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March 14, 1931 - Image 5

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Text
Publication:
The Michigan Daily, 1931-03-14

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SATURDAY. ;MARCH 14, 1931

THE MICHIGAN DAILY

PAC;E9 FIVE

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Freshmen

Women Choose Harriet Jennings Pageant Chairman

RUT-H- DUHMETOACT A ASSSISTANT
DCOMMITTEE FOR ANNUAL UNCTION

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Class Selects General Chairmen
for Executive Work of
First Undertaking.
TO CHOOSE COMMITTEES
Eligibility Required for Womeni
Who Wish to Participate
in Pageant.
Harriet Jennings was elected gen-
eral chairman of the annual Fresh-
man Pageant at the meeting held
yesterday afternoon in the Lydia
Mendelssohn theatre.. Ruth Duhme1
was chosen as assistant chairman,
and Elizabeth Cooper was selected
as chairman of the finance com-
mittee.
Seven Chairmen Chosen.
Seven other women were also
named to serve as chairmen of the
general committees, and their exact
positions will be determined at the
first meeting of the central com-
mittee. Ada Blackman, Margaret
.Cole, Pauline Brooke, Dorothea
Hunt, Jean Eckert, Grace Mayer,
and Caroline Hyde were chosen in
this capacity.
The meeting yesterday was the
second to be held, to a tie vote for
five of the positions in the elections
held Wednesday afternoon. Helen
DeWitt; '33, who was general chair-
man of last year's Pageant, gave
a brief outline of the activities in-
volved in its presentation, and
commented on the duties of each
of the committeeyheads. She stress-
ed the valuable contacts which'
could be made by entering into this
only activity- permitted the fresh-
man women as a class.
Central Theme Told.
Miss'tthel McCormick, Social Di-
rector, described the success achiev-
ed. by the previous class in pre-:
senting both the Pageant and the'
Sophomore Cabaret, and discussed
eligibility requirements.
Miss ,Martha White, dancing in-
structor in the Physical Education
department, who will have charge{
of the dances in the Pageant, told
the central theme of this year's
presentation, and asked all eligible
women to come out for the different
dances.

Women Given Equal
Chance In Annual
Oratorical Contest
With the announcement of the
1931 Northern Oratorical league
contest, comes the question, do wo-
men participate and if they do what
chances do they have of being
placed?
"Women have as mucla an oppor~
tunity in this contest as men," stat-
ed Prof. James M. O'Neill, of the
speech department who is in charge
of the M i c h i g a n preparations.
"There is no distinction made of
any kind," he continued, "and we
urge that the women sign up for
try outs."
As to the opportunities that wo-
men have in placing, Professor
O'Neill stated that in the league five
universities have been represented
a number of times by women in-the
finals. Last year a woman from the
University of Minnesota gave tne
winning oration.
STUDENTS SUBMIT
MARKINGREPORTS

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DORMITORIES GIVE'
FACULT YDINNERS
Betsy Barbour and Martha Cook
Entertain.
Faculty dinners were featured on
the social calendars of the dormi-
tories during the past week. Betsy
Barbour entertained the following
guests at a formal dinner Thursday
evening: Professor T. Luther Pur-
dom, and Mrs. Purdom, Professor
Morris P. 1illey and Mrs. Tilley,
Priof essor Paul S. Welch and Mrs.
Welch, Professor Louis C.Karpin-
ski and Mrs. Karpinski, Professor
Edward C. Jandy and Mrs. Jandy,
Mr. and Mrs. S. Morley Scott, Mr.
and Mrs. EarlDE. Fleishman, and
lMr. Harold M. Dorr.
Martha Cook entertained infor-
mally at a faculty dinner Wednes-
day evening. The guests included:
Professor Robert D. McKenzie and
Mrs. McKenzie, Professor Randolph
G. Adams and Mrs. Randolph G
Adams, Professor Paul S. Welch and
Mrs. Welch, Professor Henry S.
Hutchins and Mrs. Hutchins, Mr.
and Mrs. Melvin Pike, and Profes-
sor, and Professor Arthur L. Cross.
The decoration scheme was car-
ried out in talisman roses and green
tapers. Following dinner coffee was
served in the blue room. Miss Alta
Bernice Atkinson poured, and Miss
Margaret Ruth Smith acted as
hostesses for the evening.
NURSERY SCHOOL
CHILD IS SUBJECT

