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April 02, 1931 - Image 4

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-02

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1931

- --

Published every morning except Monday
during the University year by the Board in
Control or Student Publications.
Member of Western Conference Editorial
Association.
The Associated Press is exclusively entitled
to the use for republication of all news dis-
patches credited to it or not otherwise credited
n this paper and the local news published
herein.
Entered at the postoffice at Ann Arbor,
Michigan, as second class matter. Special rate
of Postage granted by Third.Assistant Post-
ma~ter General.
Subscription by carrier, $4.00; by mail, $4.so.
Offices: Ann Arbor Press Building, Maynard
Street. Phones: Editorial, 4925;Business, 2rz21.
EDITORIAL STAFF
Telephone4921
MANAGING EDITOR
Chairman Editorial Board
HENRY MERRY
FlxAN E. Coom, City Eduit
News Editor ... ...........Gurney Williams
Editorial Director..........Walter W. Wilds
Sports Editor. ............ Joseph A. Russell
Women's Editor...........MaryL. Behymer
Mdusic, Drama, Books. ... Wm... W . Gorman
Assistant City Editor......Harold 0. Warren
SAsistant News Editor...Charles R. Sprowl
elegraph Editor . . re A. Stautej
Copy Editor..................'n. E. Pypes
NIGHT EDITORS
S. Beach Conger John D. Reindel
Carl S. Forsythe Charles R. Sprowl
David M. Nichol Richard L. Tobin
Harold 0. Warres

Campus Opinion
Contributors are asked to be brief,
confining themselves to less that. 300
words if possible. Anonymous com-
munications will be disregarded. The
names of communicants wili, however,
be regarded as confidential, upon re-
quest. Letters published should not be
construed as expressing the editorial
opinion of The Daily.
To the Editor:

.I

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SPOITs AssIsTANTs
Sheldon C. Fullerton J. Cullen Kennedy
10 Charles A. Sanford
REPORTERS
Thomas M. Cooley Wilbur J. Meyers
Morton Frank Brainard W. Nies
Saul Friedberg Robert L. Pierce
Frank B. Gilbretki Richard Racine
Roland Goodman Jerry E. Rosenthal
Morton Helper Karl Seiffert
Bryan Jones George A. Stauter
Denton C. Kunze Tohn W. Thomas
Powers Moulton John S. Townsend
Eileen Blunt Mary McCall
Nanette Dembiti Cile Miller
Elsie Feldman Margaret O'Brien
Ruth Gallmeyer Eleanor Rairdon
Emily G. Grimes Anne Margaret Tobin
0an ev Margaret Thompson
roty vMagee Claire Trussell

One of the perpetual storm cen-
ters of faculty and student contro-
versy is again nearing a low pres-i
sure period. Ever since the system
of marking by letters was intro-
duced at Michigan, about 30 years
ago, there has been agitation for
a return to grades of "passing,"
"failing," and perhaps one of
"passed with honor." At present a
faculty committee of the literary
college, headed by Dean Humph-
reys, is considering the question.
The student body, although vitally
affected by the whole matter, has
not responded to the extent that it
should. This no doubt has been
caused by a lack of appreciation of
the issues involved.
The question, it seems to us, goes
deeper than the mechanics of
grades. It involves all of the ideals
of liberal education. We are being
asked whether we prefer achieve-
ment to be measured by'ability to
memorize and mouth, or by the
degree of true cultural attainment
and height of reasoning shown. As
long as the deadly A to E arrange-
ment persists, just so long will the
University remain an education
factory. The loafers, here for con-
ventional or social reasons, will
continue to squeeze through on C
minuses, and the uninspired book-
slaves will drag down their A's
Meanwhile the person. with some
ideals of culture and intelligent
learning will feel stifled.
Instead of all this, the faculty, it
backed by strong student opinion
can have the power to introduce e
sincere policy. If the simple ar-
rangement mentioned in the firsi
paragraph is adopted, standard.
can be raised to eliminate the per-
sons on the edge. There need bE
less fear of failure to memorize al
lessons perfectly. There can be th
opportunity to do some sincere
scholarly, and more than superfi
cial studying. There will 'of cours'
always be the problem of the per
son who barely get by, but hi
standards will have to be highel
And the really superior student, a
one faculty member has pointer
out, will finally receive adequat
recognition. R. G., '32.

