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May 07, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-07

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

~THE MICHIGAN DAILY

-THURSDAY, MAY 7,

nni- C " JAPANESE A VIA TOR ST"ARTS 6,268-MILE SOLO FLIGHT
TO UNITED ST°ATES; DESTINA TION IS SAN FRANISC O
va WACES° f

Com.:edy Club to Present Farce

ANN ,TA RBOR NEWS-BRIEFS

11

1111

NEW WK" S AIDES

opean Steel Magnate Claims
Present United States
Scale Excessive.
tES BRITISH EXAMPLE
er States Introduction in
Continental Countries
ASHING'TON, May 6.- (A') -..
;es and their relations to eco-
ic eqiuilibrium were brought be-
the International Chamber of"
Lmerce today by Aloyse Meer
u~ioemburg, president of the Eu-
;an Stee&l Cartel, who said the
rat tendency "may andI shouitlh
irecIted toward real high wages."
added', however, conditions in'
peans countries differ from
e in the United States and to
duce- the American s: stem ox
Lwages in 1no.st of there wou~1k
a.n extremely dangerous under-
ng.
Welyer Agrees',J R vetfi
onomic factors, he said, are
tiger than theoary and "i'mpose
nmeasurc whiclh must not be
eded without entlangerling thie
oral economic balance of a
try."
Vey, agreed with the report of
Olivetti, Italian delegate, that
limit of high wages has been
eded in the United States and
this "explains the attempt on
part of industrial interests to
in an increase in customs du-

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N A /0614 WSANM~O

Friday, Saturday Nights PLAN LJ flI UFFICE
in Laguc'Theatre. IMyo' ANisrtinSwr
Blckr~srvtonsand a lar-ge jin; 11 Get Po itons.
number o zsingle ticket. have been -l
cold for bot the Frida.y and Sat- Rteco mmendedc by Mayor HI. Wirt
urday n '-!Aperformance s of "Pier- INcwe~kirk to the Comm non counrcil in
re Patell:;," medieva l farce which! a mreeting Monday night ai ac-
will b- presented this xve ,ek-end in cepted by that body, the following
the Lydia Mendelssohn theatre by were sworn into off-ice yesterday, as
Comedy club, members of the new mayor's ad-
"The pla y was chosen for the ministration:
homec-mi" w~k-ed piforan- William M. Laird, city attorney;
cesbcas of its unusual literary George Lever, police commissioner;
and hscia neei, according Philip Schumacher, fire commis-
to Rth nn akes wh isdirct-sioner; George E. Lewis, park comn-
tng th rdcinisoe;John E. Wessinger, as
in P ierre ,Patelin was witi ya member of the bard of health:
unknown. au thor in 1464 A.D. Pro-I William L. :Henderson, member of
Kious t-, i ,s performance, the fif- thbt'ce boartd of public workirs; William
teenth century player gave all. hisMultch electrical inspector;
parts extemporaneously. This isClaude Kittridg e, electrician; Flor-
she first of the plays of its type to memeij-r l of LhaiM art comxittee:s
be accurately recorded for future and Norman M il,ade;r

Burglars Enter Home
Gaining entrance to the home of
Robert S . Bishop, 1915 Austin ave-
nue, Tuesday night by siuashing thec
glass in the back door, burglar:;
were reported by police to have
searched the entire house without
stealing anything. Mr. Blishop was
absent from the city at the time,
havlig left Emmna Schultz in charge
of the house.
unhurt in Car Crash
Uninjured when the car he was
driving yesterday crashed into the
I building nmaterials left on Geddes
avenue by city employees, Elmer
Stadel, 505 Second street, reported
to police~ that his auto was badly
damaged.
WANT ASPAY

f

i.

SeijIi Yoshihara, Japam's Premier birdman, started frum Tokyo on his 6,268-mile solo flight over the
roue~ shown in the map to San Francisco. The flier's plane, a light all-metal Junkers seaplane, is shown
above. He plans to go to Washington from San Francisco.
fKyte's Book Receives
A* RIW[ECTS STARTSpecial Commendaio
Prof. G.C. Kvte's book on ad- T nsrto n p rii n ofrr ed-I
Entration Rw Su ervis ed-I LLas J

pro uur uon.
Richard Humphreys, '31, heads
the cast for the Comedy club per-
formances and will play the part
of Patelin, the shyster actor about
whose actions the plot is built. Op-
posite Humphreys will be Ruth
Stesel, '33, in the part of Guille-
mette, Patelin's wife.
The other members of the cast
include Palmer Bollinger, '31, Stan-
ley Donner, '32, and Franklin Coin-
ins, '31. More than 30 extras will
be used in the production.

The council will meet tonilght to
d isculss the employment bureau
estfablis hed by former Mayor Ed-
ward W. Staebler.