SOPHOMORES I9
ATHLETICTOURNEY
Senior and Junior Basketball
Teams Tie for Second
Place in Contest.
Sophomores won the highest per-
centage of games in the Interclass
basketball tournament which was
,oncluded this week, gaining vic-
.ories in 60 per cent of the games
played. Seniors and juniors tied
for second place each class winning,
30 per cent of its games. The fresh-
nan teams placed third with a per-
3entage of 40.
Each class had two teams entered
.n the tournament composed of the
pest players in the class. Member-I
;hip on the teams was determined
'y the players' records during the
intramural tournament which was
run off previous to the interclass
contest. The two highest individual
teams were the J-Hoppers, a junior
team, and the Basketeers, a sopho-
more team, .both of which won 80
per cent of the games and so raised
their class percentage.
The Onions, a freshman team,
came second winning 60 per cent.
Senior teams, the Cagers and the
Cardinals won 50 peracenthand 40
per cent respectively, and the Blue-
jays, the other junior team won 20
per cent of its games. The fresh-
'man team, the Lemons, had the
lowest rating, winning only 20' per-
cent.
Cotton Frocks Advised
for Depression Relief
Women on the campus of the
University of Colorado will soon ap-
pear in cotton dresses if the wo-
men's judiciary body is successful
in carrying out a new plan. The
senate is making this proposal to
the coeds in answer to a nation
wide appeal for a greater purchase
of cotton goods.
Colleges in northeastern and
western states showed little enroll-
metchanges while school in the
north central and, southeastern
states gained slightly during 1930.

Complete Well..Being.
"From all the present statistical
evidence, it would seem that wo-
men are forced to consider' more!
thoughtfully their position in the
business and professional world,"
states Dr. Margaret Bell, Prof. of
Physical Education, Director of
Physical Education for Women and
Physician to the Health Service.
"In analyzing those factgrs on
which success and failure depend,
I feel that physical vigor is one of
the most important.
"I am prepared to say at the out-j
set," continues Dr. Bell, "that we
are wasting money educating wo-
men if we do not at the same time
undertake the responsibility of in-
creasing the vigor of these women
over a long period of years. Wo-
I men still do not realize that theyj
may be working for self-support
for the rest of their lives, so there
is no impetus to the cultivation of
organic reserve or physical vigor.
-Witness the high incidence of
tuberculosis at college age and the
mal-adjustment of women from
this age on.
Sleep is Insufficient.
"The average university woman
does not lead a well-balanced life,"
says Dr. Bell. "She does not sleep
enough, eat enough, or exercise
enough,-she puts no premium on
vitality. If she is a good student,
she is often specialized to the ne-
glect of political, economic, recrea-
tional and cultural interests. True
enough, the student of college age
should have been satisfactorily mo-
tivated in basic health habits--
sleep (rest and mental hygiene),
nutrition, and exercise, but even
now .with all the work that has
been done up to date in this phase
of education from the pre-school
child up, we are far from our ghal
-that of stimulating the student
to develop an adequate skill and
love of activity which will encour-
age her to carry on-vigorous,
stable, happy for a long period of
time.

DR. BELL EXPLAINS HOW PHYSICAL
VIGOR HELPS SUCCESS OF WOMEN
Average College Student's Life dividual. First, it is essential to
Not Balanced Enough for growth and development. Secondly,

exercise is essential to the main-
tenance of health and the acquire-
ment of bodily vigor. At is possible!
to ascertain by physiological means
the optimum of exercise for each
individual. The nearer the individ-
ual comes to her optimum the far-t
ther she is from fatigue and sus-
ceptibility to infection. Nervous'
stability varies with the individual's
best condition. Thirdly, the remed-
ial effects of corrective exercise in
orthopedic conditions and in dis-
ease are well known. Fourth, the
recreational effects of exercise are
accepted. And, finally, there are
the social values that are best ac-
quired through team game experi-
ence.
Mental Problems Count.
"Buoyancy in life depends on
howr well yuare; whether or not
you are concious of being well"
stated Dr. Bell. "We all recognize
the fact that the individual who is
suffering from indigestion, head-
ache, neuralgia, backache etc., is
not at his best intellectually. 'There
is no possibility of separating your
physical from your mental well-be-
ing. The better medical practition-
ers recognize the fact that the
great proportion of patients come
to the doctor not alone with phys-
ical illness, but with physical ill-
ness combined with a psychic fac-
tor, or with mental problems alone.I

A, A, UM TO| LECTU
Ann Arbor Chapter to Convene
Today at 3 o'clock in
League Building.
Eight delegates to the national
convention of the American Asso-
ciation of University Women will be
selected at the meeting of the Ann
Arbor chapter to be held at three
thirty today in the Ethel Fountain
Hussey room of the League.
The convention will be held in
Bostori from April 8 to 11. Women
presidents of women's colleges to-
gether with prominent educators
will attend and contribute their in-
dividual viewpoints to the discus-
sions. Leading the whole meeting
'is Dr. Mary Woolley, president of
Mt. Holyoke College, who is the na-
tional president of the Association.
The first affair will be the edu-
cation dinner at which Mrs. Doro-
thy Canfield Fisher, noted writer,
will give the principal address.
"Learn or Perish as College Wo-
men." Thursday there will be three
separate round-table groups; Dr.
Edna White, director of the Merrill-
Palmer School in Detroit will at-
tend the one on the "Pre-School
Child." The other discussions will
a 1 s o center around progressive
I movements in education.

