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May 08, 1931 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-08

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THE MTCHIGAN DAILY

FRIDAT, MAY 8, 1931

d every morning except Monday dur-
iversity year by the Board in Control
tPublications.
of Western Conference Editorial Asso-
sciated Press is exclusively entitled to
r republication of all new s dispatches
o it or not otherwise creditcd in this
the local news published herein.
at the postoffice at Ann Arbor, Michi-
recond class aitter. Special rate of
;ranted by Third Assistant Postmaster

r
C

their work is especially commend-
able if only because it has success-
fully passed a faculty whose ideas
have been reactionary for so many
years. No doubt much more could
have been accomplished, and that
much sooner, had the committee
felt that the plan would meet fav-
orably with such an ultra-conser-
vative group-a group which, how-
ever, in the last few years has come
to the realization of the need for
a new order.

aSR TELL
SPRING
HERE!

dM~siC ANDo DRAM4I

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tion by varrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.50.
Ann Arbor Tress Building, Maynard
ones: Editorial, 4925; Business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4925
MANAGING EDITOR
ChairmanEditorial Board
HENRY MERRY
SANK E. COOPER, City Editor
for............... (urney Williams
Director............Walter W. Wilds
City Editor.. ......arold 0. Warren
itor ... ..Joseph A. Russell
Editor .............M.lary L. Behinyer
ama, Books.........sWin.. Dorian
' 1ections.......... Brtram J. Askwith
News Editor....... C1arles H. sprowl
SEditor...........George A. Stauter
or .................Win. E. Pyper
NIGHT EDITORS
yonger Charles R. Sprowl
rythe Nichard L. Tobin
Nichot Harold 0. Warren

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GOV. RITCHIE'S LIBERALISM
Governor Ritchie, of Maryland,
one of the most logical candidates
for the Democratic nomination in
the 1932 presidential campaign, has
proven himself to be on solid

Things have come to pretty pass
ndeed! One of the main stories on
he front page of Thursday's Daily
went as follows:
Determined opposition to the
University Council Plan in its
present form was expressed at
a meeting of the Literary Col-
loge Faculty yesterday after-
noon, according to a dispatch
in the Detroit Free Press this
morning.
.. ACCORDING TO A DISPATCH
IN THE DETROIT FREE PRESS
THIS MORNING-get that? Again
I say that things have come to a
pretty pass when out-of-town pa-
pers are given first chance at cam-
pus news.

TONIGHT: The Production by
Comedy Club of the medieval
French farce "Pierre Patelin" in the
Mendelssohn Theatre beginning at
8:15.
THE GOOD HOPE
A Review.
Mr. Windt's production of "The
Good Hope" is richest and most
completely successful student pro-
duction this year and certainly
among the best of the last four
years. An excellent example of one

'ii

Sports Assistants
. Fullerton T.. Cullen Kennedy
Charles A. Sanford
REPORTERS
L. Cooley Robert L. Pierce
ank ichard Racine
Gilbreth JEarl Seiffert
iberg Jerry E. Rosenthal
oodman George A. Stauter
elper John W. Thomas
nes John S. Townsend i

mt
embitz
man

Mary Mcall
Cile Miller
Mlargar4 O'Brien
Eleanor Bairdon
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret Thompson
Claire Trussell_

