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March 21, 1931 - Image 5

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Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-21

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HI-I 21, 1931.

THE MIC1GA N DAILY

t

N
"

MIMBERS SELECT
PAGEANT POSITIONS
IN GROUPMEETING
Ruth Duhme Chosen as Assistant
to General Chairman
by Committee.
MISS WHITE TO ADVISE

Eligible Women
Without

May Take Part
Previous

Experience.

Designation' of positions which.
the members of the central com-
mittee of the Freshman Pageant
will hold was made yesterday at
a conference which the committee
held with Miss Ethel McCormick,
faculty advisor for the affair.
Harriet Jennings has been chosen
general chairman, Ruth Duhme
will- serve as assistant. Elizabeth
Cooper will head the finance com-
mittee. The chairmen were elected
at large last week, and have been
assigned to the offices to which
they are best adapted.
Seven Hold Positions.
Ada Blackman will be in charge
of costumes, and Margaret Cole will
be chairman of dances. Caroline
Hydew was assigned to publicity,
while Dorothea Hunt has charge of
music, and Pauline Brooks will
oversee the music, and Grace
Mayer will take care of the poster
arrangements. Committee members
will be selected at an early date, in
order to get the work under way.
as soon, as possible.
Miss Emily White, who will be
faculty advisor for the dances, has
outlined the general plane for the
pageant. The history of music as
expressed in the dance will be the
subject of this year's event, and
the dances have been divided into

FLORENCE ECKER T
SPEAKS ON BYRON
Reviews Poet Before Language
Sections of Academy.
By S. R. M., '32
It has been a peculiar thing to
those who have studied Byron that
he excited such differences of opin-
ion in the minds of his readers.
Those who were his most fervent
admirers at first, would later be-
come his harshest critics.
In her paper which she gave yes-
terday afternoon before the Lan-
guage section of the Michigan
Academy, Miss Florence Eckert, of
the Michigan State Normal College,
illustrated this with quotations from
letters and .memoires of Byron's
contemporaries.
Her paper was called "Byronism
and Anti-Byronism in England
from 1824 to 1850" and although
she described this change of feel-
ing, she did not explain it to any
extent. The only reason which she
gave for it was the growth in moral
sentiment at the time.
Dr. Clarence D. Thorpe, professor
of English, who commented on the
paper, stated that practically all
people who bring this up always re-{
frain from explaining the cause. He
said that although some of them
do give the same reason as did Miss
Eckert, that could scarcely account
for it as Ruskin, who was never
without high moral standards, was
among the first to hold forth on the
quality of Byron's works.
Dr. Thorpe feels that something
of the writer's personality which
made him so difficult to live with
crept into his works and that after
the glamour of his physical pres-
ence had disappeared, this otherj
trait was felt in his books.
Dormitories to Have
Spring Social Season
of Week-end Parties