LTODAY IS
SNOT APRIL
FIRST
but yesterday was, as anyone
could easily see by glancing at the
advertisement that Gargoyle ran.1
One side of it said GNIRPS -. -.
just like that. Of course, I think
that nothing is nicer than a little
April Fool joke every now and then
(preferably every April Fool's Day)
but I do think that that sort of
thing is carrying it a bit too far.
?F * *
One of our well known Hum-
or magazines has discovered
that it can print what chorus
girls think of college men and
get a lot of very fine advertis-
ing done. Through the kind of-'
fices of ELMER we have discov-
ered that we cannot print what
college men think of chorus
girls . . . which is just another
disadvantage of being mid-vic-
torian (one who rides around
in the center of one of those
silly old carriages).
The B & G Boys have another
laurel to add to their trophy list.
Surely you know what laurels are?
Well, I can't explain it very well
but they seem to have something
to do with steam-shovels . . . you
know they call that building over
across from the Union the 'Laurel
Club.' Anyway, in the quadrangle
where all those four-eyed people do
their wrangling the boys planted a
lovely row of Ash Trees . . . at least
I guess they were ash trees because
when they were hauling them over
there they were always ashing each
other what they were . . . and they
got one of them three inches ou
of line which necessitated digging
the whole thing up again along
with a few yards of lovely sidewalk
tj k

Queen in Barrymore's "Hme, .D '
for her Ibsen revivals, and for her 3I4 South State St.
recent appearance in "Lysistrata")
in the title role of a production of
Sophocles' "Electra," the choreo-
graphy of which will be directed by WATI
Martha Graham of the Dance Re-'LERC
'pertory Theatre. The second week
of the festival, Miss Yurka will be HAY
the star in a play as yet unan-
nounced which will receive its Mem
American premier here in Ann Ar- New York St
bor. The third week will see Tom Detroit Stoc
Powers (late virtuoso of "The Ap- New York Cur
ple-cart" in the Theatre Guild pro-
duction) and Violet Kemble-Cooper Deale
(of the "Lysistrata" cast) as co-
stars in the first production outside Invest
New York of Noel Coward's "PRI- Secui
VATE LIVES," which is being so
, brilliantly received now with Cow- Account
ard and Gertrude Lawrence in the for C
leading roles. The last two weeks
of the season, these two will ap- Mezzani
pear in some plays, the possibili- FIRST N4
ties being considered Silvara's "Ca- BANK
o price" and Shaw's "The Great Phones: 2
a, Catherine."
Mr. Henderson, who is complet-
e ing the plans for this group of pro-
r ductions is at present playing at
z the Copley Theatre, Boston; and
has been recently engaged as as-
t sociate director, to succeed Alexan-w
Sder Kirkland, of the summer sea-
9 son at the Berkshire Playhouse,
. Stockbridge, Massachusetts. Defin- C a:
itive plans for the Ann Arbor Fes-
Odi ' wi ti 1%-nivuiuu- ii-uii -- .

RILL
Phone 6615
LING
iEN&
"ES
bers
ock Exchange
k Exchange
Ab (Associate)
ers in
tment
rities
: Carried
lients

MU SIC AND DRAMA
PROFESSIONAL DRAMA IN MAY
Word comes from Robert Hender-
son, director of last year"s Drama-
tic Festival, that negotiations are
being made for its repetition this
year. The first week will mark, it
is thought, the appearance of
Blanche Yurka (well-known as the

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SUBSCRIBE TO THE MICHIGAN DAILY

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BUSINESS STAFF
Telephone 212~4
T. HOLLSTER MAnLEY, Business 3fuagver
KAsIa 1$. HALVERSON, Assistant Msa aer
DEPARTMENT MANAGERS
Advertising ... ........... Charles T. Kline
Advertising..............Thomas M. Davis
Advertising ............William W. Warboys
Service .. ..............Norris 3.Johnson
Publication ............Robert W. Williamson
Circulation..............Marvin S. Kobacker
Accounts-----------Thomas S. Muir
Business Secretary............Mary J. Kenan
Assistants

MOX0

,. - . . _ ._ .._ ___ __________________________________ I

Y

Your Feet

si

Harry R. Begley
Vernon Bishop
William Brown
Robert Callahan
William W. Davis
Richard H. Hiller'
Miles Hoisington
Ann W. Verner
Marian Atran
Helen Bailey
Josephine Convissd
Maxine Fishgrund
Dorothy LeMire
Dorothy Laylin

