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April 02, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-04-02

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0

THURSDAY, APRIL 2, 1931

THE, MICHIGAN

D A T

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'THE MICHIGAN TYAIEY

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C, LCEY TALKE
ON BilKER IUMF
INRADIOADRESS
Says Camp Davis Offers Chance
for Surveying Instruction
Under Sest Conditions.
MANY COURSES OFFERED
Cites Need of Trained Engineers
to Carry on Improved
Methods.
Prof. Clifton O. Carey, of the en-
gineering college, discussed Camp
Davis, the surveying camp which
is sponsored each year by the Uni-
versity as a part of the Summer
Session, yesterday from the campus
broadcasting studio.
"Within the last decade there
has been an increased realization
of the importance of accurate, sci-
entific surveys," he said. "The spe-
cifications under which surveying
work is done today are more exact-
ing than at any time in the past,
and surveys of the future are to be
more exacting than those of the
present."
Prcfessor Carey stated that it is
therefore the duty of the engineer-
ing colleges to train men who will
be able to carry on the improved
surveying methods. For men who
are properly prepared in the fun-
damental science, Camp Davis, af-
fords an opportunity for training
in surveying under unusually favor-I
able conditions, he said.
The camp was organized only for
the purpose of teaching surveying.
Professor Carey p o i n t e d out
that the exercises are conducted as
nearly as possible under the same
conditions as in practical field work.
The courses offered in the camp
give instrtuction in many types of
surveyig problems, such as, topo-
graphical surveys, public land sur-
veys, route surveys, route surveys
for railway, highway, and canal lo-
cation, cross-section work, base-line
measurement, triangulation, tunnel
surveys, bridge location, dam loca-
tion, 'irrigation surveys, astronomi-
cal observations to determine time,
azimuth, latitude and longitude,
and adjustment of instruments.
QUEENS COLLEGE-A cigarette
dropped in the girls' cloak room
started a fire here which destroyed
the old arts building.
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH
SHOP
WE SELL SO
E SERVICE Radios
Tel. 2-2812 615 E. Williams
XPER
WATC H
REPAIRIN
Sste Sree eelr

UNIVERSITY SCIENTIST INV EST IGATES
PERIOD OF MAYAN INDIAN CULTURE
Discrepancies in Ancient Dating and yea. h e, nmix 5(0 yearsj

r
i

-- *: -

FR ENCH UDE nTS|L r

PHYSICISTS MANUF ACTURE CRYSTALS
TO HELP STUDY OF INFRA RED RAYS

Hamburg Professor
Talks at Economic

System Found by Dr. Carl
E. Guthe.

When was the Mayan civilization
at its height? Dr. Carl E. Guthe,
director of the University museum
of zoology, would like to know.
Three different theories setting
the living period of the ancient In-
dians have developed from the re-
search of seven archaeologists, due
to the several methods of co-ordi-
nating the Mayan and Christian
calendars. Dr. Guthe will review
the evidence of the three computed
chronologies, and try to correlate
them correctly, mainly through cal-
'culations of astronomy and mathe-
matics.
The discrepancies in fixing dates
-arise from the partial destruction
of evidences of the Mayan system
of marking time. Their calendar,
an arbitrary but orderly succession
of days and months, was set with-
out regard to natural phenomena.
The Indians counted their days in
groups of 360, called a tun, similar
in length to our year, but they fur-
ther counted their tuns in groups
of 20 called a katun, and contain-
ing 7,200 days.
However, through partial destruc-
tion of the records on their monu-
ments and in their chronicles, or
through the Indians' failure to
mark complete dates on the rec-
ords, archaeological finds have been
dated inaccurately with the largest
time units issuing from the rec-
ords. A parallel situation would
have an American tombstone record
the death of a man as having oc-
curred on "Wednesday, the 25th,
but neglect to mention the month
b

k
t
3
C
l

from now would e unmce to ascer- I U I IUL lvi U WiL L
tam the exact d t ol dhe Ameri-
can's death.
Desire to determine such prob- Bach's Concerto n D Minor
lems as whether te building of Arranged 'for Soiree
the early Mayan period p;.ralleled Tomorrow.
the architectural dcveloprment of otno
'early Christian era, as actuated Bach's Concerto in D Minor, a-
Dr. Guthe's research work, which is ranged for two violins and a piano,
estimated may take more than a will be presented at the annual
year's time to complete.Ce
He has been given permission by musicale soiree of te Cercle Fran-
the University administration to i ito be held at 8 lcock tomor.-
devote a portion of his time to re- row night in the Ahumni room of
viewing the evidence and argu- the League building.
ments concerning the correlation Mrs. Otto P. Graf, who holds the
between Mayan and C h r i s t i a n Guilliard fellowship here will ren-
I chronology, at the request of theI tia musicwshptheensem-
Carnegie institution of Washington der the piano music for the ensem-
and the Peabody museum of Hari -ble. Mrs. Graf studied piano un-
vard. der Guy Maier.
_r Emilio C a l v a c ca, Grad., and'
Comedy Club Try-outs Charles N. Staubach, Grad., will
Attract 15 Aspirants play the violin scores. Calvacca is
a student of Maxiliam Pilzer, of
Fifteen candidates were present New York, where he studied for
at Sarah Caswell ^ An a11 oll t I