Group Will
to Take

in Search.
All women students, as well as
members of the Women's Athletic
Association, are invited to attend
the treasure hunt to be held by that
organization at 2 o'clock this after-
noon.
The group will meet at the Wo-
men's Athletic building, and will be
separated into two divisions. The
two :groups will take different
routes, and after the treasure has
been discovered, both divisions will
return to the Athletic building for
refreshments.
Students Given Points.
Students who have attended two
outdoor parties this year, and who
come to the treasure hunt, will be
eligible for membership in the Out-
door club to be organized next week
according to Audrey Callander, '33,
outdoor manager of W. A. A. All
those who attend five outdoor par-
ties during the year will receive 25
W. A. A. points, and 50 points will
be given for attendance at 10 par-
ties. W. A. A. points will also be
awarded for each mile hiked during
an outdoor party.
Arrangements for the treasure
hunt are being made by Miss Cal-
landar, who is being assisted by the
W. A. A. social committee, J e a n
Botsford, '32, Clara Grace Peck, '33,
Gladys Schroeder, '33, Dorthea Wa-
terman, '32, and Anna Neberle, '32.
Plan Other Parties.
This party will be the fifth in a
series of outdoor parties being given
by W. A. A. this year, the others be-
ing a hike and three skiing and to-
baggoning parties. The series will
be continued tgroughout the re-
mainder of the semester.
Members of the physical educa-
tion faculty for women wil be spe-
cial guests at the party this after-
noon.
ALUMNA RETURNS
HOME FROM INDIA
Miss Martha Downey Has Spent'
Five Years Among Hindus.
Martha Downey, '08 (Sister Mar-1
tha of the Episcopal Oxford Mis-
sion of the Sisterhood of the
Epiphony) has her furlough this
year and is now on her way to the
United States from India, where
for the last five years, she has beens
doing work. Miss Downey was asso-
ciated with the Y. W. C. A. in
India, and was General Secretary'
of South India, and later, Secretary
in Calcutta.
Mary McKibbin-Harper, '99M.,
who is practicing in Oak Park,
Illinois, has travelled extensively
and has written a number of medi-
cal travel articles on her journeys.
She is co-editor of the Med$cal
Review of Reviews.
idents this past week Tuesday eve-
ning. The decorations for the din-
ner were carried out entirely in the
scheme of green and white. Fol-
lowing the play the seniors enter-
tained the juniors with songs and
some of the girls who are taking
part in the play gave skits from
"Came the Dawn!" This last part
of the evening's entertainment took
place from 11 until 12 o'clock.

Form Two Divisions
Different Routes

WAAA INVITES ALL

Ping-Pong Winners
Will Play in Final
Contest Next Week

Second and third rounds of theI
ping-pong tournament are being
rapidly played off, and the con-
testants will be paired off again
next week for the final rounds.
Those who have played since
Wednesday are Helen Moore, '31,
and Lenore LeGendre, '34, with a
score of 15-21, 21-17 and 25-23 in
Miss Moore's favor; Jane Robinson,
'31, and Mary Whitney, '31, the
score being 20-22, and 14-21 in Miss
Robinson's favor.
Maxine Fischgrund, '33, Lydia
Seymour, '34, and Florence Benell,
'31, won rounds by default. Kathar-
ine Barnard, '33, was defeated by
Anne Baldwin, '32, by a score of
21-11, and 21-17. Agnes Graham,
'32, defeated Mriam Carver, '33, by
a score of 21-15 and 21-12.
Esther Loucks, '32, defeated Jean
Berride, '33, by a score of 21-9 and
21-11. Margaret Seeley, '31, won the
two games out of three in her
round with Katharine Jackson, '34,
the scores being 21-18, 21-15, and
21-18.
Third rounds should be finished
this week. Entrants who do not
play at the time assigned them will
forfeit their round, according to an
announcement by Marjorie Hunt,
'32, who is managing the tourna-
ment.
N T R AM U R AL
NTER CLA SS
NEWS
Women who wish to ride at 10
o'clock tomorrow morning at the
Fair Grounds will meet in the lobby
of the League building at 9:50
o'clock. Transportation will be fur-
nished. Those who are planning to
ride should call Mr. Guy Mullison
to order their horses.
Classes will also be held at 7:15
o'clock on Tuesday and Thursday
nights next week, beginners riding
on Tuesday night and experiencedI
riders on Thursday. Those who wish
to ride with the groups on either
Sunday, Tuesday or Thursday are
asked to sign their names on the
bulletin board in Barbour gymnasi-
um.
All women living in league houses
who wish to have their times taken
for the Intramural swimming meet
are asked to report at the Union
pool at 7:15 o'clock Tuesday night,
March 24. Sorority and dormitory
women may also compete Tuesday
night. The last preliminary meet,
to be held Thursday night, will be
devoted to diving.j