Erle Kightlinger
Don W. Lyon
William Morgan
Richard Stratemeiest
Keith TTrer
Noel D. Turner
Byron C. Vedder
Sylvia Mille
Hielen Oisen
Mildred Postal
Marjorie Rougli
Mary E. Watts
Johanna Wiese

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1931
Night Editor - HAROLD WARREN
"COURSES, NOT CLASSES"
Yale's new plan of study, thor-
oughly publicized in its merits, is'
beginning to wear through in em-
barrassing places. The latest loop-
hole to be found is the selection of
two-hour courses and their assimi-
lation into the new plan. Too val-
uable to be dropped, and naturally
of -insufficient material to fill out

To the Editor:
In view of certain recent happen-
ings it seems no more than just,
that the good people of Ann Arbor
be approached for an explanation.
During the past week the heads
of fraternity and sorority houses,
receivedcertain telephone calls.
Upon answering the phone they:
were confronted with this proposi-
tion.

the maximum six hours which the A voice informed the house presi-
new plan calls for, the problem is dent that the unemployment situa-
an acute one indeed. The Yale tion in Ann Arbor had become more
News wants to know why "they serious than had been anticipated.
shouldn't be given regular, full The voice then went on to say that
credit" for in every way "it is the the City, in its chivalrous efforts to
courses that count, not the classes." ameliorate the condition of its un-
--employed, was calling upon the
For the past ten years the truth
of this statement has been more Green letter groups for help, and
and more evident to the middle- would the president of the house
western collegian. No matter how please see that his house was rep-
many tinmegan.eek atclass hayresented at a meeting at the Union
many times a week a class maythtenig
meet, it is doubtful if all three hour that evening?
courses are worth more than a If the above stated idea was the
great number of two hour elections, beit well- some half-baked, al-
and it is still more doubtful if the ite meaning) student, the
credit given is equally earned writer has no quarrel.
But if some city official, or any
throughout the two groups. At other Ann Arbor townsman in any
Harvard and Yale a professor gives way representative of civic senti-
as many lectures a week as he feels ment, has had the gall to make
necessary to cover the ground in such a plea to the students of the
his course, regardless of its 'pre- University he should be informed
scribed hours of credit. Thus, if a right speedily how matters stand.
pithy subject requires three full Surely a city cannot call down
hours of lecture for its completion nation-wide infamy upon a group

Which reminds us strangely
of the way they sodded the
whole plot in there last Spring
so that they could drive nice
trucks over it all Summer and
Fall.
DAILY POEM
See it snow! It must ue spring-
time.-
Flowers in the crannied wall!
Mud in everybody's shoetops .
It's a fine world after all!
Speaking of which causes me
tci remark that one swallow
couldn't make a Summer out of
this if he had three months to
work in and an option on the
equator.
ECONOMICS ..d. CORRUPTIN
IAgain we arc indebted to ELMER
for the following. He was discuss-
ing the Laundry Bill question with
a young lady who works on one of
'Michigan's leading annuals (The
'Ensian, in case you couldn't guess)
and happened to remark that he
got six dollars credit a year on his
bills for some work he was doing.
"Six dollars!" the young lady was
heard to exclaim, "Why I could pay
for my laundry for a whole year
out of that!" . . . And she probably
could..
Which brings us right around to
the question of what the D.O. B. is
coming to these days. The faculty
is getting so wild for easy publicity
that the Daily Bulletin now takes
up the greater part of two pages in-
stead of the former half page that
they used in the good old days. I
never read the silly drivel anyway.
It is so full of tasty items about or-
gan recitals, events for the coming
semester, and announcements from
Gertie the scrub woman in the Ed-
ucation School to whom it may con-
cern about when the students much
ado about nothing league is to meet
that I never can find anything I
want to know anyway. It is much
easier to call up someone and find
out. ,
OLD BLACK JOE DEPT.
TIHE GARGOYLE, Campus Smut
Organ is out today. Buy one and
astonish your friends ... they never
would have thought it of you.
There is
Just
One thing about
This
Modern free
Verse and that is that
It does take up a lot of space
If
You
Handle it right
And
Make the most of your
Opportunities.
WOULD *OUT K ,TOTAKE A

