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May 03, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-03

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.


THE MICHIG1AN

D AI YE

a.. w .......

ITAIANSPRQPKESY
NEW. CONSERVATIVE
FACTION
Former Popular' Party May Be
Future Opposition to
Fascist Regime.
MOVEMENT IS CATHOIC
Pope Does Not Recog ize Body;
Mussolini Newspaper
Makes Attack.
ROME, May 2.-(IP)--There is no
political party in Italy but that of
the Fascists-but political thinkers
are watching with enormous inter-
est, the growth of a movement tnat
one day may develop into a trans-
migrated form of the old Popular
party and become the parliament-
ary opposition to facism.
Under the searching eyes of Mus-
solini and his lieutenants, who have
sternly forbidden
any form of politi-
eal manifestation
unless fascist, and
under the equally
keen eyes of the
Vatican, this move-
ment, statistics
show, has gone. on
steadily expanding.
This recrudesence
centers inmCatholic
Action, a men's so-
ciety with tens of
{tiCIU501~ithousands of mem-
bers, with branches
in every city and every parish.
Catholics compose 95 per cent of
Italy's population.
The Popular party was Catholic.
Organized by Don Sturzo immedi-
ately after the world war, it had
more than 200 representatives in
the chamber of deputies in 1922,
when Mussolini came into power.
It was a democratic Christian
movement, openlypolitical.
vot Recognize(-.
I was not recognized by the Vat-
ican, although the public 'assumed
it had the Vatican's sympathies.
The present movement is more
orthodox.
A convention of Catholic Action
was to have been held at Ferrara
recently.' It had the blessing of the
pope, sent by him personally. Sud-
denly the government stepped in
and the convention was ordered
cancelled.
Another instance arose when At-
tufrney Traglia, president of the
Federation of Catholic Youth, a
section of Catholic Action, issued a
circular to all his branches exhort-
ing them to further activity. He ad-
vised them to extend their work
beyond the moral into the econom-
ic field.
Pressure Exerted.
Pressure was exerted, the execu-
tive committee of Catholic Action
met and Traglia was forced to re-
sign.
In the last few weeks the Lavoro
Fascista, Rome's ultra-fascist or-
gan, has consistently attacked
Catholic Action, declaring that the
organization had stepped beyond
the limits accorded to it by the
Lateran treaties.
Yet Catholic Action goes on in-
creasing in importance. With pub-
lic ceremonies, processions, lectures,
creation of new societies, it brings
itself ever more before the public.
Fascism is a powerful institution,
but its chiefs are watchfully wait-
ing. The moment the new move-
ment rears its head in earnest,
something is likely to happen.
UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN-

Sigma Delta Chi, journalistic fra-
ternity, has instituted a best-news-
story-of-the-month contest here
for Wisconsin students.

REPORTER HELPS
TO FIND DOCTOR,

DUBLE ELEVATIONITT 1BIT
SET TOD BE BUILyT

Detroit to File Suit
Against Contracto

r7 DAILY OFFICIAL BULLETIN

ALMNRUBUISHES

Background for Production
Pierre Patelin' Designed
by Frank Harrison.

of

Sets designed and built by Frank
Harrison, '32, will be used in the
production of "Pierre Patelin,"
medieval farce, which will be pre-
sented by Comedy club Friday and
Saturday nights in the Lydia Men-
delssohn theatre.
The sets will be built on two ele-
vations, a single background form-
ing the setting for scenes in the
market place of the fifteenth cen-
tury French town and in the bed-
or> room of Pierre Patelin, the shyster
lawyer whose shrewd actions pro-
vide the central theme of the play.
This will be accomplished by a
Associated Press Photo .;series of sliding windows on the
John T. Rogers, second elevation of the house which
Reporter of the St. Louis Post- forms the background for the
Despatch, who was instrumental in market-place. A 15-foot exterior
the finding of Dr. I. D. Kelley, kid- staircase connects the two levels.
napped St. Louis physician. This is the first production of a
fifteenth century play on the cam-
pus within the last four years and
it is authentic translation and pro-
duction. Its -historical interest and
its comic treatment were the rea-
sons for its production in connec.-
tion with the Spring Home Coming
week-end.
MacNeil Approves Plan to Give Costuming for the play will be
- I uthenvtic for the nriodinw hich

