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April 03, 1931 - Image 4

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The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-03

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THE MICHIGAN DAILY

'WIMITnAVY AlMlDTT 03 IA,01

> ... ,., . _ _. .JTH..M.C...A.-> AT.LYRJA', P

,IL 3, 1931

_ _ .... i

Published every morning except Monday
during tie University year by the Board in
Control or Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patchs credited to it or not otherwise credited
n this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of postage granted by Third Assistant Post-
inate. General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.S0.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 425; business, 21214.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone 4921
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
Ft ANK E. COOPER, City .Edite
N~ews Editor ...............Gurney Williams
Editorial Director .........Walter V. Wilds
Sports Editor ..............oseph A. Russell
Women's Editor...........MaryL. Behymer
Music, Drama, BHooks...... Wm. J. Gorman
Assistant City Editor....... H-arold 0. Warren
Assistant News Editor......Charles R. Sprowl
Telegraph Editor...........George A. Stautes
Copy Editor.................W-,. F. Pypet
NIGHT EDITORS

demands such as those of the Brit-
ish and French foreign ministers
are firebrands to augment the ever-
glowing spark of suspicion. With
the possibility of preventing an in-
ternational crisis and of redeeming
Germany in the eyes of the nations
of Europe, there can be little choice
for the German foreign office un-
less the agreement cannot be made
public. In that case, the agreement
itself should be foregone, at least
until satisfactory arrangements can
be made for it.

4 ii . -- -- --

UAND DRS
THIS ISN'T
APRIL FIRST 1fOZART A MAJOR CONCERTO:
EITHER
Y-, Played by Jasenh Wolfsthal and

P EN S
A N D Va
P E N C I L S
All makes and all prices
A Red Arrow Place
O. D. MORRILL
114 South State St. Phone 6615
- ~ -~- -- -~

tg 1 .l

PEDDLERS

S. Beach Conger
Carl S. Forsythe
David M. Nichol

John D. Reindel
Charles R. Sprowl
Richard L. Tobin
Harold U. Warreas

SPORTS ASSISTANTS
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy
Charles A. Sanford
REPORTERS

Thomas M. Coolew
Morton Frank
Saul Friedberg
Frank B. Gilbretk
Roland Gbodmax
Morton Helper
Bryan Jones,
Denton C. $uni
Powerf Moulton
Eileen Blunt
Nanette Dembit*
Elsie Feldman
Ruth Gallmeyer
Emily G. Grimev
,ean Levy
Dorotnyv Maee
Susan Manchestei'

o Wi*bur T. Men
Robert IL. Pierce
Richard Racine
Jerry E. Rosenthal
Karl Seiffert
George A. Stauter
Tolin W. Thomas
John S. Townsend
Mary McCall
Cle Miller
Margaret O'Brien
Elea nor Rairdon
Anne Margaret Tobin
Margaret 'hompson
Claire T ussell

Each year about this time the
campus and especially the frater-
nity houses are swamped with ped-
dlers, magazine salesmen, wood-
carving experts, and men who bar-
gain for old clothes. These individ-
uals find fraternity men an easy
mark for their "bargain rackets,"
for no place on the campus can a
group of individuals be found which
so rapidly yields to temptation.
Fraternity men are by no means
guillible, but they simply lack sales
resistence. There is always that
desire to sell something without
regard for its worth, and a dollar
means nothing when they can learn
a new card trick although the
chances are two to one that they
will not remember it over a week.
Many of the men who make these
professional v i s i t s to fraternity
houses are desirable, although the
majority are nothing less than a
nuisance. From such a varied
group there is always a number
easily tempted to make petty thefts.
These men should not be confused,
however, with ligitimate business
men who are of genuine conveni-
ence to the students. It would not
be an altogether bad idea, to de-
mand that salesmen and the like be
required to show a recognition card,
issued by an organization such as
the Interfraternity council, before
permitting them to enter the fra-
ternity houses.
The campaign has resumed in the
East against cities along the coast
who cast their bread upon the
waters, along with their egg-shells,
watermelon rinds and so forth.-
Detroit News.
Our idea of service in Florida
would be to have Gar Wood deliver
our regular mail, and Sir Malcolm
Campbell rush up the beach with
our special deliveries.--Detroit News.
E t- - ra Cet
Editorial 'Comment
oQ

BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 212 4
T. HOLLUSTER MABLEY, Business MAnamg
KAsrz II. HALVERSON, Assistant Man der
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
Advertising...............+.Charles T. Kline
Advertising .......... ......homas M. Davis
'Advertising.............William W. Warboys
Servici .. .............orris J* Johnson
Publication ............Robert W. Williamson
Circulation ..............Marvin S. Koba'eker
Accounts.................Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary............Mary J. Kenan
Assistants

This may sound to some like a
pretty general statement, but I feel
fairly safe in stating that this isn't
April first because it rarely occurs
twice in one week. It might have
been better if I had just said "To-
day is probably not April First, but
now I have made my statement I'll
stay by it until the last grasp.
ELMER tells me that spring
is really here. One of our fair
sisters told him today that she
had been walking in the coun-
try with one of her cohotsl
(very popular this year, cohorts1
are to be, too.) and she saw
three BEAUTIFUL COWS!'
a a *
They tell me the height of artis-
try is to see and describe beauty in
ordinary objects.
| *: * *
Did anybody ever notice the
exceptional bravery of the
C A M P U S OPINION writers?
They must be fine fellows in-
deed. They are willing to come
right out and say anything
about anybody, criticise fear-
lessly, laugh at the boys who
hold positions on campus and
won't do the same. Bravery, I
calls it.
* * *
But the fine fellows don't ever
sign their names. It must be that
they are too modest to want people
to know who the real public bene-
factors are.
Dear Dan:
Anonymous Campus O p i n i o n
writers are punks and sissies.
Yours . . . '32
INQUIRING REPORT ER'S DEPT.
I'll bet that nobody knew that
they had found a lovely cistern
over whre they're excavating
for the lovely Law Buildin.
They had to wait until every-
body had quit work before they
could tear it up on account of
it might flood the works. The
cistern, which used to be under
the old D. K. E. House, had been
forgotten fcr years.
And speaking of that excavation
business, would anyone like to bet
with me on how they are planning
to get the steam shovel out of
there? It would certainly be incon-
venient to try to build a Law Build-
ing with that thing underneath just
waiting to stage a nice upheaval at
the crucial moment . . . whenever
that is. And just one more thing.
about that before we leave the sub-
ject altogether-the variety of the
dump-trucks they use. They have
been adding one new one every day
for a couple of weeks now, and I
thought that yesterday they would
surely run out and have to repeat
themselves, but I had reckoned

Pros
Ariel :
Pros:
Ariel:
Ariel :

E MUSIC.0A11ND DRAMV1a ZJE
Symphony Orchestra conducted
by Dr. Weissman: Columbia Mas-
terworks Set No. 137.
Ariel: B eicre you can say, Come and Go
And breathe twice; and say, so, so,
Each one, tripping on his toe,
Will be here with mop anl mow;
Do you love me master? no?
Pros: Dearly, my delicate Ariel.

How now' moody?
hat is't thou canst demand'
:'dy liberty.
But are they Arie, safe?
Not a hair perished .
The king's son have T landed by himself;
1V1iom I left cooling off the air with sighs
In an odd angle of the isle, and sitting,
His arms in this sad knot.
To every article
I boarded the king's ship; now on the
beak
Now in the waist, the deck, in every
cabin,
1 flamed amazement:

School of
Music
Concerts

1111I

Pros:

And mine shall.
Ifast thou, which art but air, a1
a feeling
of their afflictions?

lou Cli,

J

f' .
,, ..
l "
1
1
9,
1
..
'' ;

Ii

GIVE CANDY AT
EASTER
Special boxes by
Gilbert and Johnston's
Easter novelties for your party
The Betsy Ross Shop
13-15 Nickels Arcade
We Pack, wrap, and mail

Mlarry. R. BegleO
Vernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davii
Richard H. Hiller
Miles IHoisingtozi

Erle Kightlinger
i5on W. Lyon
William Morgan
Richard Stratmeief
Noe:l D. It mr
Byrou C. Vedder
Sylvia Miller
ieei utstn
Mildred Postal
it Marjorie Rough
Mary E. Watt@
Johanna Wiese

Ann W. Vernet
Marian Atran
Helen Bailey
Josephine Convisse
axine Fishgrund
Dorothy LeMire
Dorothy Layli a

