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May 08, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-08

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

TIHE MICHIGAN

DAILY-

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AF FAI WIL ARK
EVNT5CHDUE
More Than Three Hundred Plan'
to Attend; Alumnae, Mothers,
Students Invited
GLEE CLUB TO SING
Jeannie Roberts, '32, as Social1
Chairman, Heads Committee
for Arrangements.
Formal recognition of Mothers'
Week activities by the League will
take place when the first annual
Mother and Daughter luncheon is
given at 12:30 tomorrow noon in
the main ballroomof the building.
More than three hundred are ex-
pected to attend the affair, and not
only visiting mothers and alumnae,
but all women on campus have been
invited to be present.
Eittertainment Planned.
The luncheon is being planned in
conjunction with the events which
are' scheduled for Homecoming
Week-end, and will precede a bridge
tea which will be given by members
of Wyvdrn, junior honorary society-
A 'program of entertainment has
been .arranged, and skits from
"Caime the Dawn!", this year's
Juniodr Girls' play, will be featured.
Mare Westm, '32, Eily Randall,
'32, B ;rnette Bradley, '32, and Helen
Van Loon, '32, will present selec-
tions from the play, while Ruel
Kenyon will act as accompanist.
The University Girls' Glee club
will also offer several numbers, and
will lead in the mass singing of
Michigan songs..
Social Head in Clarge.
Jeannie Roberts, '32, as social
chairman of the League, is in
charge of arrangements for the
affair, ad she is being assisted by
Eleai'ioe Wlkinsha W,.32, Ruth
Babbitt, '31Ed, Elizabeth Eagles-
field, '33, Pauline Richards, '32Ed,
Jane Thalman, '33, and Margaret
O'Brien, '33. Miss Ethel McCormick,
social director, has acted as super-
visor. .
A limited number of tickets are
yet available, according to Miss
Roberts. Group arrangements for
seating will be made i specifled
when reservations are mde. Tick-
ets will be on sale at a desk in the
main lobby of the League building
frot 1 to 5 o'clock this afternoon.
"Dig a Dime for a Doughnut" will
be the slogan of the Y.W.C.A. Frosh
commission of the University .of
Oregon early next week when the
organization holds a doughnut sale
on the campus. The profits from
the sale will be used to finance an
annual tea which is given for all
the high-school girls in Portland,
Ore., who intend to enter the Tni-
versity next fall.

RUTH ANN OAKES
TO DIRECT' DRAMA

Mrs. Ruth Ann Oakes,
Who is directing the new Comedy
Club play, "Pierre Patelin," a med-
ieval fare to be given tonight and
tomorrow night in the Lydia Men-
delssohn theater. There will be a
Saturday matinee.
MODERN STUDENTS
HAVE ADVANTAGEi
Director Believes High School
Training Is Excellent.
"Men and women of today have
the chance of an experience and
background which. gives them an
ability and the power of interpreta-
tion in their field of drama that we
of the old school knew nothing
about," said Ruth Ann Oakes, pres-
ent director of Comedy club, in an
interview yesterday.;
Mrs. Oakes believes college dra-
matic clubs should devote their
fields to literature, well done. The
new- Comedy club presentation,
"Pierre Patelin," is a medieval farce
done according to the old time
French system of unity of time,
place and action. It coincides with
the modern ideas of college experi-
mentation in drama, and the direc-
tor believes it a "thoroughly worth-
while revival, full of action and un-
usual skill." Such plays are not out
of harmony with present-day eam-
pus life, for they possess an appeal
which is universal.
To keep in tone with the fifteenth
c e n t u r y, imitation parchment
scrolls will be used as programs,
and the scenery will be made on
the two-level plan,.
"The attitude of the average
drama student today has changed
in the last eight years with the
growing number of outside activi-
ties, Mrs. Oakes stated. "He no
longer can put his life and soul in-
to the act, for he has too many oth-
er distractions. But due to the su-
perb preparation that men and wo-
men have received in high school
we are able to start them in a jump
ahead."

SCHOOL TO SPEAYl
Marjorie Nicholson, '14, to Talk
on Science and Poetic
Imagination.'
As one of the non-resident lec-
turers brought here each year by
the office of the Dean of Women,
Miss Marjorie Nicolson, '14, Dean of
Smith College and professor of
English, will speak at 4:15 o'clock
this afternoon iii room 1025 Angell
hall on "Science and Poetic Imag-
ination." This lecture will be open
to the general public.
'Dean Nicolson attended Michigan
as an undergraduate and obtained
her A. M. here in 1918. Two years
later she was awarded a Ph. D. by
Yale University. She also did grad-
uate work at Johns Hopkins Uni-
versity and abroad, and in 1926
received a fellowship from the
John Simon Guggenheim Memorial
Foundation.
As a teacher in two Michigan
high schools, and later as assistant
professor of English at the Uni-
versity of Minnesota and Goucher
College, she has had a wide exper-
ience in education work. In 1926 she
joined the faculty of Smith College,
and was made Acting Dean in 1929.
"The Art of' Description" and
"Conway Letters" are two of the
books which have won her recogni-i
tion as an authority in her field,
and she has also contributed num-
erous aritcles to "Studies in Philo-1
logy," "Philology Quarterly," "Mod-
ern Language Notes," "Philosophy
Review," "Modern Philology" and
the "Atlantic Monthly." Dean Nicol-
son has also edited selections froni
Shelley and Keats, and from Ten-
nyson.
She is affiliated with the Modern
Language Association of America,
the American Association of Uni-
versity Professors, the British Insti-
tution of Philosophical Studies, Phi
Beta Kappa and Chi Omega.