DETROIT, May 2. - (AP) - Mayor
Frank Murphy announced today
the city will file suit against the
contractors involved for the $953,-
092.02 expended in repairing col-
lapsed portions of the Southfield
sewer.
Two sections of thel sewer, which
is of recent construction, collapsed
last year. One of them was built1
by Julius Porath & Son; the other
by Ennane & Mcllvenna.
The contractors have announced
they will attempt to show the fail-
ure were due to faulty design and
specifications.
TWOMA4TIQNS RU MT.
ENGLIS5H EXPILORER

(Continued from Page 8)
Zoology I, Quiz Sections 6 and 7: The assignment for Monday, May
4, is Chapter 12, to page 226, and problems 2-15, inclusive.
A. E. Woodward.
Astronomy-Philosophy: Professor Hebor D. Curtis, Director of the
Observatory, will lecture on "The Scientist's Right to Religious Specula-
tion" with astronomical slides Monday, May 4, at 4:15, in Natural Science
auditorium. The Tolstoy League invites the public.
Engineering Mechanics: Professor M. M. Frocht of Carnegie Insti-
tute of Technology will discuss "Stress-Strain Analysis of Engineering
Structures by means of Polarized Light," in the class of E. M. 9, on
Monday, Wednesday and Friday, May 4, 6 and 8, at 8 a. m. The first
meeting will be in room 443, West Engineering building. Subsequent
meetings will be in the laboratory. Anyone interested in tae subject
is welcome.
Alpha Nu of Kappa Phi Sigma meets in closed session in their room
on the fourth floor of Angell hall; Tuesday, May 5, at 7:30. The program
wil consist of the entertainment offered by the pledges. A short businessl
meeting will follow.

Planes, Boats, Dog Teams Help
in Search for Augustine
Courtauld.

i1

Current Issue Prints Facts e
University From Last
Annual Survey.
Under the title "Assorted Facts
there are published on the bac
cover of the current issue of tl
Alumnus, a number of facts abo
the University from the report f
1929-30.
The budget for the year 1930-3
exclusive of the hospital appropi
ations, was $6,557,102.30, the repo
says, and gives the total value c
the educational plant at the caj
pus as more than 37 million dk
lars.
Enrollment figures for the Un
versity showed a total of more tha
15,000 students, with 10,191 res
dent students, 2,822 extension t
dents, and 3-,673 Summer Sessi
students. There were 2,633 d
grees granted during the yea
Among the other facts about tl
enrollment in the University, t
report points out that 126 diffe
ent colleges and Universities we
represented by Law school suiden
and that there were 50 wom
studying in the medical scho
More than 40 per cent of the erg
neering students entered with a
vanced credit while 20. years a
only 10 per cent did so.
Sixty per cent of the Summ,
Session students already had ci
lege degrees and the enrollme
for the Graduate school for t
year was 2,601.
I -

s

Student Art
Sees Exhib

Prac
ition.

tice;

Pleased surprise at the high qual-
ity of students' work and hearty
approbation of the University's plan
of giving students actual practice
in art in conjunction with a regu-
lar college course, were expressed
by Hermon A. MacNeil, distinguish-
ed American sculptor, who acted as
guest critic at the second annual
exhibition of student sculpture.
Due to the unusually large num-
ber of visitors who came on April
26 and 27, it has been decided to
keep the exhibition open all week
in the studios in University hall.
Detroiters who are interested in art
have been tendered a special invi-
tation to visit the exhibit today.
In discussing the work with Prof.
John G. Winters, director of the
division of fine arts, MacNeil ex-
pressed special satisfaction and
pleasure to find that practical work
in the arts was going forward in
the University in combination with
intellectual stimulants furnished by
the balance of a college course.
What's
Going
On
THEATRES
Majesti---"The Devil to Pay" with
Ronald Colman and, Loretta Young.
Michigan--"Mr. Lemon of Orange"
with El Brendel and Fifi Dorsay.
Wuerth-"The Conquering Horde"
with Richard Arlen and Fay Wray.
GENERAL