I hope these quotations will not
be mistaken as an attempt at read-
ing program into music. It is not
my purpose and I am certain not
their desire. However, if one has a
feeling for "Ariel, an airy spirit"
one will delight in this Mozart con-
certo. To be able to be aware of, to
conceive of the Ariel, who executes
such an apparently incongruous
thing as a sea wreck, an eager,
complete joy-in-the-process con-
juring of bogey-men and sprites,
and startles, "now on the beak, now
in the waist, the deck, in every
cabin, I flamed amazement," or of
Ariel, "which art but air," sensing
tenderness for "the good old Lord
Gonzalo. His tears run down his
beard, like winter's drops from
eaves of reed," is to have a clear
psychologic insight into this Mo-
zart. It is unfortunate that Shake-
speare hadn't beenna music critic,
at a later age, if only for the pur-
pise of giving us a knowledge of
the unique quality of Mozart's gen-
ius, a verbalization of the particular
nature of his music.
I And certainly this concerto would
make ideal material for any study
of the early and, if I may add, the
essential Mozart. It achieves a
greater unsubtlety of effect and
joy-in-the-process than that nearly
equally delightful "G maor piano
Concerto" played by Dohnanyi. It
is more directly spontaneous. One
may say that this is merely a dif-
ference in the quality of the solo
instrument; that the violin is mere-
ly a more pliant and intimate in-
strument for the performer, and
has little to do with the presenta-
tion of the musical idea. But in the
same breath one would answer,
that because of- this phiancv it he-!

(No Admission Charge)
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organ-
ist, Faculty Concert (Good Friday
Music) Friday, April 3, 4:15, Hill
Auditorium.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
Faculty Concert, Sunday, April 5,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
BERTHA HILDEBRAND, Pi-
anist, Student's Recital, Tuesday,
April 7, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Univer-
sity organist, will give a program
of "Easter Music" Wednesday,
April 8, at 4:15 in Hill Audi-
torium.
STANLEY FLETCHER, Pianist,
Student's Recital Thursday, April
9, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
THELMA NEWELL Violinist,
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist. Fac-
ulty concert, Sundav, April 26,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Faculty Concert, Wassily Besekir-
sky, Violinist, Hanns Pick, Violon-
cellis+, Joseph Brinkman, Pianist,
Sundav, May 3, 4:15, Mendels-
sohn Theatre.
RAYMOND MORIN, Pianist,
Student's Recital, Tuesday, May 5,
8:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, James
Hamilton's class will present
scenes from "Aida," Wednesday,
May 6, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, Students
of Nora Crane Hunt, Voice,
Thursday, May 7, 8:15, School of
Music Auditorium.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organist,
in Organ Recital every Wednes-
day, 4:15, Hill Auditorium unless
otherwise announced.

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i +

FRIDAY, APRIL 3, 1931
Night Editor-CARL S. FORSYTHE

I:

-

' ____
i w o n i -

WANT ADS PAY!

I

Downtown

4 doors So. of Liberty on So. Main

THE NEW "ZOLLVEREIN"

The public announcement a short
time ago of plans for the proposedj
Austro-German customs union has
thrown the whole of Europe into
a state of political turmoil. While,'
on the surface, much of the discus-
sion and argument seems to center
about the right of the League of
Nations by the protocol of 1922 to
investigate the provisions under
which the agreement will be made,
it is probably that the real troublel
is much more deeply graven intoa
the very political structure of thel
Continent.

MEN THINKING
(The Columbia Spectator)
If there is anything in this small
collegiate sphere of ours that leaves
us with the feeling that all is right
with the world and that, after all,
things are not half so bad as they
might be, it is the presence of a
few men on the University Faculty
who are what Ralph Waldo Emer-
son called "men thinking." To hear
one of these thinking men lecture
is a privilege that few are given, for
there are but a handful of instruc-
tors in these times who have grown
in their minds sufficiently to inter-
est the college undergraduate. Too
many instructors there are who
merely serve as mouthpieces for
the thoughts of others, who con-
tinually voice the aspirations of
better men and who regurgitate the
ideals of dead ages. The number of
those who comune with their own
spirits in the sessions of silent
thought is .pitifully small.
It is a regrettable fact that there

I

I,

1C

To many Europeans, the plan
suggests something very reminis-
cent of the century-old Zollverein,
This is only natural for the resem-
blance is remarkably close in many
of the provisions and the nations
of Europe have not yet forgotten
the powerful force which the first
customs union proved in the unifi-I
cation of the German nation and
the building of a power that was
for a time to rival any in Europe.

.- .en nn . .... ..,.. ..... ..... 1.1.