Greater Transparency for Heat
Gained by Using Synthetic
Material.
Growing crystals larger and bet-
ten than nature's product to facil-
itate the study of the little-known
heat spectrum lying outside the
range visible as light has become a
specialty with the physics depart-
ment of the University, whose prod-
ucts are in demand by other scien-
tific workers and universities.
The principles involved in the
production of crystals have been
known for a long time, according
to Prof. H. M. Randall, of the de-
partment, but the art of producing
successfully large crystals free from
flaws has only been successful in
recent years and then only at a
few places.
Research on the intra-red or ;heat
waves, which lie beyond visibility
on the opposite end of the spectrum
from the much discussed ultra-
violet rays, led to the artificial pro-
duction of crystals at the Univer-
sity. Natural erv stalst of t rfi.. f~

a result the department has found Club MeH
it necessary to turn to the manu-
facture of artificial crystals which
will be transparent to these longer Comparing the work of Englar
heat radiations. and Germany with reference to a
The largest single crystals so far bitration boards, Professor The
made have been cylindrical in form, dore F. S. L. Plaut, of the Unlve
from five to six inches in diameter sity of Hamburg, spoke before tl
and from four to five inches tall. Economics club at the Union Moi
In continuing this work the de- clay night.
partment hopes to make crystals of In tracing the history of arbitr
two or three times the size already tion boards, DT. Plaut cited th
obtained, and possibly to discover in England the arbitration commi
any materials transparent to still. tee arose due to a religious infli
longer wave lengths than are these- ence-particularly a Puritian infli
materials. Crystals have become a, ence-whereas in Germany, it w,
subject of ever-increasing interest more largely the outcome of ti
to scientists and the department strife between capital and labc
has received requests from a num- The English labor group is of
ber of universities for samples of more conservation temperamer
its crystals. and this explains why radicalis
The earlier attempts to grow secured a lesser toll in Englar
crystals of solution materials were than in Germany, added Dr. Plau
mostly from their water solutions.
As the water was evaporated the UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-
materials crystalized out much as "With Fire and Sword," an anon:
sugar crystalizes in syrup. But these mous scandal sheet, appeared c
methods in spite of all precautions the campus a few days ago. A rf
more often resulted in the forma- ward of $50 has been offered fc
tion of an aglomeration of many arrest and conviction of the au
small crystal instead of a large one. thors of the publication.

I

jDV . v u a

"g l erU- 'more than five years. orite, and rc
day afternoon from 4 to 6 o'clock Richard J. Payne, '31, and Bur- to result in
to try out for membership in the nette Bradley, '32, will open the of the spect
Comedy club. j program with a few short selec- region. Th
The eetig i thefirt oftwowere not 01
The meeting Js the first of two ltions. Mrs. Charles E. Koella, who size. Moreo
tryouts held to determine who will has studied in Oslo and is known opaque with
be asked to join the club. Those for her Scandinavian songs, is also preciable po
candidates who are approved this on the program for three operatic spectrum rer
time are asked to tryout again at selections. these methoc
the meeting to be held next Thurs-
day. Each member must try out I
twice before he is admitted into
the club.
The spring tryout is one of two, lan 1 Eat Your
held annually by the club for those
wishing to join. The other tryout
is held in the fall.
Easter D in"LI

'Iy3G U1uar z, nu-
ock salt were first used
a material extension
rum into the infra-red
ese crystals, however,
btainable in sufficient
ver, they too became
the result that an ap-
rtion of the infra-red
naimed unattainable by
ids of investigation. As

To NEW Y04

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-tac .1e

2

: s
es
~'e
Co.
TRVE URA

MOST STYLES NOW $9.00 INSTEAD OF $10.00
(A FEW SPECIALS AT $10.00, INSTEAD OF $11.00)

QUALITY, STYLE AND WORKMANSHIP BETTER THAN EVER
THE CAMPUSB T R-s.Ytt

I ',.,.i

TODAY IS THE LAST DAY TO PAY YOUR CLASS DUES AND TO SUBCRI BE TO
"THEF MICHIGAN ALUMNUS" AT THIS REMARKABLY LOW PRICE. BE SURE YOU PAY
THEM NOW OR YOU WILL NOT FIND YOUR NAME IN THE CLASS ANNOUNCEMENTS,
THIS ALSO CONCLUDES THE CAMPUS SALE OF " THE ALUMNUS" AT THIS

PRICE-THE ONE THING YOU CANNOT AFFORD TO PASS UP.

"Every Senior a subscriber to

I he Alum .us, and a Lifelong

lkrI r I 0 r * .. e

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