it was first produced. This work is
being handled by Barbara Strat-
ton, '31.
* "Pierre Patelin" is the first of
the medieval farces to be accurate-
ly recorded in writing. Previous to
its first production, the actor gave
his part extemporaneously. No rec-
ord of the original script was kept.
This play was written by an un-
known author in 1464 A.D.
The cast for its production by
Comedy club is headed by Rich-
ard Humphreys, '31, who will play
the part of Pierre Patelin. Ruth
Stesel, '33, has the part of Guille-
mette, Patelin's wife. The other
members of the cast are Franklin
Comins, '31, Palmer Bollinger, '31,
and Stanley Donner,''32. More than
30 extras will be used in the pro-
duction of. the play.
Boatman Finds Body
of Missing Jeweler

REYKJAVIK, Iceland, May 2. -
(IP)-Search for Augustine Court-
auld, British explorer who is ma-
rooned on the Greenland ice cap,
moved toward its goal today by
land, by sea, and by air.
Capt. Albin Ahrenberg, Swedish
flyer, landed here Friday night aft-
er a flight from Bergen, Norway,
via the Faroe islands. He hoped to
resume his flight today.
The patrol boat Odip reached the
ice barrier of Greenland some time
earlier and unloaded and airplane
for Siguard Jonssen to take off.
The crew refitted the machine with
skis. Weather and sea conditions
were favorable for a flight.
Two groups of dog teams, driven
by friends of the scientist, were be-
lieved to be mushing across the
frozen wastes toward the tiny met-
eorological station in which he vol-
unteered to spend the winter. They
left Angmagsalik Friday afternoon.
A third plane, belonging to H. G.
Watkins, leader of the England-
CanadaC air route expedition of
which Courtauld was a part, pre-
pared to leave Angmagsalik for the
same purpose. Damage which it
sustained in February on a forced
landing has been repaired.
Maj. Sidney Cotton, who partici-
pated in the search for the French
Flyers Nungesser and Coli in 1927,
is reported by the London Daily
Mail as planning to sail Monday
with a special plane to lend his
assistance.

Adelphi Banquet: The annual banquet of the Adelphi House of
Representatives will be held at the Michigan League on Tuesday, May 12.
Reservations will be $1.50. All who wish to attend are urged to com-
municate with Gilbert Smith, telephone 8565, as soon as possible.
Phi Beta Kappa Initiation: The Initiation Ceremony for new mem-
bers will be held on Monday, May 4, at 4:15 p. m., in the Chapel of the
Michigan League. All newly elected members are expected to be present.
Orma F. Butler, secretary.
Freshman Pageant Women: On Monday, the Primitive Group will
meet at Barbour gymnasium at 4:15, the Impressionistic at 4:45, the
Priestess at 5:15. In the big gymnasium, the Waltz Group meets at
4:15, and the Gavotte at 4:45.
Monday Evening Drama Section of the Faculty Women's Club will
hold, as its last meeting of the year, a pot luck supper, at 6 o'clock, May
4, at the Michigan League.

3.

Accounts Department of the Michiganensian: Meeting Monday, May
All tryouts must be present.

Transportation Club: Meeting Tuesday, May 5, 7:15 p. m., in Natural
Science*aud. Moving picture "Railroading in Persia." Open meeting.
U. of M. Aeronautical Society: Mr. C. O. Ahrendt from the North
German Lloyd Lines will illustrate, "Art of Gliding and Soaring Flight."
as practiced in Germany, robin 348 W. Eng. bldg., 7:30, Wednesday, May 6.
Also 15 men will be chosen to take charge of the Aeronautical Exhibit at
Homecoming, Fri. and Sat. Election of next year's officers will also be
held, and final plans for the annual banquet announced.
Glider Section meets separately following Aero meeting for election

Trade NU HAIR

A litthe attention this time
of year will save you a lot
of hair. Only a few applica-
tions of NU HAIR will be
a wonderful help to your
scalp.
It is safe and aids the
growth of hair, checks d*W-
ruff and helpsbringthesc
to a h e a t h y condition.
Passed by the Michigan State
Board of Pharmacy.
On sale at Calkins-Fletcur,
Swifts, Edsell, Witham and
Broadway Pharmacy. Only
one dollar a jar.
CORYELL LABORATORY
P. 0. Box 1, Ann Arbor, Mich.

