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May 02, 1931 - Image 5

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-05-02

Disclaimer: Computer generated plain text may have errors. Read more about this.

THE MICHIGAN DAILY *AErm

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Central.

Committee

Members Appointed for

SEVEN CMMITTEE
MEMBERS NAMED
BY fCENTRAL STAF
Bertha Hildebrand Is to Head
Music; Jane Fecheimer to
Handle Publicity.
PLAN TO CALL MEETING
Margaret Schermack Tap Dance
Chairman; Evelyn Neilson
Has Costumes.
With the appointment of seven
committee chairmen on the general
committee for the 1932 Junior
Girls' play, organization of the
staff is almost completed, as but
one additional member remains to
be announced.
Seven Are Named.
The following were selected by
the central committee at a meet-
ing yesterday; chairman of publici-
ty, Jane. Fecheimer; Daily assist-
ant; Anne Tobin; chairman of mu-
sic, Bertha Hildebrand; chairman
of costumes, Evelyn Neilson; chair-
man of tap dancing, Margret
Schermack; chairman of ushers,
Aileen Clark, and chairman of
make-up, Virginia Taylor. Another
chairman of dance will be named
at a later date.
These women, with the central
staff which was elected by mem-
bers of the junior class recently,
compose the general committee for
the play. The other heads include
the general chairman, Jean Bots-
ford; assistant chairman, Margaret
O'Brien, chairman of finance, Bar-
bara Braun; chairman of proper-
ties, Katherine Barnard, and chair-
man of programs, Catherine Hee-
son.
To Call For Manuscripts.
Tentative work has already been
started on the play, although no
definite plans have been made. A
meeting will be held in the near
future for all women who are in-
terested in submitting manuscripts
next fall. These manuscripts may
be written during the summer, and
willbe,read, without the authors'.
names attached, by the central
committee.
SMITH GRADUATES
PLAN CELEBRATION
Alumnae to Commemorate Semi-
Centenial Tonight.
Ann Arbo alumnae of Smith
College will hold a supper tonight
at the residence of Prof. Charles
B. Vibbert, to celebrate the semi-
centenial of the founding of the
Alumnae Association of Smith Col-
lege. All Smith College alumnae
clubs in the United States and in
foreign" countries are celebrating
the anniversary on either May 1 or
2.,
Each club will receive a telegram
from President Neilson of Smith
College, a letter from the president
of the Alumnae Association, and a
history written by the older pro-
fessors.
About 25 invitations have been
issued for the local meeting. Mrs.
Bradley Moore Davis will give a
short history of the group here in
addition to the speeches and greet-
ings from Smith College. Mrs. Ar-
thur E. Wood is chairman of the
local alumnae group.
President Neilson's speech to the
alumnae was broadcast from New
York last night for the benefit of

clubs in China, Japan, Honolulu,,
Toronto, Paris, Berlin, Munich,
Londoi, Beirut, and Vienna, which
are also holding meetings. About
6,000 of the 12,000 Smith Alumnae
are taking part in this celebration.
WASHED, SCREENED
SAND--GRAVEL
ALL SIZES
KILLINS GRAVEL CO.
CALL
7075, 7112 OR 21014

FASHION FOR SPRING AND SUMMER
EMPHASIZE NEW COTTON FABRICS
Formal Dresses Are Reminiscent coats, worn under chiffon, net, or-
of Gowns of Past Decades gandy, and eyelet embroidery will
in Line and Fabric. add an old-fashioned rustle to the
full skirted, quaint dresses which
By A. T. '33. will be shown.
Whoever first raved of the "rustle The old whisper "Petticoat show-
of spring" might well have applied ing" will no longer be a worry but,
his lyrics to this year's styles. With instead a source of smartness with
the new fad of taffetas and organ- these new styles. The taffeta pet-
dies, our new dresses will indeed ticoat would grace any evening
have that same swishing sound as dress, and even in street dresses,
the many skirted costumes of an- now, petticoats of plaid taffeta,
cient belles. and plain colored taffeta can be
Real "Party dresses" have been seen showing proudly an inch or

Z4 - ( p 0|( CANVASSES BY WOMEN AT ANNUAL
24 SC HO _ DEO0CA EXHIBITION PROVE UNIMPORTANT
Nura Shows Interesting Work of arrangement verges on the
of Unique Conception of souarish style of the poster-art. The