Liv'ai win oe annauncect -nortiy. 1111

HENRY COWELL
Henry Cowell who lectures to-
morrow afternoon at 4:15 in the
Mendelssohn Theatre is one of the
l most brilliant of the younger com-
posers, as the awarding to him of
the Guggenheim scholarship a few
days ago clearly indicates. Besides
composition, however, he has iden-
tified himself in several important
capacities (as author of a book
"New Musical Resources" and edi-
tor of the magazine "New Music")
with the effort to spread a more
intelligent attitude toward the aims
and achievements of the more mod-
ern composers. His lecture Friday
will be primarily on this topic and
will be illustrated by him at the
piano.
DANCE RECITAL PROGRAM
Ronny Johanssen, the Swedish
dancer, who is to appear in the
Mendelssohn Theatre S a t u r d a y
night in the third of the dance re-
citals sponsored by the League has
announced the following program.
Miss Johanssen will be assisted by
Pauline Pettibone at the piano.
Menuet ................ Paderewski
a Allegro energico .......Palmgren
b Song .................... Bartok
Piano Solo; Scherzo . .Mendelssohn
W altz ..................... Strauss
All Marcia .......... Rachmaninow
Piano Solo Witches.......Wilckens
Polka .................. Glazounow
INTERMISSION
Javanese Impressions .............
..............Original Melodies'
.arr. by Seelig.
Piano Solo Legend..-......Albeniz
La Danse-.................Debussy
Piano Soli Hurdy Gurdy) . .Goosens
Music Box)
a Impromptu ............... Grieg
b Scherzo-...................Gade
Rustic Dance-................Grieg
FESTIVAL PROGRAMS
Two Festival programs have been
announced, those including the two
outstanding stars of the Festival,
Lily Pons, sensationally y o u n g
French soprano who has made an
exciting debut at the Metropolitan
this season, and Ignace Jan Pa-
derewski, whose final American
tour was extended to include his'
appearance here in May.
Miss Pons will appear three times
f on the program, singing, Mozart's
aria "Oui, tu vois en moi une rivale"
from "The Magic Flute," "Caro
Nome" from Verdi's "Rigoletto,"
and the intricate aria The Bell
Song from Delibes' "Lakme," which
she has recently recorded very bril-
liantly. The orchestra will fill out
this Wednesday concert with Dvor-
ak's overture "Husitzka," Chaus-
son's Symphony in B fiat major,
Borodin's "A Sketch of the Steppes
of Central Asia," and Johann

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UNIVERSITY OF MIC FIGAN ORATORICAL ASSOCIAT'N
Presents
-1C

hdw

---'- .0' 0=
/ --

A Hero of
World
Distinction

In "My
Buccaneering
Cruise"

withnm a semester, three lectures
are given each week. If, however,
a two hour election can be covered
with one lecture a week, or a three
hour with one lecture and one quiz
every other week, the professor in
charge calls classes at those times
and no oftener.
The Yale plan is all well and
good for the general educational
trend, the comprehensive study of
a field, but a question arises as to
whether or not these short, one and
two hour courses, put in because
of their individual importance, can
ever be displaced by the wider
scope. In our opinion there is noth-
ing more important than the ex-
hilaration of a pleasing, self-satis-
fying course, whether one hour or
five, a course which carries one,
along at a rapid rate in a special
field of interest to a few students.
The necessity of such courses is too

of young people, and incidentally
seriously inconvenience a number
of this group, and then in return
expect these same young people to
open up their hearts to a cause
which is, in the final analysis, not
theirs.
The , City hadn't enough to do
without meddling in student af-
fairs a short time back; and a
beautiful mess resulted. Now that
the City finds itself with more on
its officious hands than it can well
handle, the students' help is en-
listed!
The student body has ever shown
itself ready and willing to support
any worthy project. The Fresh Air
Camp is a witness to this. But in
this instance the City may possibly
find that student affairs are suffi-
cient to keep the students occupied
with their own business, a practice
which certain police commissioners
in flea O~-iu of Ann Arhnr wniid

The GER AN SEA DEVIL

onight

April 2nd

Hill Auditorium-8:00

Series ticket holders will be admitted on the same ticket used for the
___.- _ - .R...

I

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