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March 22, 1931 - Image 2

Resource type:
Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-22

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THE MICHIGAN

DAILY

SUNDAY, MARCH 22, 1931

THE MICHIGAN DAILY
SIR HUBERT WILKINS PLANS ROUTE

SIR HU E RT WILKINS PLANS ROUT E
OF SUBMARINE NORTH POLE CRUISE
smesomemm S

1 flEU STA
Fred Tara Changes Decision; to
Deliver Testimony for
State.
L ETROIT, Ma r. 21.-(A)--Fred
Tara, state witness in the trial of
Ted Pizino, Angelo Livecchi and
Joe Bomrarito for the murder of
Cerald . Buckley, announced from
hs cell in the county jail Friday
i that he is now anxious to
take the witness stand again and
o~cu< hnself of the contempt for
which he was given an indefinite
sentenc Wednesday.
Ta:a refused to submit to cross-
examination after giving testimony
linking Pizzino and Livecchi with
the murder of the radio announcer
early this morning of July .23. Sent,
'to jail, he started a hunger strike
which did not end until Friday and'
made what was described by his
guards as an attempt to end his
life.

COMING OF SPRNG ENDS WARMEST,
DRIEST WINTER SEASON ON RECORD
March Snowfall Almost Equalled I And, in the oinion of the United
Previous Total; B. and G. States weather bureau at Washing-
Boys Have Easy Time. ton, it was the warmest winter on
record. It was also the driest, too. C
ByG.yS. IIn Michigan, it was the driest
Whether or not you re already te in history. Unusually mild
aware of it, yesterday was the first
day of spring. at times, the precipitation of mois-
Winter made its final bow, with- ture was only about 70 per cent of
out any flourishes, at exactly 9:05 normal, according to the forecast-A
o'clock. That is the time the sun, ers. c
local astronomers said, passed the
Vernal equinox. The mildness of the w i n t e r Is
v l imonths was especially noticeable in t
Ann Arbor. Few times, if any, did i
rir ' the thee moneter drop to anythingIO
ii
IMULLLII q 1 ,A like sub-zero weather.
Even the B. and G. department1
had little to do in the way of clear- t
ing the University's si dew a 1k s. $
Nearly as much snow fell during
Chancellor Succumbs to the last 2 days of winter thisI
FormerChacellrSucummonth as has been recorded all sea-v
Long Illness; Signed son.-
Versailles Pact. At any rate, such a winter was u
_the best kind to follow a dry sum-
BERLIN, Mar. 21.-(P)-The hand mer, the weather bureau said.
which, unflinching, wrote the prin-
cipal German signature to the RADIO AMATEURS
treaty of Versailles, was stilled to- TO HEAR HOBBS
day in death.T
Succumbing to a long illness, Dr.
Hermann Mueller, twice German Explorer to Discuss Experiences
chancellor and one of the two or With Wireless Enthusiasts.
three most influential men of Ger-
man post-war politics, passed away Prof. William H. Hobbs will talk
at 10:45 p. in., Friday. He was 54 to the University Radio club on
1 years old. Wednesday evening, using for his
He was in a comotose condition subject "The Explorer and the
for several hours preceding the end, Radio Amateur." Professor Hobbs
which was brought about by throm- has led four expeditions into the
bosis of the liver, complicated by arctic regions and all of them have
pneumonia. A bladder operation relied cn amateur radio for com-
Ilast Saturday failed to aid him, munication with the civilized world.
Dr. Mueller first was German The speaker will tell of his ex-
chancellor for three months in periences with amateur radio oper-
1920. He came to power the second ators and the necessity for train-
time in June, 1928, remaining in ing among non-professional wire-
office until March, 1930, when the less enthusiasts. The meeting will
I present chancellor, Dr. Bruening, be held at 7:30 o'clock in room 304
succeeded him, of the Union. All interested are
Stigmatized by Nationalists for urged to attend.
havingx signed the "war guilt lie."-

!REASURY REPORTS
NMCOME TAX DROP,
.ollections to March 19 Total
$44,178,143, Compared With
$70,653,867 Last Year.
WASHINGTON, Mar. 21.-(IP)-
knother sharp drop in income tax
ollections as compared with the
ame day last year, shown today in
he Treasury's statement for March
.9, further increased apprehension
)f Treasury officials that the total
ncome tax receipts this year would
be below $400,000,000.
The amount reported March 19
otaled $44,178,143, compared with
X70,652,867 last year.
The c ol l e c t i o n brought the
month's total to $239,123,891, almost
$150,006,000 below that for the same
number of days in March, 1930,
when they totaled $384,853,426.
BRIGHT SPOT
802 PACKARD ST.
TODAY, 12:00 to 2:00
WAFFLES, PORK SAUSAGE
AND COFFEE
TWO EGGS, TOAST, BACON
THIRTY CENTS
5430' to 7:30
SPECIAL FIFTY CENT DINNER
ROAST CHICKEN,
HOT BISCUITS
MASHED POTATOES
.CREAM GRAVY
HEAD LETTUCE SALAD
FRENCH DRESSING
AND PEAS
SPECIAL 35c DINNER
ROAST SIRLOIN OF BEEF
MUSHROOM SAUCE
STUFFED PORK CHOPS, JELLY
BAKED SPICED HAM,
RAISIN SAUCE
MASHED POTATOES
HEAD LETTUCE SALAD
OR PEAS
WE DELIVER PHONE 8241

Associated Press Photo
Sir iubero Wilkins (right) in his New York apartm'ient shows Jean
Jules Verne, grandson of the famous French writer, the route his expe-
dition wi take in its attempt to reach the north pole under the ice
with the submarine Nautilus. Verne, who came to the United States
from France especially for the ceremony, will christen the submarine

