Madrid from London,
here she had been visiting her
pother
PLAA; [3A pL A
P H-P -- -
Dormitories and Soroities Will
Take Charge of Various
Plans for the nntA1 Penny Car-
nival, which is being given by the
Women's Athletic a s s o c i a t i o n
March 4, in Barbour gymnasium,
re nearing completion as the var-
Gous sororities and dormitories de-
ide on the booths they are taing.
A prize is being given for the most
attractive booth and the one which
takes in themost money.
One change this year is to be the
entertainment offered in Sarah
Caswell Angell hall. In former
years a vaudeville skit of some sort
has been given, but the only vaude-
ville this year will be given in the
booths. Barbara Braun, chairman
of booths says that the new plan 1
will be announced soon.
As in the past there will be a
shoe shining booth, a fish pond, a
manicuring booth, and one for sil-
houettes. Everything costs one
cent, from the time one enters to
the time of leaving.
FAMOUS WRITERS
REVEALMETHODS
Women Novelists Tell Working
Habits in 'Marix'. f
Working habits of some of the
most widely-known members of
Theta Sigma Phi are detailed in an
article in the February issue of
"Matrix," published by that society.
Fannie Hurst, the famous novel-
ist, writes for six hours each day,
because "a shorter period would
show too little accomplishment."
Her writing day begins at 9 o'clock
in the morning, after an early walk
through Central PFark with her
dogs. Miss Hurst is quoted as say-
ing: "There are no fixed rules you
can lay down about writing. All you
can do is write. The rest will take
care of itself. If you are filled with
the torment to write, you will have
to keep on writing."
Zona Gale does all her writing
by hand first and then copies it on
the typewriter, lnter having it re-
typed by an expert typist. Miss
Gale, when deep in composition,
does not wish to be disturbed for
any reason.
Temple Dailey is roported as say-
ing that her writing day extended
from 8 o'clock in tIe mornmg until
12:30 in the afternoon, beginning
immediately after breakfast. Usual-
ly she writes on her own typewriter,
but part of one novel she dictated
because of illness.

CALENDAR
Feb. 24-29.
1 :0-nnTuesdayn'
-AnnArbor Women
Club, Ball room, League build-
ing.
4:00-P a n-Hellenic meeting,
League building.
6:00-Martarboard, Cave
League building.
6:30--Businessand profession-
al Women's Club, League build-
ing.
6:30--Physics Department
nartv. Alumnae Room, League
buildmign.
7:00-Christian Science Serv-
ice, League Chapel.
8:00--German Club meeting,
League building.
8:00-Sigma Alpha Iota,
League building.
Wednesday
12:00-League of Women Vo-
ters, League building.
7:00-Theosophical S o c i e t y,
Committee room, League build-
ing.
7:30-Sigma Alpha Iota,
League building.
7:15-Delta Omicron meeting,
League building.
9:00-Social Study Club dance,
League building.
7:30-University Girls' G le e
Club, League building.
Thursday
2:30--W. C. T. U. meeting,
Lounge, League building.
7:30-Freshman Girls' G 1 e e
Club, League building.
7:30-Comedy Club presents
"Strait-Jacket," Lydia Mendel-
ssohn Theatre.
Friday
12:30-A. A. U. W. Internation-
al Relations committee, League
building.
6:00--L i n c o ln Consolidated
School faculty meeting, Alumnae
room, League building.
7:30--Stoic Society, L e a g u e
building.
9:30-W a s h t e n a w County
Teachers' m.e e t i n g, Ballroom
League building.
7:30-Comedy Club's "Straight-
Jacket," L y d i a Mendelssohn
theatre.
Saturday
2:00-University Girls' G le e
Club benefit bridge, Grand Ra-
pids room, League building.
6:00-Kappa Beta Pi meeting,
Leagu 2building.
6:00--Sigma Alpha Iota meet-
ing, League building.
7:00-Dinner Dance for the
Junior Class of the School of
Education, League building.
7:30-"Strait-Jacket," L y d i a
Mendelssohn Theatre.