SusanAManchester,.
BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 21214I
T. HOLLISTER MABLEY, Business Manager
RASPER IL. HALVERON, Assistant Manager
' Department Managers
Advertising................Charles T. Kline'
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service'..'...N.........orris J. Johnson
Publication ............Robert W. Williamson
Circulation.........Marvin S. Kobacker
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x Assistants
Harry R. Begle Noel D. Turner
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William Brown-' William Morgan
pobrtCAlahan Richard Stratemeef mW lji et ye
WillarW ais Kith Taeer
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Erie Rightlinger Byron C. Vedder
Ann W. verner Sylvia Miller
Marian Atran Hlen Olsen
Helen Bailey Mildred Postal
Josephine Convisser Marjorie Rough
Maxine Fshgrund ' Voay E. Watts
Dorothy LeMire Johanna Wiese
Dorothy Laylin
FRIDAY, MAY 8, 1931
Night Editor - JOHN D. REINDEL
"NEW MICHIGAN PLAN"
With faculty sanction of the re-
organization of the curriculum of
the literary college, the University
has taken a step which should have
been taken years ago. But no less
desirable now because of its tardi-
ness, the plan will transform the
literary college in the next ten
years until it will in no way re-
semble the present antiquated sys-
tem, if, of course, the faculty and
the administrative officers maintain
the spirit which led finally to the
adoption.
Significant is the fact that there
was little opposition to the plan in
general among faculty members ex-
cept for a few who continually hol1
to the old order, and who rebel at
the thought of toning up Michi
gan's academic life. Educators and
others who expect to see an im-
mediate and conspicious change in
the college will be sadly disappoint-
ed, however, for the whole plan
leans toward a very gradual revi-
sion of the curriculum.
The three objectives of the plan
are without doubt sound, and will
prove of more value as time passes.
Lack of concentration in work
during the four years in college is
undoubtdly a worthy objection to
the present system, and will be
remedied if the proposed plan is
approved by the Regents.
Formation of an efficient advis-
ory system is one of the desirable
features of the plan. Under the
present system a student may have
his courses approved by any one of
an unexhaustable list of men, the
majority of whom. have no parti-
cular interest in the student or the
courses he elects. With the adop-
tion of the new plan a system will
be evolved whereby students will
be assisted throughout their under-
graduate courses in arranging their1
work on a co-ordinated and intelli-
gent basis.
The breaking down of artificialf
departmental lines and the corre-
lation of courses is a tendency oft
the new plan, the possibilities of
which are limitless. When depart-
ments realize that their courses aret
of sninfiance t other nors and4

groun'd in indicating that national1
prohibition was the "direct oppo- X
site of that much, discussed virtue1
-prohibition." Clearly, if liberal-X
ism means anything, it connotes
an attitude of tolerance, a feeling
of "live and let live" to which all
artificial straight-jackets-and na-
tional prohibition has been classed
as one-must be highly repugnant.
The New York Herald-Tribune,
long the friend of the Democratic
party and one of the most liberal-
minded newspapers in the country,
remarks that Gov. Ritchie's liberal-
ism speech shows a "respect for
the fundamental liberties upon
which the republic was based." Not
only does this stress on 'liberty per
se imply that the Governor's plat-
form will include an anti-prohibi-
tion plank in the coming presiden-
tial election, but it indicates a re-
turn to the very basis of the Alex-
ander Hamilton-Thomas Jefferson
dissention in the infant years of
American history.
"In so far as liberalism connotes
freedom and tolerance," the Trib-
une comments, "this not only
means personal liberty to eat, drink,
and provide yourself with the
means therefore in proportion as
you are able so to do; it also means
nationaf liberty so that the large
family of which every American is
a part is able to follow its just
aspirations without illiberal inter-
ference. Liberalism thus has a con-
servative aspect which seems to be
completely forgotten."
Our long-heralded battle to the
death on the prohibition issue
seems to be just over the hill, des-
pite the Anti-Saloon league's firm
denial that the sky is anything but
Octoberial blue.

And still there are members "
of the faculty who wonder why
the Daily shows signs of losing
popularity among the student
body.
- *
The only chance the Daily has
under conditions like these is to
refuse to print University news at
all, and take to reporting the latest
developments in the Law Club cel-
lar. Here at least there can be no
holdouts on what is happening.
CONTRIBUTION
Dear Dan:
Maybe you've noticed all the
trees and shrubs the B. and G.
boys are sticking promiscuous-
ly around the campus. Haven't
we got enough trouble with the
co-eds without them trying to
make a wild life sanctuary out
of the place! I suppose that
after putting lamp posts all
around last year in order to
lighten up all the dark corners,
they've had a change of heart
and are going to give us a
break by making a lot of tryst-
ing places. Maybe the B. and G.
boys are setting the stage for a
little social campaign of their
dwn. At this rate, the campus
will get as common as the
Boulevard and there won't be
any privacy anywhere.
And if you want to start a
new game, something for a new
thrill, just ask a forestry stu-
dent if his school is doing the
planting. Just ask him! If you
get away with it twice, you
don't need to stay in school
until graduation-you're ready
to face the world now! There
may have been some reason for
planting a couple of Scotch
Pines conspicuously before the
main arch of the Law Club, but
it doesn't take very much com-
mon sense to know that you
can't handle trees like fence
posts, just at any old season of
the year, and expect them to
stand the shock. Even a Forester
knows better than that-and,
Heaven knows, even the engi-
neers look down on us!
Greenbriar Bill.
-* * *

