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March 26, 1931 - Image 3

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-26

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URSDAY, MARCH 26, 1931 THE MICHIGAN DAILY-PAEH

PAGE TH:

Music

School Will

s Unit of Uni versty Summer Session

CAAOU FESCHICAGO, CO-ED, VIEWS SK1TO
DISCO VERED BY KA 00 FP iL ON![
EXTENSIVE CHO-ICE
CULTUAL PRGRAMDr.

College Operated Separate Fron
Group for 38 Years Prior
to 1930.
TEACHERS ATTRACTED
Students May Elect Subjects i
Other Departments; Credit
May be Acquired
When the 1931 Summer Session
opens June 29 it will mark th
second consecutive apeparance of
the School of Music as a unit of the
University offering courses during
the regular eight-week summer
term. For the preceding 38 years
instruction has been offered by the
University School of Music in its
own summer session.
Wider opportunities for cultural
contacts, and a more compreaen-
aive list of courses in the several
fields of music instriction will be
o-ered this summer under the new
arrangement, states the catalogue
prepared by the music school for
prospective students.
Students enrolled in the School
of Music for the Summer Session
may also elect courses in other
schools and colleges in the Uni-
versity without paying an addi-
tional fee.
Courses will be offered to meet
the needs of students who wish to
shorten the time necessary to com-
plete courses leading to the degree
in music; students in other schools
and colleges who wish to study
.music for purely cultural purposes,
;and those who wish to apply credit
earned for such study towards the
bachelor of arts, or the bachelor of
science degree.
Variety of Courses.
Professional musicians, supervis-
ors of music in public schools, and
private teachers who wish to
broaden their training in a specific
subject or department will also find
courses especially fitted to their
needs.
The individual instruction courses
range from elementary to advanced
grades in piano, voice, violin, vio-
loncello, organ, and the principal
orchestral instruments. Methods of
class instruction for beginners in
piano are offered as well as class
courses for adult beginners in string
instruments and wood and brass
winds.
There are no formal admission
requirements to the Summer Ses-
sion of this school. Courses will be
open to all persons qualified to pur-
sue them. Students from other col-
leges and universities are required
to present a statement for an ad-
ministrative officer showing they
are in good standing in the institu-
tion in which they are regularly
enrolled.
Summer Faculty List.
The Summer Session staff will in-
clude Charles A. Sink, president;
Earl V. Moore, musical director;
David E. Mattern, professor of pub-
lic school music; Wassily Besekir-
sky, professor of violin; Guy Maier,
professor of piano; Palmer Chris-
tian, professor of organ; Mabel
;Ross Rhead, assistant professor of
piano.
James Hamilton, assistant pro-
fessor of voice; Anthony J. Whit-
mire, assistant professor of violin;
Joseph Brinkman, instructor in,
piano; Margaret Diefenthaeler, in-
structor of piano pedagogy; Frank
Showers, instructor in public school
music; Hanns Pick, professor of
Violoncello; Nell B. Stockwell, in-
structor in piano; Lucile G. Schoen-
feld, instructor in piano; Nicholas
Falcone, instructor in wind instru-
ments; Thelma Lewis, instructor in
voice; Thelma Newell, instructor in
violin; Louise Cuyler, instructor
in theory.
Hunter Johnson, instructor in
theory; Henry Buyterdorp, assist-
ant in trombone and contra bass;
Earl A. Slocum, assistant in flute;

Paul Thebaud, assistant in oboe
and bassoon; Winchester Richard,
librarian of the orchestra; Ralph
Fulghum, assistant in cornet and
trumpet; Philip Cox, assistant in
French horn, and Kenneth Osborne,
assistant in theory.

Associated Press Photo
Miss Manota Marohn, University of Chicago co-ed, viewing the
skeleton of a "pareiassur" found by a university expedition to the Karoo
desert of South Africa. This specimen is the first of its kind mounted
in the United States.

SELL-ING RAPIDLY
Invitations Distributed to 1,000
Students, Faculty Members
and Prominent Citizens.
Tickets for the ninth annual
Gridiron banquet, to be held April
8 at the Union, are being sold
rapidly, Edward S. McKay, '32,
treasurer of Sigma Delta Chi, spon-
sor organization, announced yester-
day.
The price for the 1931 banquet

What's Going on
THEATRES
Majestic-"Big Money," with Ed-
die Quillan, Robert Armstrong, and
James Gleason.
Michigan-"Little Caesar," with
Douglas Fairbanks, jr., and E. G.
Robinson.
Wuerth -"Scarlet Pages," with
Elsie Ferguson, Grant Withers, and
Marion Nixon.
GENERAL
All-Campus Forum-Ira M. Smith
will speak on. "Our Present System
of Marking," 4:15 o'clock, room D;
Alumni hall.
Lecture-Prof. George G. Brown
on "Relation of Good Gasoline to
Wnfn rfnrrmr PcP " 7 . fl nflnr lr
M t.LU~J PL fL UI1'~, 4.)