I -- i

Child's Fancy.

given a new life this year. They;
will be feminine to extreme, long
and full. Many old materials, com-
bined with new ideas in prints and
sheen will be used. Of these ma-
terials,. taffeta, organdy,. and eye-
let embroidery and net hold the
sway of feminine fancy. Chiffon,
shown in many new varities and
prints will be as smart as ever.
Fashion presents an intriguing
7-
a ~
/
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J $'
type of sleve treatment this year.
The craze for long gloves, in kid,
fabric and lace has made short
sleeves almost necessary as well as
flattering. The soft cape collar,
cap sleeve, and wide bertha will be
seen on many summer dresses. The
collars can be tied softly about the
shoulders, or simply draped from
the neck line.
This year's styles have produced
(or rather, rejuvinated) one touch
which will add still further to the
feminine air of evening wear and
more formal afternoon dresses. The
"petticoat" which was well on its
way to a natural grave in the cur-
iousity chest, has come back, and
in such a charming way as to be
almost irresistible: Taffeta petti-

two below the hemline...... inten-l
tionally!
PLAYERS UONCLD
OPENING__MATCHES
E i g h t Players Win Games;
Sixty-Four Women Enter
Tennis Tourney.
First rounds of the tennis tour-
ament were concluded yesterday,
and the names have been paired
off for the second rounds which
will start today, and which must be
played off by Wednesday, May 6.
All of the eight seeded players
won their first matches; these are
Virginia Gage, '31, Helen Wilson,
'31, Beatrice Erlich, '32, Thelma
Berner, '32, Sarah Bond, '32, Sarah
King, '34, Hannah Fein, '32, and
Virginia Watson, '32.
The winners of the other match-
es are Jean Perrin, '33, Dorothy
Birdzell, '32, Esther Loucks, '32,
Doris Clarke, '34, Dorothy Meade,
'30Ed., Joan Barnette, '34, Jean Van
Cleaf, '34, Loraine Larson, '32, Mar-
ion Schmidt, '33, Frieda Schaefer,
'34, Celine Smith, '32, Gertrude Si-
manck, '32, Katherine Hawley, '33,
Dora Bedford, '34, Lois Sandler, '32,
and Louise Karpinski, '32. Violet
Canberg, '32, won by default. Nine
couples had not recorded scores by
yesterday afternoon, and will have
to play both first and second
rounds off by Wednesday.
Sixty-four students signed up for
the tournament, and of these twen-
ty-five have already been paired
off for second rounds.
The schedule of games for the
second rounds will be arranged by
the individual players, and no ref-
erees will be required for these
games, the players keeping their
own scores. The tennis courts at
Palmer field will be open all day,
and tournament players will be
given preference over other play-
ers except those holding classes.
However, private and municipal
courts may also be used for play-
ing the preliminary rounds.

A.A.U.W. Accepts Graduates
for Membership; to Attend
Convention Here.
Because of the addition of twen-
ty-four institutions to the list of
those approved by the American E
Association of University Women,
graduates of these colleges and
universities are eligible for, mem-
bership into the association and
may take part in the Michigan
state convention to be held next
Wednesday and Thursday in Ann
Arbor. These institutions were ap-
proved by vote of the National
convention which m e t during
March in Boston.
The institutions which have been
approved recently are as follows:
Alabama College, Alfred University,
American University, Berea College,
Bucknell University ,Centre Col-
lege, College of Emporia, Doane
College, Dominican College, Crexel
Institute, Eureka College, Friends
University, Heidleberg C ol1 e g e,
Hendrix-Henderson College, Hiram
College, Huron College, Incarnate
Word College, Jamestown College,
Kalamazoo College, Keuka College,
Lindenwood College, Marietta Col-
lege, Marywood College, Millsaps
College, Missouri Valley College,
Municipal University of Wichita,
New York State College for Teach-
ers, North Central College, North
Dakota Agricultural College.
Oklahoma Agricultural and Me-
chanical College, Ottawa Univer-
sity, Our Lady of the Lake College,
Parsons College, Salem College,
Texas Christian University, Uni-
versity of Arizona, University of
Hawaii, the Universities of Arizona,
Hawaii, Maryland, Pennsylvania,
and Utah, Ursinus College, West
Virginia Wesleyan College, Wheat.-
on College, Whittier College, and
Winthrop College.
J