Houses Answer Questionnaires
on Grading System.
"Results from the questionnaires
on the marking system sent out last
month by the Board of Represen-
tatives have been highly gratify-
ing," stated Albertina Maslen, '31,
chairman of the board. Almost all
of the houses have sent in reports,
in some cases very detailed, on the
prevailing student opinion of the
present grading system, and cer-
tain definite criticisms are common
to most of them."
"Most of the reports agreed that
freshmen are not marked too low,
and many seem to feel that a more
stringent grading~helps rather than
hinders the first year students,"
MissMaslen continued. "Many
commented on the discrepancies
between the different schools and
even the different departments in
marks, and several advocated grad-
ing on accomplishment rather than
on effort.
The survey is being made in co-
operation with Registrar Ira W.
Smith, who is working with the
students in order to obtain a com-
prehensive view of the marking
system. A report will be submitted
to a faculty conference sometime
in May, and Mr. Smith will also
present the statistics to the Nation-
al Registrar's Conference t h i s
spring.
The next All-Campus forum,
which will be conducted under the
auspices of the Student Christian
association, March 26, will discuss
the subject in detail. Any one es-
pecially interested should get in
touch with Miss Maslen, in order
to be put on a student-faculty com-
mittee.

Dr.

Katherine Greene Speaks
to Educational Club.

In a recent address before the
Women's Educational Club, Dr.
Katherine Greene, Prof. of educa-
tional psychology, spoke of the pre-
school movement, describing the
system in the University Element-
ary school.
She said that the entire course
stresses self-initiative for the pur-
pose of making the child indepen-
dent.
Dr. Greene continued saying that
they attempted to stimulate inter-
est in creative work for which pat-
ience is of the utmost importance.
In this type of training, she told
that theypcontrol the children
through environment and get the
students to do things correctly be-
cause of an "inner urge."
COMPLETE LINE
of
ARTISTS'
SUPPLIES
also
PAINTING
DECORATING
PICTURE FRAMING
WENZEL'S
207 E. Liberty Phone 6713

Among the Best and at 1
Reasonable Prices
FREEMAN'S
DINING ROOM

Lunches 40c, Dinners 60c

Sunday Dinner 75c

Women Should Exercise.
"Physicalheducation," Dr. Bell
continues, "has at least four dis-
tinct contributions to make toward
satisfactory integration of the in-

ONLY ONE BLOCK NORTH FROM HILL AUDITORIUM
i-

I

Senior Women May
Yet Purchase Gowns

CLOI3

Senior women who have not yet
obtained their caps and gowns may
still purchase them in the Alumnae
Council room of the League build-
ing, according to an announcement
,made by Helen Cheever, '31, who
is in charge of arrangements.
The gowns are priced at five dol-
lars, and the caps at two dollars
and fifty cents, and a deposit of
two dollars and fifty cents is re-
quired. The deposit will be refund-
ed in June of the gowns are re-
tuined. ___

OUR

ENra┬░I iE

---- I

We are sacrificing our entire stock, mos
slightly damaged by smoke and water, a
you cannot afford to pass up. There are
in every department and you will do wel
this unmatched ten-day-sale today.

Almost Unbelievable--
Nevertheless, It's a Fact!
OUR ENTIRE STOCK OF
Fur Coats, Jacquettes
and Scarfs
at theLowest PicesnaDecade!
Back in 1904 we started here to build our reputation
as Honest Furriers, NOW, 26 years later we offer the
fruit of our ripe experience-Tangible QUALITY,
SERVICE and VALUES.
I A hundreds of nther well dressed women-make

Colored BROAD-
C L OTH PAJAMAS
with wide trousers and
tuck in tops are .. .
$1.29
SILK STOCKINGS in
all the newest Spring
colors. Now is the time
to lay in a supply .. .
79c
Slightly smoke stained
BLOUSES will wash
beautifully and add a
smart note to your Spring
suit . ..
$1.29
HANDBAGS in all the
smartest materials ...
$2.49

SPRING COA

UT.
t of it only
tt prices that
real savings
J to come to
LINGERIE that is only
L slightly stained by smoke
T S is marked for clear
ance
$2.79
L I N E N HANDKER-
9Q8 CHIEFS in white with
colored borders are . .
6 for 59c
Smart spring HATS of
2.98 straw or felt will do won-
ders for your ward-
robe..
$3.98
HOES
in this No Spring wardrobe is
:art as complete without several
SCARFS . .. these are
le particularly lovely.
3.98 79c to $4.98

Reduced

I

A marvelous opportunity to get your
new Spring coat. All the smartest styles
are represented . . . spongy woolens in
all the shades that are best for Spring
.. .navy and skipper blue . . . black,
tan and bright colors. Many are trim-
med with beautiful furs.

$1'

Other Groups from $16.98 to $4;

PULL-ON GLOVES in
shades to blend with
Easter costumes ... and
you'd never know they
had been through
smoke ...
$1.98

Even MATRIX S]
have been reduced
sale. They're as sn
they are comfortab
$7.98 and $f

III

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