of the most important movements
in the history of drama-the end-
of-the century discovery of the
proletariat and his social problems
as dramatic material-was restor-
ed in a sensitive performance. The
experience was remarkably worth-
while. One would have regretted
missing it. Onecan for some time
refer to it in one's thinking about
the drama. In offering such an ex-
perience, Play Production has real-
ized for the first time this year the
function it could be consistently
realizing if, granted the necessary
conditions, it would only abandon
its preoccupation with year-to-
year Broadway specimens; if it
could perhaps get reassurance from
various sources that its consider-
able patronage is more thankful
for this careful restoration of a
solid, however out-of-the mode,
play than for "Rollo's Wild Oat"
or "Rebound."

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THIRD CONCERT, "Old Johnny
Appleseed" by Gaul. Hilda Burke,
Soprano; Eleanor Reynolds, Con-
tralto; Palmer Christian, Organ-
ist, Orchestral accompaniment;
Children's Festival Chorus; Eric
Delamarter and Juva Higbee,
Conductors, Friday afternoon.
FOURTH CONCERT, Ignace
Jan Padercwski, Pianist; Chicagb
Symphony Orchestra, Frederick
Stock, Conductor, Friday Evening.
FIFTH CONCERT, Ruth Breton,
Violinist; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Saturday afternoon.
SIXTH CONCERT, tBoris Go-
dunof" in English by Mussorgsky.
Cyrena Van Gordon, Contralto;
Walter Widdop, Tenor; Nelson
Eddy, Baritone; Chase Baromeo,
Baritone; Fred Patton, Bass; Chi-
cago Symphony Orchestra; The
University Choral Union, Earl V.
Moore, Conductor, Saturday Eve-
ning.

May
Festival1
Hill Auditorium, May 13, 14, 15,
16.
Tickets (6 concerts) $6.00, $7.u0,
$8.00.
FIRST CONCERT, Lily Pons, So-
prano; Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra, Frederick Stock, Conduc-
tor, Wednesday Evening.
SECOND CONCERT, "St. Francis
of Assissi" by Pierne. Hilda Burke,
Soprano;Eleanor Reynolds, Contral-
to; Frederick Jagel, Tenor; Nel-
son Eddy, Baritone; Fred Patton,
Bass; The Chicago Symphony Or-
chestra; The University Choral
Union, Earl V. Moore, Conductor,
Thursday Evening.

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III
VII

0

VOLUNTARY CLASSES

Along with the recently proposed
change in the curriculum of the
literary college come suggestions
from all parts of the campus and
from other universities throughout
the East concerned with the appli-
cation of new principals to our
educational system. Among those
suggested along the line of the
present scheme are the elimination
of semester courses in deference to
whole year elections, a return to
the former method of allowing but
few elective courses, and a much
more recent suggestion from Yale
university concerning "voluntary
classes."
College life has generally been
recognized as too replete with elab-
.orate systems, designed to prod the
student on to higher scholastic,
achievement, to insure the comple-
tion of the inevitable daily lessons,
and to restrict the undergraduate
in his expression of independence
and defiance of law and order. It
is indeed refreshing and unusual,
therefore; when a suggestion is
made that the student body cease
to "buck the game" and voluntarily,
hence more effectively, seize an
opportunity to improve their minds
without artificial stimulation. At
Yale, forty-six students have re-
quested Professor Westerfield, in
charge of classification, to extend
certain courses of value to one
extra session every fortnight. Ani-
mation in the thirst for knowledge
is a welcome fact, and through the
generous co-operation of several
Yale professors this desire to learn
more than just what is required
has been fulfilled at New Haven.
Professor Westerfield himself, in
his courses in business and econo-
mics, is receiving the plaudits of
the Yale campus for spending many
hours of his leisure time in supply-
ing the fulfillment of the desire of
this small group to advance beyond
the minimum scholastic design.
Michigan's step in the never-
ending process of striving for schol-
astic perfection is noteworthy in
more ways than one. Aside from
the direct benefits to be derived
from the proposed change in curri-
culum, the shift in educational
trend at the University opens up a
4- fn- "any c7h1 ,VdAf-iflt C' a Cl i nn