Physical Education
Holds Opportunities
for Many Teachers
"As in all relatively new profes-
sions, physical education is full of
opportunities for leaders. The peoa
ple's attention is being drawn morej
and more towards athletics, thus
creating a greater demand for
teachers and directors in this field,"
said Miss Lauie Campbell, profes-
sor of physical education, recently.
Miss Campbell stressed the fact
that although the teaching profes-
sion in general is overcrowded,
there have never been e n o u g h
teachers of physical education.
Among the graduates who have
gone out from the major school in
the University, she claimed that
there were many who have gone as
municipal playground directors,
many who are in charge of the
athletic activities of industriall
workers, as well as those who have
gone into organizations such as Girl
Scouts, Campfire Girls, the Nation-

Chorus
Chorus
Chorus
Chorus
Chorus
Chorus

JUNIOR GILS' PLAN'
REHEARS.-ALS
All rehearsals will take place
in the League Building Tuesday.

B.
G.

Chorus B,
Chorus G,

Thua
with Mi."-, ,Loina
with Mis Loomis

6 _0

Chorus D4................0
Chorus C.................40
Chorus E................ I
Chorus C, with Miss L oomi
Chorus D, with Miss Lcon 4
Chorus A.................4,1
Chorus F................0
Chorus E ...........:. ... . ... .5
Saturday
Chorus A. with Miss Looms 10:00

Chorus G...........
Chorus D ..........
Chorus B ..........
Chorus E .............
Chorus A .............
Chorus C........... .
Wednesday

CLER DOMITORIES GIVE
<AFFAPiRSFRDAI

I -

al Recreational Association, and
into teaching. Helen Newberry, Viola Schuber, 31
Miss Campbell further stated that in Martha Cook, and Lu;i B non.
among the universities which have '31, in Mosher-Jordan.

been offering undergraduate work
in a major course of physical edu-
cation, many are now including
graduate work in this field, and for
the first time the University will
offer a full summer schedule this'
year, including the g r a d u a t e
courses.
WOMEN ASSIST IN
PEACE MOVEMENT
Aim Is to Get Signatures for
World Court Petition.
Women were in no small way
responsible for the sudden furror
which arose in the past week over
the agitation for the world court
movement. For as a result of the
enthusiasm brought back by the
University representatives from the
Y. W. C. A. conference which was
held in Geneva the sumer of 1930,
we find Paul Harris here in Ann
Arbor.
From the center of Harris hall
where Paul Harris was first brought
the movement has spread through-
out the campus as a thing entirely
sponsored by students.
In an attempt to obtain signa-
tures for the petitions which the
agtators wished to forward to the
senators ,in hopes that they might'
stimulate some action on the sub-
ject, women assisted by reaching
the residents of the dormitories.
Roberta Reed, '31, canvassed in

Many speeches were made dur--
ing the campai~n. and wvo:;'en also
assisted in this part of the cam-
paign. Catherine Robinson, '32,
spoke before a group of 125 Con-
gregational students Friday night,
where she was successful in obtain-
ing many more signatures. Eliza-
beth Norton, '33, also spoke in be-
half of the cause Friday night be-
fore a group in the Methodist
church.
Ypsilanti women worked in co-
operation on the subject with a
program of attack very similar to
that of this University. Many let-
ters were sent out seeking support
for the movement. Viola Schubert
addressed one to Royal S. Cope-
land and received a telegram in
reply which turned out to be a
verbatim copy of replies to other
letters. It read something to this
effect: "Will keep your letter before
me when the question comes up."

A o-aae a er' ,a port, In-
di nG, ,hoMade a small iortune in
the lke-rde1on, Texas, oil fields
said to have received $70,000 forI
the 116 acres she sold, and she still
has 400 acre;, whose worth is esti-
mated at $200,000. She invested
$500 as an iiitial investment.
UNIVERSITY OF CINCINNATI
Men at the University of Cincin-
nati have catalogued the varsity
co-ed into three groups. The first
is the "lapel-hanger," or "Aren't
you wonderful?" girl.

FOUNTAIN AND LUNCH SERVICE
WE DELIVER
From 10a. m. to 11 p.m.
Dial 7850
Drugs and Toilet Requisites
1117 East Ann Street
1V2 Blocks West of University Hospital

TYPEWRITING
and
MIMEOGRAPHING
A specialityrfor twenty
year .