NEW YORK, May 2.-(AP)-Search_
for a diamond merchant who dis-
appeared six weeks ago with $20,-
000 of his stock came to an end
today and police turned instead to
the job of finding a slayer.
The body of Abraham H. Levy
was found by a boatman near the
Long Island sound breakwater at
Glen Cove, 1,000 yards out from
the shorefront estate of the late
Marcus Loew. The body was rid-
dled with bullets and wire was
around the neck, arms and legs.
An autopsy established that it had
been in the water for some time
and, that the shots were fired by
a .32 caliber revolver at 'close range.,
Identification was made from
dental plates. Relatives claimed
the body.

XPER
HALLER'S
State Street Jewuleo

of officers.
Garden Section of the Faculty
Women's Club meets Tues., May 5,
2:30 p. m., in Palmer Field House.
Mrs. O. S. Dufendack will speak on
German Gardens; Mrs. H. Bouch-
ard will speak on French Gardens.
SaddleR hors
Mullison Stables
326 East Ann Street
and
Fair Grounds
jPoe7418

SEE PAGE 4
for News of
BURR, PATTERSWS
GREAT SALE

I

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11

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WN 4

- a'

..-_ ..._. _... _ .., r .
L~

f 5VDDEN
, SERVIEEI

-r-T--

III

1

t

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90"

. - - =.--.-t-w="

FRATERNITY JEWELRY

PARTY FAVORS

Dancing
orchestra,

- Ray Gorrell and his
Grangers ballroom.

Ak I

,I.

ARCADE JEWELRY SHOP
CARL F. BAY
JEWEL R AND OPTOMETRIST
Nickels Arcade

AND
His Orchestra
AT
ARCHITECTS' BALL
(FORMAL, COSTUME OR SMOCKS-OPTIONAL)
TICKETS NOW ON SALE AT
UNION, UNIVERSITY HALL, SLATER'S AND WAHR'S
PRICE FIVE DOLLARS

.Y..,.....,......
_ _

FOR THE WEEK-END

I

WASHED, SCREENED
SAND-GRAVEL
ALL SIZES'
KILLINS GRAVEL CO.
CALL
7075, 7112 OR 21014

Moonlight Canoeig
Many New Canoes Are Awaiting
Your Call.
Saunders Canoe Livery
On the Huron River at the Foot of Cedar Street
OPEN UNTIL 12:00 P. M.

0

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FESTIVAL

21413

320 E. LIBERTYI

-E

The Complete Plant Food
Vert is rich in all of the vital elements to produce hardy growth and
a perfect plant. VERT is all that is necessary to feed lawns, flowers,
gardens, trees and shrubs. It is manufactured by Armour Fertilizer Works
from the highest grade materials obtainable.
Sheep Manure-Peat MossBone Meal
HERTLER BROS.
210 SOUTH ASHLEY STREET PHONE 2-1713

1

"Over the Counter Sale

o f Tickets for

Dance

Tonite

SINGLE CONCERTS

f!'

' i
r

ONE NIGHT ONLY

I

NOW ON

"Ann Arbor's Best Ice Cream"

RAY GORRELL'S
Famous Dance Band.

Tempting Thoughts for Tired Tastes-
Special this Week:
FRESH STRAWBERRY ICE CREAM

Featuring
JACK ROSEVEAR at Piano

AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC OFFICE
CONSISTING OF ALL REMAINING TICKETS AS
FOLLOWS:

I

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F

I

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