7'_-

vot or rer orrmanice, 1:'J CIOCK
has been reduced to $2.50, the first room 3201, East Engineering build- $20,000,000 Loaned
time in history that the dinner and ing. ,d
entertainment have been offered Wesleyan Guild - Informal dis- Drouth Area Farmers
for less than $3. Invitations to the cussion, 4 o'clock, Wesley hall. -
banquet ,'have all been sent out, Concert-Varsity band, 8:15 o'- WASHINGTON, Mar. 25.--(iP)-
' clock, Hill auditorium. Nearly $20,000,000 in loans have
more than 1,000 having been distri- been approved for farmers in the
buted to members of the student Martial La Peils drouth area.
body, faculty, state and city offi- rG. L. Hoffman, chief of the farm-
cials, and nationally known figures. i Perr After Revolt ers' seed loan office, said thousands
The program, to be comprised of of applications were reaching the
skits and an all-campus movie, as LIMA, Peru, Mar. 25.--(P)-Mar- agriculture department daily. He
well as the usual short speeches by tial law continued to prevail in expressed the belief the total of
visitors, has been completed and is revolt-torn Lima today following $57,000,000 available for loans direct.
being rehearsed at the present time. the bloodshed Monday night when to fai'mers would be taken up.
The skits will burlesque recent the cannons of the Samanez Ocam- Hoffman said only a few of the
campus events and personalities of po government troops swept the loans approved from the $10,000,000
the University limelight because of barrack of the fifth regiment of in- fund for agricultural rehabilitation
occurrences and policies adhered fantry, which had rebelled. were for food.
to during the semester just past. -_-_-_-_-

9

The major attraction of the eve-
ning is the presentation of the oil-
can, traditional award to the fac-
ulty member whose publicity has
gained him nation-wide recogni-
tion during the last year, and who
needs, in the opinion of the com-
mittee, a "razzing" by the students,
the townspeople, and the faculty
in general. The eight previous hold-
ers of the oilcan, whose names were
engraved upon the trophy, will be
portrayed by oil characateurs done
by "Lichty," art editor of the Gar-
goyle in 1928-29. The portraits will
form the background for the deco-
ration of the Union ballroom, where
the event is annually held.
Another award, given annually to
the man whose work has been
:2pecially meritorious during the
last year, and known as the favor-
able epitaph, will also be presented
at the ;banquet. Prof. Moses Gom-
berg, of the chemistry department,
was the last to receive this award.
Forensic Organization
Takes 16 New Pledges
Alpha Nu, literary forensic socie-
ty,' admitted 16 students to mem-
bership Tuesday night. Two of the
initiates, F. W. Spikerman, '32, and
Bernard E. Schnacke, '34, led an
open forum discussion on the third
party movement at the meeting.
Other new members are Charles
Seda, '32, Leo Walker, '34, Henry
Hajek, '32, Walter Bury, '33, Clint
Sandusky, '34, Arthur Hawkins, '34,
Hubert Horne, '32, C. P. Korzuck,
'32Ed., H. G. Seamns, '33E, D. R.
Thomas, '32, Douglas Welch, '32,
Alfred Palmer, '32, Gayle Chaffin,
'32, Richard Minnich, '34, A. P. Ter-
ryberry, '33, and Joseph Monehan,
'33.

rI

School of
Concrts
(No Admission Charge)
THE VARSITY BAND, Nicholas
Falcone, Conductor, Thursday,
March 26, 8:15, Hill Auditorium.
ROBERT CRANDALL, Pianist,
B U R N E T T E BRADLEY, So.
prano, stndents' recital, Friday,
March 27, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY, Violin-
ist and MABEL ROSS RHEAD,
Pianist, faculty concert, Sunday,
March 29, 4:15Mendelssohn
Theatre.
KATE KEITH FIELD, Gradua-
tion recital, Wednesday, April 1,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
STUDENTS' RECITAL, students
of Thelma Newell, Violinist and
Lucile Garham Sc ho en feld,
Pianist, Wednesday, April 1, 7:45,
School of Music Auditorium.
PALMER CHRISTIAN, Organ.
ist, Faculty Concert (Good Friday
Music) Friday, April 3, 4:15, Hill
Auditorium.
JOSEPH BRINKMAN, Pianist,
Faculty Concert, Sunday, April 5,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
BERTHA HILDEBRAND, Pi-
anist, Student's Recital, Tuesday,
April 7, 8:15, School of Music
Auditorium.
STANLEY FLETCHER, Pianist,
Student's Recital Thursday, April
9, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
THELMA NEWELL, Violinist,
LOUISE NELSON, Pianist, Fac-
ulty concert, Sunday, April 26,
4:15, Mendelssohn Theatre.
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO,
Faculty Concert, Wassily Besekir-
sky. Violinist. Hanns Pick. Violon-

;

DANC
Tonite and Every Night Except
Sunday and Monday

Crr~qn 6cr' . Railrnrn II

1111

1111

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