Dear Bill:
I disagree with your assumption
that there is a reason for planting
Scotch Pines in front of Mr. Cook's
recent donation. Jack Pines,-may-
be, but Scotch Pines, never, never,
never.
And you should see me look down
on engineers, too.
DAN BAXTER.
* * *'
DAILY POEM
See the B & G Boys planting

Mr. Windt in "The Good Hope"
was clearly working with his best
students: students that were per-
haps sensitive enough to work out
conceptions of character on their
own part. Consequently, Mr. Windt
was probably able to spend his time
as a director modifying these con-
ceptions into subtle inter-relation-
ship and manipulating their work
into those final and contrasting
refinements in the theatre: rythms
in the smaller and through to the
larger units of production; and a
meaningful attractiveness of the
separate static stage-pictures com-
posing these rythms. The fact that
a drama, which tended to be dull
because of it inordinate length;
a n d tendency to over-insistence
and over-writing, was constantly
effective with nearly everyone in
the two audiences I witnessed was
surely due to Mr. Windt's sensitive-
ness in these matters. Everyone
can supply his own particular ex-
amples. Most fertile, perhaps, was
the second act-with its beautifully
managed transitions through the
rude hilarity, the quarrel of Geert
and the ship-owner, the constant-
ly recurring theme of the mother's
mono-maniacal insistence in her
supposed duty to send Barend to
sea, to the quiet curtain. If it may
be put so baldly, "The Good Hope"
is Mr. Windt's fine vindication of
himself at the end of a feeble year.
Consideration of the student work
can only be a collection of too-
brief words of praise. Perhaps most
striking, I think, was Janet Wood-
mansee's incisive, comprehending
portraiture of the Dutch mother of
sailors: impressive alike in her stu-
pidity, in her -wretched humility,
and in her peasant strength. It is a
part full of curious, almost ab-
normal, illogicalities of feminine
emotion. Miss Woodmansee's play-
aing of it was always convincing and
placed the part just where it be-
longed in the experience of the
drama, as a prominent focal point
for all thinking about it. Alan
Handley was very effective as-
Geert, when he was tortured with
the humiliation of his prison-
experience and when he was blat-
antly "in the right" with all of
youth's pride in revolt and all of
.a big sailor's pride in his physical
strength. Eugenie Chapel (though
some of the difficulty of thinking
herself into so earthy a character
showed slightly) gave a splendid
performance as Jo, being particu-
larly good in the third act. Robert
Adams carried the play's most diffi-
cult part very adequately. A certain
lack of clarity about the degree to
which the ship-owner was genuine-
ly affected by the results of his own
tyranny may have been implicit in
the part; but Mr. Adams himself
should probably have made a clear-
er decision about it than he seemed
to have. Martha Scott, Olympia La
Marca, Jack Nestle, carried minor
parts well: not to mention Mildred
Tood in a type of a part which
she has several times done per-
fectly.
In fact the sheer quantity of stu-
dent talent Mr. Windt assembled
for this production is a good hope
for student drama at Michigan.
The evening that resulted when

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Un iversityMuiHos
Devoted to Music
Wil iam Wade Hinshaw
r. William and Maynard Phone 7515

Co

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Trees and bushes, short and tall.
Maybe they will all die off-
It's a fine world after all.
4 * *

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WHO IS LITTLE YVONNE
GAN?
Imagine, fellows, there is a

FA-
bus

in Ann Arbor named Herbert Hoo-
ver.
That is nothing, however ... My
roommate used to have a cat named
Tennis Court.
FRONT PAGE NIFTIES
REA WILL MODIFY
BAN ON WEEK-END
It saddens me beyond the power
of words to tell that I have been
waiting all these years in hopes
that someone would put a ban on
week-ends just so I could point
the finger of scorn and say "Look"
-and here there has been one all
the time. Dear, dear.
Don't forget the COATLESS
SHIRT CAMPAIGN! Wear a
coatless shirt and get pneu-
monia .-and get excused from
classes! The coatless shirt is
the coming thing in dress.

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