Sorority Houses Plan
Varied Functions for
Mother's Week-end
Although nearly every campu-
sororit is occupying itself with
plans ?or Mother's Week-end par-
ties, one house var ied the social
events of the week with a formal
faculty dinner.
Collegiate Sorosis honored several
members of the faculty and their
w ives at a formal dinner last night
'The guests were Prof. Win. Clarkc
Trow and Mrs. Trow, Prof. Roy 11.
Holmes and Mrs. Holmes, Pof.
Henry Hutchins and Mrs. Hutchins,
Prof. Louis Straus and Mrs.. Stlrauis,
Prof. Harry Halley and Mr. Hally
and Mrs. Edgar Durfee.
Delta Zeta wishes to announce
the pledging of Beatrice Collins; 34,
of Detroit, and Beatrice Olm sted,
'34, of Cleveland, 0.
For Mother's Week-end Delta
Zeta has planned a tea Saturday
afternoon and a special breakfast
for Sunday morning.
Mothers of fifteen women at the
Alpha Gamma Delta house are
planning to spend the week-end
with their daughters. They will be
honored guests at dinner Sunday
noon. Miss Emily Butterfield, a na-
tional founder of Alpha Gamma
Delta, will also be present for the
occasion.
Alpha Phi has planned numerous
affairs for the entertainment of
their mothers. For this afternoon
the Ann Arbor Mother's Club will
give a bridge party at the house
for these guests and Saturday
schedule will include a buffet lun-
cheon at the house and the Wyvern
bridge tea. After dinner Saturday
evening the mothers will be taken
to see the play at the Lydia Men-
delssohn Theatre. Sunday a dinner
wil conclude entertakinment for the
week-end.
COLUMBIA - An investigation
made by Dr. Roy N. Anderson of
Teachers College, Columbia Uni-
versity indicated a lack of voca-
ti6nal discrimination on the part;
of women from 255 colleg s and
universities.

PHYSICAL EDUCATION INSTRUCTOR
EMPHASIZES OUTDOOR ACTIVITIES
Mrs. Dorothy Hall Cites Lives tinued. Considered from the stand-
of Ancestors as Example point of physical health, outdoor
oF ssexercise builds resistance to disease.
of-Ftness. "The newer education realizes
r r vhow closely the mental and physical
Edior' Note. This is the eighth of a
series of articles on the activities of the i life are interwoven. Bodily sluggish-

Takona, Y. W. C. A. P
Accomodates Forty Chid

'

" ysi I duCald0t deparment.
"If we had the opportunity to
talk with our early ancestors, we
certainly would not feel the need
of impressing the value of outdoor
activity on them," said Mrs. Doro-
thy Hall in a recent discussion of
outdoor sports. "Their very lives
wcre bound up in the out-of-doors.I
"Food, clothing and shelter de-
manded bodily skill and alertness.
Health and strength were absolute-
ly necessary for survival. Amuse-
ments were few, simple and active.
"Today we are reaching the other
extreme. Man has become a more
sedentary animal, spending the
greater part of his time indoors.
Machine methods, crowded city life,{
a great number of artificial and
chiefly passive amusements add to
the rush and accompanying nerv-
ous strain of modern life. There are
probably many people who realize
there is value in outdoor activity
but think they have no time for it,
little considering that they can not
afford to neglect it," said Mrs. Hall.
"The busier a person is, the more
essential it is that he set aside some
regular time for exercise," she con-
TYPEWRITER
REPAIRING
All makes of machines. r
Our equipment and per-
i o n n e I are considered .
among the best in the State. The result
of twenty years' careful building.
o. D. MORRILL
#14 South State St. Phone 6615

ness brings a corresponding lack of
mental alertness and mental quirks
and unhealthy mental attitudes are
frequently traceable to physical
rsources.
"There is no denying that there is
a moral value in wholesome outdoor
life," Mrs. Hall continued. "We enjoy
nature second hand fromn our artists
and poets. It seems to me the bAter
plan to get outdoors and obtain
first hand the physical hardiness,
the mental alertness, the moral
steadiness and boundless inspira-
tion of a fuller type of existence,"
Mrs. Hall concluded.
NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY
-Women who wish to learn to
drive may enter a special class in
automobile motivation which has
recently opened for the benefit of
Evanston women. It is being spon-
sored by the Evanston police de-
partment.

Three University women will
sist at the Y.W.C.A. summer co
for children during the coming
son. They are Olo Collins, '32,
will be in charge of music and
reation, Cathelia Pollock, '32,
wl offliate as an instructor in
turo craft, and Dorothy Kittel,
who will act as nurse of the ca
he position including general
pervision of the children's heali
The camp, which is called Ca
Takona',.is situated on Clare h
between Ann Arbor and Jaclk
The season opens officially on J
28, and will last eight weeks. E
camper's stay lasts from two to
weeks.
Camp Takona can accommo
but forty children at a time, a
is desired to prevent overcrow
conditions. Last year more tha
third of the campers were chile
of faculty members of the Uni
sity.

WOMEN STUDEN
TO DIRECT CA

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AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC OFFICE
CONSISTING OF ALL REMAINING TICKETS AS
FOLLOWS:

'A ;i' ~ I

III

II

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