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April 28, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-28

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APRIL 28, 10"t

THE MICHIGAN DAILY:

-irr

LAB DR FE DRT[QNM
L i
GROUP RRDPHESIES
Committee Finds Modification
of Volstead Act in Next
Session Probable.
FEW BONE DRYS' LEFT
Report Urges Voters to Appeal
to Representatives in
Congress.

TO OFFER STUDY
OF DRY STATUTE

METIN OF STATE
EDUCATIONA EN L
TO ORE TKUPS'IY
f R T HIi e
Schoolmasters' Club Will Hold
Discussion of Secondary
School Curricula.
RUTHVEN GREETS BODY
Will Lead Honors Convocation
Friday; James R. Angell
W-11 be Speaker.

ANN ARBOR FISHERMEN COMPELLED
TO T RAV EL F AR FOR T ROUT FRIDAY

Donal Haines Claims Speckled
Beauties Are Scarce
Near City.
The trout season opens in Michi-
gan next Friday, but, according to
Donal Hamilton Haines, one of
whose interests is fishing and hunt-
ing, with journalism as his profes-
sion, Ann Arbor enthusiasts will
have to travel far to catch any of
these fish.
Not within 25 miles of the city are
there any streams where any great
catch of brook trout may be made,
s ys Haines. He explains that this
is due to the cutting of brush and

PHILADELPHIA, April 27.-(iP)-
Modification of .he prohibition lawI
to permit the manufacture and saleI
of light wines and beer is seen as
a possibility at the next session of
congress by Labor's national com-
mittee for modification of the Vol-
stead' act.
A report of the committtee, based
on a congressional survey, asserts
that there are only 17 "die-hard"
prohibitionists in the senate and 43I
in the house of representatives andI
that "victory is in sight if those
who have voluntarily enlisted in this
cause will make their wishes known
to the senators and congressmen
from their states."
The report, was prepared by
Matthew Woll, vice president of
the American Federation of Labor,
and I. M. Ornburn, president of the
Cigarmakers' International union
for submission today to the nation-
al conference of organized labor's
anti-prohibition group.
"Of the 96 members of the Unit-
ed States senate," the report states,'
"34 are willing to vote'for the mod-
ification of the Volstead act per-
mitting the lawful manufacture and
sale of beer and light wines; fif-
teen beliieve that beer is non-in-
toxicating, but claim they are not
justified in voting to change the
present legislation; twelve admit,
that a majority of the people of I
their states are producers or con-
suminers of illicit liquors, but claim
that the organized church vote is
of so much importance that theyi
do not feel it good personal policy1
to oppose it; ten feel that both the1
Volstead act and the 18th amend-c
ment should be repealed and the;
entire matter left to each state for1
the people of the state to decidet
what they want to do, and eight
refused to state their views.

other cove
Educators from the entire state the loweri
will come to Ann Arbor Thursday the summe
for the annual meetings of the temperatui
Michigan Schoolmasters' club, the and brook,
Michigan Association of College ter thatd
Registrars, the Parent Education cool.
institute, and the High School De- German
bating league.
The Schoolmasters' club, which is
holding meetings on Thursday, UI
Friday, and Saturday, will hold a
discussion to center about the ques-
tion, "What should be stricken!
from the secondary school curri-
culum of today; what modification
should be made in what remains;
what should be added?" Responses

r, which, together with
ing of the water level in
r months, has caused the
re of the streams to rise
trout cannot live in wa-
does not remain evenly
brown trout have been

planted through the effort of the (Eastern Sta
bureau of fisheries and the depart-
ment of conservation, he says, buto
as yet they are not numerous enough 'Bro dway stars of comedy and
to afford a large catch to spoits- song, with George Jessel as master
men. of ceremonies, will be heard over
* an NBC-WJZ network at 11 o'clock
Only a few small brooks remain tN!ghtvwhethor at
in ~ ~ ~ ~ ~ i thVatrnpr f h'tte ngtwen1 (huy perform at a
in the easternrpart ofthestatdinner in the Ho-
where brook trout can be found., tel Astor honoring
and there only in small numbers,
Haines asserts. of the American
One hundred sixty lakes in Mich- stage, David Bel
igan have been designated 'pike: n r
lakes this year, says a department Giore. Among
of conservation report. In these all . GiemoroAmong
t h e performers
species of fish except bass, bluegills, will be Frances
and sunfish may be caught. 'Williams, comedi-
Only "feeder type" streams will enne from "The
be closed to trout fish rs this year, Now Yorkers;"
the report continues, for the open. James Ba r t on
season of Mlay 1 to September 1. In. from "Sweet and
addition, several lakes in the upper, Low;" Jeanne Au-
peninsula have been designated. bert and .the For-
trout lakes. j JEANNE AUBERT man sisters from
Bills introduced in the legislature "America's Sweetheart;" Clayton,
on several, matters of interest to Jackson, and Durante from "The
conservationists are listed in the New Yorkers;" Helen Broderick and
conservation bulletin. Representa-' Lester Crawfor~d; aind Shaw and
tive Hartman, of Houghton county, Lee. The program will last one
has submitted a measure providing hourp
for the creation of an Isle Royale o
national park commission.
Other bills are planned to extend Efrem Zimbalist, violinist, will be.
the trout season through Labor day, I heard at 8 o'clock over WJR and an
and to fix the .amount paid persons NBC hook-up. He will play Adagio,
called to fight forest fires at 35 Scherzo-Hubay; Caprice Viennois
cents per hour. and Tambourin Chinois-Kreisler.
PH YSICIS TS PLAN Ravel's "Bolero" will be featured
WASHINGTON TRIP n ,. Pim, a