I

f Da'ys tai

$5.00
Allowed on old garments tradedi
oni ciustoni tailored clothing.
CHIJA S. DGUKAS
[.319 South Uiversity

in

I

Squ~awds working on
in Architecture 8

Decoration
u Iking

for Ball May 15.

iting the cases of England and
'many since the war, Meyer said
policy of high wages in those -
rtries, although in mitigatedk
n compared with those in Amer-
had not given satisfactory eco-w
rli results.t
Gr~eat MB~itaan Brained. j
Witho~.ut pretending that their
resson is the exclusive result
hig~h wages," he said "never-
lss it cannot be denied that
y have been important contrib-
g factors.r
The other European countries
not practice the policy of high
e lalmed part of Great Brit-
s~ troubles on the fact that
le she has free trade the cost
diying and wages are high, and
ed:
r ree 'trade and low cost of liv-
must go side by side. One with-z
the other leads :to a disturb-
e in the, economic equilibrium."
Teat Brit~ain, he said, had been}
sidering abandonent of her
tradie policy. This he termed1
;very grave problem and one
'c might upset the economic
eture."
G TSHULER SEEKS'
'PRODUCTIONSm1
ys Written by Students Wl
Be Read in Detroit.
acour agement to students iri
ing plays was ex~pressed yes-l
ay by Louis Altshuler, a direc-
of the Detroit Playhouse, in anl
rview with The Daily.
hre Detroit Playhouse, Altshuler
1is an experimental group
)s policy is the production of
plays by American playwrights.
theatre was organized three
s ago, and this year has pro-
ed the works of Lynnr Riggs,
-tin Flavin, Roy Chanslor, Harry
nterm, and Virgil Geddes.
lays written by students and
nitt cd to the Detroit Playhouse,
buler said, would be read. It
pted, tney will be produced.
NIVERSITY OF COLORADO-
)rder to find out what the re-
Ise of University of Colorado
ents would be to cultural en-
ainment, Maurice Dumesnil, in-
.ationally famous pianist, play-
Mere before a student audience.,

Work on the design and decora-
tions of the nineteenth annual Ar-
chitect's ball, to be held May 15. in
Waterman gymnasium, has already
, ta tted, Floyd R. Johnson, '31A,
chairma-i of the' construction com-
mittee announced yesterday.
Several squads of students are
working on the details for the af-
fair arid will continue in the Ar-
chitecture Building until three days
before the date of the dance, he
added'. The preliminary plans were
worked out by Wayne Meads, '31A,
Frederick Schweitzer, 131A, and
Lorne Marshall, '31A, members of
the design committee.
The decorations will be in a mod-
ernistic tone, Jolmson° stated, and
will be in keeping writh the theme
Of the affair, which is the "Descent
of the Martians." rThe decorations
will feature a raised' platform at
one end of the gymnasium, upon.
which the orchestra will be placed,
with a staircase rising immediately
behind it. The staircase will be
used for the pageant which will be
given at the dance.
Prizes will be given for the most
artistically decorated booth and for
the most original and appropriate
costume. Costumes for the affair
may either be in keeping with the
theme of the deco ations; or may
consist of a smock or formal attire.
The orchestra for the ball, as an-
nounced by Percy Knudsen, gener-
al chairmen for the affair and
president of the Architectural; so-
ciet- will be, Paul Zpecht and, his
bard: from New York.
BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 11:30 to 1:30
VEAL CROQUETTES
CREAMED POTATOES
SCOTTAGE CHEESE
BOSTON CREAM PIE
! COFFEE OR MILK
30c
5:30 to 7;30
VEAL BIRDS
STUFFED PORK CHOPS
MEAT LOAF, TOMATO SAUCE
COTTAGE CHEE3SE,
STRING BEANS
-BAKED STUFFED HEART
ROAST BEEF
MASHED OR SCALLOPED
POTATOES
CREAMED CORN
35c

been accorded special recognition
by the Journal of the National Ed-I
ucational association, it was re-
vealed yesterday.
The book, the Journal says, has
been considered because it is "es-
pecially useful ."
Professor Kyte is professor of ele-
mentary education and supervision
here.
BRA yLLERWILL
SPEAK ON ARABSi
Dr. Peal W. Harrison Will Give
Address Next .Monday.
DT. Paul W. Harrison, noted tra-
veller, author and missionary will
talk at 4:15 o'clock Monday after-
noon in Natural Science auditor-
ium on "The Arab at Home." Dr,
Harrison is being brought here by
the International committee of the
Student Christian association.
Dr. Harrison has spent the last
20 years of his life on the Persian
gulf, and. has made tours hundreds
of miles into the interior where few
white men have ever penetrated.1
His research along medical lines
won him a fellowship in the Amer-
ican College of Surgeons. Dr. Har-
rison also holds the honorary de-1
1gree of Master of Arts from Yale,

Choice of Serving on Suggested
Committee Groups Left
to Individuals.
Members of the new Alumni Ad-
visory council, which is to have its
first meeting here in June, will
have a choice of 15 suggested groups
of committees in which to serve.
The proposed committees cover
practically every phase of the' Uni-
versity's activities, from student
life, to Ahe research institute. There
are comm,?ittees on campus plans,
on the library, on military science,
and on the various museums.
In addition to the names of at-
tending alumnni previously an-
nounced , the following graduates of
the 1J:., nivery have signifieid their
intention of attending the confer-
enec:
M\Jary Yost, dean of women at
Stanford university; Mary Louise
Brow,:n , dean of women at the Amer-
icana university in Washington;
Mason P. Rumney -and Elmer 3.
Ottaway, former presidents of the
University Alumni association; Ir-
ving K. Pond, designer of the Union
and the Women's League buildings;
Chester H. Lang, comptroller of the
General Electric company; Earl D.
Babst, president of the American
Sugar Refining company; William
A. Starrett, builder of the first sec-
tion of the Law quadrangle; and
James Baird, contractor for the
remainder of the Law quadrangle.

Gentlemen bring your old clothes to H-5 East Ann Street
and get a good price. Times are hard, ,ell your old
clothes.
D. MRDSK

r-

III

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