,C.cation for this treatment. In com-
Women who are exhibiting in the paring the work of these women
Annua Exhbitin of merianwAth$l the rest of the artists who ex-
Annual Exhibition of American Art hibit we find a lack of originality in
which is running in Detroit from all of them except Nura. Georgina
April 14 to May 17 are few in num- Klitgaard is the only one of the
ber and by no means represent the others who would stand out among
outstanding work which is display- the more competent creators.
ed.
However, as an individualist, the
work of Nura, which is represented Thousands of Letters
by a small canvass, The Little Pig From Douglas Found
Went to Market, holds a prominent
place in any show because of her CHATTANOOGA, Tenn., May 1.
entirely unique conception of the -Discovery in a barn of more than
child's fancy: The work which she 20,000 letters to and from Stephen
displays in this current exhibitA Douglas was announced by
however falls short of her usual George Fort Milton today, the 118th
degree of accomplishment; for she anniversary of Douglas' birth.
oversteps her own bounds in the Mr. Milton, editor of the Chat-
use of peculiar and almost unhar- tanooga News, who is engaged in
monious color combinations. wr iting a biography of Douglas,
Ann Broackman, who exhibits an said the correspondence indicated
oil, the Elevated Station, follows in that had the Illinois statesman
the line of Pene du Bois i her dis- been elected president in 1860 in-
regard for form in the modeling of stead of Abraham Lincoln "the
her figures. Most. of them have Civil w~ar would have been post-
that same lumpy formlessness that poned and possibly altogether
is characteristic of the former art- averted"
ist. All of her work is accomplished Finding of the correspondence in
through the use of shapeless mass an old box in a barn at the home of
iather than through the use of ne of Douglas' grandsons, Robert
lines. Dick Douglas, in Greensboro, N. C.,
Two of the women artists display was described by Mr. Milton as
landscape oils, Katherine Schmidt "certainly one of the two or three
with The Kingston Road, a rather most important discoveries of source
flat canvass with peculiarly dull material for the history of AmericaI
coloring, and Georgina Klitgaardmin the nineteenth century which
with Snow-Bearsville, a canvass has been made in recentuyears."
which shows excellent composi-
tional arrangement with an inter- OHIO STATE UNIVERSITY-A
weaving of horizontal and perpen- thousand invitations will be issued
dicular planes and a pleasing com- for the annual Matrix dinner of
bination of pearl grays and grayish Theta Sigma Phi, journalism sor-
blues. ority. Margaret Widdemer, author
Helen Farr shows on oil The Tag; will give the principal address at
of Wag, which in its block-like plan the function.
I, ___

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No

NOTICE
There will be a meeting of the
Theatre Group at 11 o'clock this
morning in my office, to discuss
plans for the marionette show
to be held on May 12.
(Signed)
Amy Loomis
CORNELL UNIVERSITY-T h e
woman pays and pays, but she's
going to pay more if the decided
vote for the affirmative side of the
debate "Should Dates be on a
Dutch Treat Basis?" means any-
thing. Judging of the debate was
by applause from the audience.

This is the season for per-
manents. We specialize in
Permanents $10.00
Oil of Tulip Wave
$10.00
Nestle Circuline
$7.00
EXPERT WORK
Open Evenings by Appointment
STODDARD
BEAUTY SHOP
317 So. State Dial 2-1212

/J

1'

I

MAY

FESTIVAL

Cost.

"Over the Counter Sale"

of Tickets for

SINGLE CONCERTS

-1 -
epaing and remodeling
Now is the time to have repairing and remodeling
done. The work is done with more care and at much
lower price then in the busy season.
Furs Coat and Jacquettes to Order
We will make you any fur garment to your individual
taste and measure at less cost than the ordinary ready-
to-wear. A small deposit will mean a considerable sav-
ing. ................................Dial8507

BEGINS

Decorate

SATURDAY, MAY

2

8:30

A. M.

Now!

AT SCHOOL OF MUSIC OFFICE
CONSISTING OF ALL REMAINING TICKETS
FOLLOWS: .

AS

Sherwin - Williams
Paint costs less than
any time in 17

MAIN FLOOR. ...... .$2.50

Ii

I

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