Rushing Dinners, Parties Provide Social
Program for Week at Sorority Houses

Rushing dinners seem to be the Sailors, '32, Grand Rapids; Eleanor
only form of entertainment to lend Allen, '34, Highland Park; Lois Hal-
variety to the week's social program liday, '34, Chappaqua, N. Y.; Ethel
of parties for the juniors and sen- Brown, '34, Concord, Mass.; Ruth
iors in the sororities. Kaser, '34, Aurora, Ill.; Constance
Thursday night Alpha Gamma Beery, '33, Detroit; Alice Uhlmann,
Delta gave a rushing dinner for six. '32, Grand Rapids; Jane Fauber,
guests. Spring flowers were used as '34, Highland Park.
table decorations. Speakers for the formal banquet
Chi Omega gave a spread on which the actives gave in honor
Monday night for the junior mem- of the new members were Miss Alta
bers of the house who are in the Allen Loud, past national president
Junior Girls' Play. Those who have of Alpha Chi Omega, and Janice
parts in the play gave their skits. Gillette, '31, toastmistress, Jane
Pi Beta Phi gave a spread for Fauber, '34, Dorothy Smith, '33,
its juniors last Monday night after Ed.wina Jenney, '32, Mary Parnel,
the play. Miss Mariam Durand is '31, and Edna Mae Jennings, an
a guest at the Pi Beta Phi house alumna of the chaper. Decora-
this week. tions for the banquet were in
Last Tuesday evening, Mrs. Eva lavender and pink, carried out with
A. Anderson, chaperon of the Delta sweet peas, roses and snapdragons.
Delta Delta house gave a spread for
the juniors and seniors after the Virginia Watson Made
first performance of the play. This W.A.A. Tennis Head
evening the seniors are giving a *
supper-party for the juniors. Virginia Watson, '32, was ap-
Gamma Phi Beta wishes to an-pointed tennis manager of the
nounce the pledging of Elizabeth
Farrell, '32, of Ann Arbor. Women's Athletic Association at
Alpha Chi Omega initiated nine the meeting of the executive board
women last week-end, and gave a Thursday afternoon. She will re-
dinner in their honor following the place Constance Giefel, '33, whc
ceremony. Those initiated were recently resigned.
Jean Echert, '34SM, Detroit; Helen Miss Watson was formerly Wis-
-- consin state singles champion, and
Dean Griffith Declaresdin the Intercollegiate ten-
DeanGrr ith eclaes tournament held last summer.
Tariffs Must be Low The board also voted to make the
chairman of the membership com-
That the new financial position mittee, Gladys Schroeder, '33, an
which the United States has held ex-officio member of the board foi
since the World war calls for a poli- the remainder of the year.
cy of materially reduced tariffs was
the point emphasized by Dean C. E. BOSTON UNIVERSITY - Dear
Griffin of the school of business Everett Lord of this university an-
administration in his talk yester- nounced recently that he believec
day afternoon at the meeting of the a college degree to be worth $72,000
American Association of University
Women.!
"Since the war," said Dean Grif- FRATERNITY JEWELRY
fin, "America has become a credi-
tor nation instead of a debtor na-
tion as formerly. This creditor stat-
us must inevitably lead to a change CARL
in our merchandise balance of
trade, which has, since 1873, been JEWELER ANE
a so-called favorable balance, with Nickel
exports exceeding imports."
Continuing his argument, he said -______ _
tha thIe inerest flowing backe fr m - - -d-- --
American foreign investments will NEWS of the NEW
force an excess of imports over ex-E
ports. This excess can be' brought
about either by diminution of ex-
ports or an increase in the imports.
He concluded by saying that a high
tariff would check not only the im-
ports but the exports and thus ef-
fect a diminution of America's for- 25 Dresses Size
eign trade.
CROSLEY AMRAD BOSCH This group includ
SHOP II