Dr. Ben A. Arneson,

Head of the political science de-
partment at Wesleyan university,
Ohio, who will offer the first aca-
demic course on prohibition as a
governmental problem next fall.
TAG DAY WILL AID,
HOSPITAL'S .SCHOOL91
Educational Board Finishes Plan
for City-Wide Benefit
Drive Saturday.
Plans for the tag day, Saturday,
May 2, for the benefit of the Uni-
versity hospital school, have been'
nearly completed by the King's
Daughters .educational board of the
hospital. The board is made up of
representatives of the v a r i o u s
King's Daughters circles through-.
out the city, with Mrs. Ray Baker
as chairman.
Members of various organizations
have been assigned locations as fol-
lows: Congregational King's Daugh-
ters in front of the Union, Metho-
dist circle at Williams and State
streets, Presbyterian circle at the
Nickel's arcade, Baptist circle at
the northwest corner of Liberty
and Main streets, Good Will circle
at Huron and Main streets.

In a message of greeting sent to
the representatives of this organi-
z a t i o n, President Alexander G.
Ruthven said:
"In selecting this general topic,
the club has, as usual,wisely chosen
something fundamental. Every per-
son engaged in or associated with
education should have this question
constantly before him."
The program Thursday will in-
clude a preliminary business meet-1
ing, and a conference of high school
and college relations.
The annual honors convention, at
which President Ruthven will pre-.
side and President James R. Angell,
of Yale university will speak, will
be held Friday morning.
The annual business meeting, the
final address on the "Keynote of
the 1931 Meeting," the Schoolmas-
ters' club annual dinner, a band
concert, and the state high school
championship debate, are sched-
uled for Friday afternoon and
night.
The meetings Saturday will con-
sist of various e4hibitions, a busi-1
ness scho'ol conference, a discussion
for the Michigan Association of Col-
lege Registrars, and a luncheon at
the League.

on Cam
f Ht
Response:
sororities,
them appea
University
been very
meister, '31
the MichY
chairmanc

CAMP DRIVEi
SEEK $81OOO
From Society Groups
npus Are Favorable,j
ofmeister Says.
s from fraternities and
in reply to letters sent
cling for support of the
Fresh Air camp, have
favorable, George Hof-
1, business manager of
ganensian and general
of the drive, announced

Sixteen Faculty Men to Attend
Scientific Convention.

Newell W. Banks, of Detroit, na-

last night.
More than $8,000 is needed to
support the camp and provide out-
door recreation in the summer
months for 400 underprivileged
children, at the camp on Patterson
lake. University students have been
given the quota of $3,000 to raise,
more than half of which is expect-
ed to be contributed by fraternities,
sororities and other campus organ-
izations.
Students prominent in extra-cur-
ricula activities, and members of
the "M" club will serve as the com-
mittee to canvas students, on the
University tag day, May 6. Mem-
bers of groups contributing as a
single organization will be given
tags the day before the drive, so
that they will not be approached
on campus.

tional checker champion, will give
Sixteen members of thenphysics an exhibition of simultaneous chess
department will leave Ann Arbor !and checker playing Friday night
this evening to attend and deliver in rooms 316 to 320 of the Union,
papers before the meetings of the under the auspices of the Univer-
American Physical society, in Wash- city chess and checker club.
ington. The meetings, which start Admission fees will be charged,
Thursday morning, will be held at Aditsanaiiona l fechorglayin
the bureau of standards and in the with an additional fee for playing
auditorium of the National Acad- With the expert. He is expected to
emy of Sciences. play 25 checker games, 15 chess
Among the members of the Uni- games, and three blindfold checker
versity staff who will present their games :at the same time.
papers at Washington are Everett
W. Thatcher and Neil H. Williams. Engineering Graduate
Their paper is entitled "Influence G t .
of Space charge on Current Fluctu-- Gets HighwayPostit
ations." "The Brownian motion of
Strings and Elastic Rods," is the C. M. Ziegler, '13E. has been made
subject selected by George A. Van ,deputy state highway commissioner
Lear and George E. Unlenbeck. to assume the duties of V. R. Bur-
A treatment of "Many Electron ton, '14E, who died recently, it was
Transitions" will be presented by announced yesterday by Prof. Roger
Samuel A. Goudsmit and L. A. L. Morrison, of the engineering col-
Gropper. . 1lege.

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Call for and Deliver
Phone 7373

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llustrated by Motion Pictures and Stereopticon Slides
THE STORY OF HIS STAY IN THE MOST SILENT SPOT ON EARTH WHERE THE WIND
ATTAINS A VELOCITY OF 200 MILES PER HOUR, AND THE TEMPERATURE REMAINS
AT 70 DEGREES BELOW ZERO FOR DAYS AT A TIME.

f Tickets Now o Stele a - hr's, SUnion, Leagi

hie
WIMUNMRMOR,

GENERAL ADMISSION AT $1.00.

A FEW RESERVED SEATS $1.50

Material Never Before Presented i Ann Arbor

II

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