Prompt servie d.r.t. Experienced oper-
ators. . . Moderate rates.
0. D. MORRILL
314 South State St. Phone 6615
ST PEPPING

..4:00
.......4:00
.5-0
.7:30
.7. ,5

A..
C..
E..
F..

............

House Directors and Residents
Serve Tea Saturday
Afternoon.
In honor of the visiting deans
who met here in a national con-
'erence over this past week end,
the dormitories held open house
SA icardy afternoon from 3:00 until
5:00 o'clock,
Te committees of the various
hou-es including the directors of
houses and the student officers
were in charge of the arrange-
onte ur teas. Tea was served in
both the divisions of Mosher-Jordan
ial . Tue most elaborate arrange-
rents were made by Martha Cook
dormitory. Tea was served here in
the Blue room, and the guests were
enteftained during the afternoon
by Miss Elizabeth Chandler, '32, and
Miss Louise Keegstra, '32, who play-
ed the piano.
Those who received at the Mar-
tha Cook tea were as follows: Miss
Margaret Ruth Smith, social direc-
tor, Miss Alta Bernice Atkinson,
house director, and Miss Kathryn
Van Zoern, '31, house president. The
general chairman in charge of the
particular arrangements was Miss
Ella Crile, '31, the vice president of
the house who was assisted by Miss
Edith Ellen Haughey, '32, and Miss
Lenore Maten, '31.

INTO

A

M4ODERN WORLD

---

Intramural managers will meet
at 4 o'clock this afternoon in Bar-
bour gymnasium to discuss plans
for the Intramural swimming tour-
nament which will be held during
the last week of March. Prelimin-
aries for the tournament will begin
next week, and will continue on
Tuesday and Thursday evenings at
the Union pool until the night ofr
the final meet.
Women students interested in
fencing as an extra-curricular ac-,
tivity are asked to attend a meet-k
ing at 5 o'clock this afternoon in
Barbour gymnasium.?
Plans for an open hour of danc-
ing to be held every Wednesday
night will be discussed at the meet-
ing to be held at 7:30 o'clock to-t
morrow night in the lounge of the
Women's Athletic building. Aboutj
50 invitations to attend the meet-
ing have been sent to women in-
terested in dancing. Marion Heald,k
'33, W.A.A. chairman of dancing, isf
in charge of the meeting, and is
being assisted by Barbara Swift, '34,
Elizabeth Whitney, '31, and Helen
Moore, '31. Miss Emily White of
the physical education faculty is
arranging a program of dancing to
be presented during the evening.
Ping-pong tournament entrants
were paired off yesterday and will
begin playing at 4 o'clock this aft-
ernoon. The contestants will play
between 4 and 6 o'clock every after-
noon this week, and the two tables
in Barbour gymnasium and one in
the Women's Athletic building will
be used.
WASHINGTON
SHOP
107 East Liberty
Shoe and Hat
Service ;

. Shiny %

' and Tiny
-the Straw Hats
that are the new vague
-and reproduced at
$7.50
"Little," but important new trim-
mings of gardenias, and ribbons.
Jacobson'9s

/ ' . -- ; jV 4 Y zic iv'-..-
,;tip S
/ - / 'U
t~ ,.)
.1t

II. -- -- ----~- ___
Ii.____________________________________________ --------~E:

LABORATORY
SUPPLIES
'CHEMICALS
DRUG
SPECIALTIES
SUNDRIES

'E B E F 0
AND
ESTABLISHED 1843
200-202 E. LIBERTY ST.

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Out of 25 telephone companies

+a00ONE
Greater ability to serve the public is the rea-
son for the Bell System - made up of the
American Telephone and Telegraph Compa-
ny and its 24 associated telephone companies.
The Bell System is operated by these 24
associated companies, each attuned to the
area it serves. Each enjoys the services of the
staff of the American Company, which is
continually developing better methods. Each

SYSTEIM
benefits from the work of the Bell Telephone
Laboratories and Western Electric - scien-
tific research and manufacturing branches of
the System.
Bound together by common policies and
ideals of service the Bell System companies
work as one. In helping to administer this
$4,000,000,000 property, men find real
business adventure. The opportunity is there!

i}

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