1
1
A
3
1
7
3

eight periods. Eligible women may Week-end parties are the vogue
take part in one or more of these for the social calendars of the dor-
dances, and for several of them, no mitories. Adelia Cheever is enter-
previous experience is necessary. taining at a mother's week-end
Plan Historical Theme. party. The guests arrived Friday
Each of the periods will represent night and were entertained at the
one of the phases in musical his- Junior Girls' Play. This morning
tory, and they will be divided as they are to be taken through the
follows: primitive Grecian, renais- Law Club and the new Law Library.
sance, classical, early Italian, ro- This afternoon they will be en-
mantic, impressionistic, and mod- tertained at Adelia Cheever with a
ernistic. Costuming will further the tea. The decorations for the affair
historical theme, and the music will axe to be carried out in the color
also be typical of each period. scheme of yellow and lavender.
Four. natural dancing sections Miss Elizabeth Urban, the house
are now working out some of the president, will assist with the pour-
more difficult dances, and fresh- ing.
men women are invited to attend Martha Cook also follows with a
these classes for observation. week-end party for the Alumnae.
This is an annual affair. About
Glee Club Will Sing ninety guests are expected to ar-
rive today. This afternoon there
Over Detroit Station will be a business meeting conduct-
At 7:30 tonight the University of ed, following which there will be a
Michigan will be represented on the bridge tea. The Board of Gover-
ai hennivbe rst edirls' Glee nors will be present at this func-
air by .the University Girls'Ge tion. The board includes the fol-
club which is scheduled to broad- long ebrd:nlrserk .
cast over WJR. Some numbers on wing members: Mrs. Frederick B.
the program will be Michigan songs Stevens, Mrs. Harvy Bulkley, ands
and solo numbers by Mildred Miss Emilie Sargent. Mrs. Stevens
Drinkhaus, 31SM, a pupil of Arthur will pour.
Hackett: Miss Nora Crane Hunt, In the evening the guests will be
of the School of Music, is director entertained at dinner and all of
of the organization. them will attend the Junior Girls'
Broadcasting in former years has Play. After the play the seniors will
brought congratulatory telegrams present a take off on the Junior
from numerous cities all over the Girls' Play. Sunday noon the alum-
United States. nae guests will be entertained at
A week from tonight the Girls' dinner once more and following
Glee club is sponsoring a formal this there will be a musicale in the
dance with the Men's Glee club of drawing room.
the University, to be given at the Mosher hall held a Saint Patrick
Delta Gamma house. dinner in honor of the junior res-

WE SELL
WE RENT
WE SERVICE
Tel. 2-2812

.radios'
615 E. Williams

A

111

I

i

SCHOOL OF MUSIC CONCERTS
(NO Admission Charge)

U

I

We value above all things the loyalty of our customers. For loyalty
is something which must be earned-and earned on the basis of char-
acter and integrity. Were we to sum up in one brief sentence the policy
of the Ann Arbor Savings Bank we would say simply this: We strive to
operate in such a way that we shall deserve always the loyalty of those
with whom we do business.
WILLIAM L. WALZ, President
OFFICERS
WILLIAM L. WALZ, President
JOHN C. FRITZ.............. Vice President
ROY B. HISCOCK..................Vice President
ALFRED F. STAEB....................... Cashier
NORMAN A. OTTMAR ........ Asst. Vice President
ERNEST W. WAIDELICH............ Asst. Cashier
PEN E. PRYER ................. Asst. Cashier
RALPH LUTZ ................... .Asst. Cashier
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
WM. L. WALZ

I

HANNS PICK
Violoncellist, and
ALICE MANDERBACH
Accompanist
Sun., March 22, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
WASSILY BESEKIRSKY
Violinist, and
MABEL ROSS RHEAD
Pianist, in Sonata Recital
Sun., March 29, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
JOSEPH BRINKMAN
Pianist
Sun., April 5, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
THELMA NEWELL
Violinist, and
LOUISE NELSON
Pianist in Sonata Recital
Sun., April 26, 4:15, Mendelssohn Theater
SCHOOL OF MUSIC TRIO

JOHN C. FRITZ
ROY B. HISCOCK
LEWIS E. WENZEL
LEWIS M. GRAM
ORMOND E. HUNT

ALEXANDER G. RUTHVEN
OSCAR A. EBERBACH

11

EARL H.
GEORGE
ALFREDI

CRESS
J. MOE
F. STAEB

I

Wassily Besekirsky
Violinist
Joseph Brinkman
Pianist

Hanns Pick
Violoncellist

IA n ini A --~krht V sqTFI1i n6e. IR in1r

I

IlHI

I

1111l

E r, 1L of 6"b A 16 rd 'SO 1 1 1 rvT M

1 111 I AW W..,t REM EN VERV s 111

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