The courses offered, states the ---
bulletin, are designed to meet the
needs of students preparing for en-
trance to the University, those de- MAY REFUSE PROBE
siring to substitute summer work
for that of the regular year, those n
who are looking to the study of
pharmacy, medicine, forestry, or U
dentistry, teachers in high schools
and colleges, and graduate students Roosevelt to Give His Decision
Hig heigher Degrees Given. Next Week After Studying
Those competent to enroll for Evidence in Case.
higher degrees will be afforded an
opportunity to do work in botany NEW YORK, Mar. 21.-(A)-The
during the summer along the lines newspapers today indicated there
best suited to their needs. Such was belief in various quarters that
work, says the bulletin, when sat- Gov. Roosevelt would not have
isfactorily completed, will be ac- Mayor Walker's official acts inves-
cepted as a fulfillment of the re- tigated.
quirement for such degrees. In or- The New York American. said it
der to secure the master's degree had learned on unimpeachable au-
by summer study, the student must thority that the governor would
devote his time for four summers not order an investigation because
to graduate work in botany and re- he did not consider the accusations
fated subjects, the distribution of of nonfeasance made by the City E
his time to be arranged by the. de- Affairs committee explicit enough
partment. or supported sufficiently by specifi-
During the summer of 1932, the cations.{
class in mycology expects to spend The governor will sift the evi-
the summer in field work in the dence over the week-end at his
Rocky mountains. The party will home in Hyde Park, the paper said,
be located at some appropriate and announce his decision early
headquarters. Work will progress next week, possibly Monday.
under the dire'ction of Dr. Lewis The New York He::ald Tribune
E. Wehmeyer. Those interested in published a dispatch frvam its staff
diversifying their botanical experi- correspondent at Palm Springs,
encedby a summer in the West are Calif., to the effect that Mayor
urged by the department to enter Walker feels he has nothing to fear
into correspondence with Dr. Weh. and that the governor will have
meyer. no recourse but to vindicate hin-.

yster's A esthetic
Values Are Upheld
ANNAPOLIS, Md., March 21.-
(A)- The Maryland legislature
formally has come to the defense
of the oyster.
The senate Friday approved a
resolution which had passed the
house of delegates condemning
"libelous, untruthful and poison-
ous propaganda" disseminated
by a Battle Creek, Mich., cereal
company.
A copy of the resolution is to
be sent to the Michigan state
board of health. The Battle Creek
concern, the legislature was told,
sent out printed matter describ-
ing the oyster as "dangerous to
one's health and aesthetic sense."

Late Friday, however, he under-
went a change of heart and an-
nounced that since Prosecutor Har-
ry S. Toy "went down while fight-
ing for me, I'll fight for him."
The prosecutor collapsed in the
courtroom shortly after Tara had
been placed under arrest and his
testimony stricken from the record
until he elected to undergo cross-
examination.
Assistant prosecutor, carrying on
while their chief recuperates at his
home, said Tara would be recalled
to the stand. He was not to ao-
pear today, however. the naii uay
session being devoted chiefly to the
reading of Buckley's political ad-
dresses, begun Friday by the pros-
ecution. The addresses are intend-
ed by the state to prove motive.
Copenhagen Professor
Will Talk Here Friday
Prof. Harold Bohr, of the depart-
ment of mathematics, Copenhagern
university, will deliver a University
decture at 4:15 o'clock on Friday
March 27, in room 1035 Angell hall
His subject will be "Almost Period
ic Functions."
On Monday, March 30, Prof
Theodore F. S. L. Plaut, of Ham
burg, will speak in Natural Scienc
auditorium on "Unemployment In
surance and its Effect on the Eco
omic Position of Germany.

7
-e
y
,
.
E.
-

11 C4 Y ttl i a1 11G t'ht;1 "4iuSf'jUnlt G1G
Mueller always had the confidence
of the large body of his country-
men and with the late Dr. Strese-
mann is given credit generally for
having put over the Young plan
and evacuation of the occupied ter-
ritories. He was leader of the So-
cial Democratic party and a news-
paper man by profession.
Little known outside the confines
of the reich until the revolution of
1918, Hermann Mueller was raised
by that upheaval to a place of
prominence in the new Germany.

MONDAY, APRIL 6
KENNETH MACGOWAN and JOSEPH VERNER REILD
present
-IECOVL

-_

-CE rn -- - -rte s

IN A NEW PLAY By BENN W LEVY
ART& Mis. BCT TL

g

:00 P. M.

-CE

1:30 A.M.

An hilarious comedy upon the pretentiousness
of th: "'arty" artists and adolescent love
with LEON QUARTERMAINE, WALTER KINGSFORD,
G. P. HUNTLEy, JR. and LEWIS MARTIN
Direct from MAXINE EJL IOTT'S THEATRE, NEW YORK
ORDER YOUR SEATS NOW BY MAIL
Enclose self addressed stamped envelop with check.
Lower floor, $2.50; Balcony, first four rows, $2.00; next
four, $1.50; remaining, $1.00.

''"'

v.chigan Union
ALL CAMPUS SALE

$3.50

March 27, 1931
Slater-Wahr-Union

;,l

-, ll I I I mmummum

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THEY'R E'AT HOME' TO YOU!

r
/.. 9

Frantic newspapermen moil help-
lessly otside their barred front door
--while you walk into their drawing-
rooms and boudoirs! And peak into
thl extremely private lives and loves
of -America's favorites!

'5..
EX'TRA ADDEDZ17

and Jolly
JOE. E. BROWN

Laughingest Team
On The Screen!

i 111 * , ": W HZ. U F A U

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