.in.t i ire so few men on th
There is, in addition, the wide- Co]umbia who have t
spread fear that the new Austro- being intellectually]
German union is only the first of a themselves and with
series of t-npe that will lead mi

he Faculty of
the power of
honest with
the under-

a'SG1.tG-7 vl r5l'L"Pwi LIlUb Will 1tUU 1Li

the near future to a union of a
more political nature and to th
eventual absorption of the dimin-
ished Austrian nation by the Ger-
man government. Any fears of thzi
nature are sufficient to send many
of the Continental leaders scurry-
ing to the cover of their post-War
balance-of-power theories and a-
greements and to urgently request
that the League of Nations, pseudo-
policeman of Europe, should inves-
tigate the entire provisions of the
proposed union.
The opposition of this variety
has come particularly from the
French and British foreign offices
in the persons of Aristide Briand
and Arthur Henderson. Both of
these men have sharply defined
their position and have demanded
that the League should supervise
the agreement. To their demands,
.the German foreign office has re--
mained adamantine. Julius Curtius
has even called a special session of
the Reich in which he defended his
attitude and, although he careful-

Li

:: graduates; the majority of the men
SJ who teach here are nothing more
- than mental ghouls, feeding vora-
ciously on the brains of dead men,
bringing forth their carrion before
s students who barely realize the co-
lossal shamelessness of the decep-
tion that is being carried on. The
number of those instructors who
are stimulators of thought can be
counted on the fingers of both
hands.
If there were any honesty in most
' of the instructors of Columbia Col-
lege they would have the common
decency to do what writers do when
they quote the thoughts of other
persons. They woud prefix their
statements with courtesy lines. If
this method were carried out there
would appear placards on each door
in Hamilton Hall.
"Professor John Smith will lec-
ture to his class at 2:30 p. m. Pro-
fessor Smith's lecture is given
through the courtesy of Plato, Aris-
totle, Locke, Helvetius, Newton,
Darwin, Stendhal, Proust and a lot
of others who sweated mentally in

,tatb vnft111 ialiy, LLti n-
without the ingenuity of the B & G. comes a more direct outlet for
About the middle of the afternoon melodic creation, and that because
there appeared on the streets a of its intimacy (plus its flexibility)
lovely old wagon drawn by three it becomes the ideal mediator be-
shuffling chargers. Just to make tween the composer's psychologic
sure that no one made any mis- state and its communication.
take about it there was a huge The task awaits someone and if
U. of M. emblazoned on its scaly the rumours are true that Herbert
sides, and it certainly did my heart Schwartz, formerly of this column,
' good . .. and incidentally gave me is making a study of Mozart, the
something to talk about. results will be eagerly awaited.
e * But be this as it may, Joseph
DAILY POEMS Wolfstahle, "a continental pianist,
Ever buzzing, ever flitting gives a splendid interpretation of'
Come the flies at springtides call. this concerto, and with completely
Professors' noses they will pester satisfactory orchestral support from
It's a fine world after all! Dr. Weissman. One would nearly
say that it was a perfect perform-
ance but then in the case of this
The Rolls Artist has just whiffled music one would not use the word
in with a picture of the thing I 'interpretation'. For this is music
mentioned above. He won't tell me that only can be played perfectly
what it is, but he says to run it by a child. In Wolfstahle's playing
with the caption . .. "One of The of this concerto one should not be-
D. K. E. Cistern" here it is. .. come aware of a feeling as I do
(granting that its correct), that the
playing of certain passages, for in-
stance the cadenza (Mozart) was
something carefully thought out,
well-planned. Music that is creat-
ed without the intermediacy of the
intellect must resent the mere pres-'
ence of the intellect in interpreta-
tion. The reason music like this
concerto, and some of the violin
music of Bach (in the case of Bach
because it is depersonalized and
therefore pure music) can be inter-
- ipreted so perfectly by children like
Ricci and Menuhin is that its com-
One of The D. K. E. Cistern prehension is not cortical but thala-
mic, i. e., not governed by intellec-
Well, life is kind of like that . . . tual resolution of experience, but
just ,as I always said. Here I go on by emotional awareness of form.
just struggling along every week One cannot be certain that any
scrimping and saving to buy myself recording of this concerto by an
a milk-shake at the Caucus (Cau- adult is strictly authentic.
eus-Fletcher, just in case you have- But this music is reality, and is

9
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